Loading…

Sign up or log in to bookmark your favorites and sync them to your phone or calendar.

Monday, November 4
 

7:00am

Registration Check-In
PLEASE NOTE: Location is in the Upper Lobby of the Francis Marion Hotel. Conference registration is NOT AVAILABLE at the Gaillard Center. Vendor badges for booth will be located in your packet on your assigned table for the vendor showcase.

Check in upon arrival to receive your conference badge and attendee materials. Conference badges will be required for entry into conference venues, the reception, and conference shuttles.
The desk will be open the following hours:

Monday, 11/4, 7:00 am - 7:00 pm
Tuesday, 11/5, 7:00 am – 7:00 pm
Wednesday, 11/6, 7:00 am – 7:00 pm
Thursday, 11/7, 7:00 am – 6:00 pm
Friday, 11/8: CLOSED (All registration materials will be moved to the Information Desk on the Mezzanine Level of the Francis Marion Hotel)

Monday November 4, 2019 7:00am - 7:00pm
Upper Lobby, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

7:30am

Conference Shuttles
The vehicles will be identified by signs indicating “THE CHARLESTON CONFERENCE.” Please pick up the van service outside of your hotels designated drop-off/pick-up or taxi area. If not appropriately signed, please   check with the hotel clerk for exact location. Although we cannot guarantee a specific schedule, due to unforeseen traffic issues, peak periods of transport, and other unexpected occurrences, our goal is to provide service to each hotel as quickly and efficiently as possible.

Conference shuttles run daily throughout the event - see our Shuttle Schedule for details.

Transportation services provided by Julian’s Transportation Service, LLC: 843-296-7941 or 843-224-1523.


Monday November 4, 2019 7:30am - Friday November 8, 2019 3:00pm

9:00am

Acquisitions Bootcamp
Registration Cost: $225 

This seminar will offer a high-level overview of the workflows and concepts of the acquisitions process, from selecting materials to interacting with vendors, and articulating the return on investment to the parent organization (academic/special/public libraries). Attendees will gain pragmatic knowledge of strategies and best practices to manage a variety of material types, such as print materials, e-books, and other e-resources. The group will also discuss how emerging issues, like Plan S for open-access science publishing, are affecting core resource management workflows. This class is ideally suited for librarians new to selection and acquisitions workflows.

Topics:
• Collection Management Overview
• Budgeting
• Assessing User Needs / Selecting Materials
• Acquisitions Workflows
• Negotiation Strategies & Legal Issues
• Collections Assessment
• (E)Resources Management
• Marketing / Outreach

Speakers
avatar for Megan Kilb

Megan Kilb

E-Resources Librarian, UNC-Chapel Hill
avatar for Rebecca Vargha

Rebecca Vargha

Head, Information and Library Science Library, UNC Chapel Hill
Rebecca Vargha is Librarian, School of Information and Library Science (SILS) at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill since 2001. Her responsibilities as head of this library include collection development, staff supervision, liaison with departmental faculty and the central... Read More →


Monday November 4, 2019 9:00am - 4:00pm
Pinckney Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

1:00pm

PivotTables are easier than you think! Simple Yet Powerful Data Visualizations for Librarians with Excel
Registration Cost: $150

Librarians and library staff work with data collected from a variety of sources however data collection doesn’t always translate to data analysis or reporting. Lack of time, budgetary constraints prohibiting the purchase of data visualization software, and potentially steep learning curves regarding using advanced features of existing software to create meaningful data visualizations can all impact individuals’ ability and/or willingness to analyze collected data using data visualizations.

In this session, we will walk all workshop attendees through the process of turning their library data (no matter how disorganized) into meaningful data visualizations using PivotTables in Excel. We will start off the workshop by discussing types of data that are best visualized with PivotTables, using examples of PivotTable visualizations created with our library’s data. We’ll discuss basic data cleaning, and specific concerns to consider when prepping your data for visualizing with Pivot Tables. We’ll share potential limitations of pivot tables and issues that you can encounter when building PivotTables. BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) is encouraged and time will be provided for workshop attendees to create their own data visualizations with the assistance of the workshop presenters.

Speakers
avatar for Monica Rysavy

Monica Rysavy

Director & Assistant Professor, Office of Institutional Research & Training, Goldey-Beacom College
Monica D.T. Rysavy, Ph.D. is the Director of Institutional Research and Training for Goldey-Beacom College in Wilmington, Delaware. In this role she leads all institutional research and data analysis projects for the College. Her office provides faculty and staff training support... Read More →
avatar for Russell Michalak

Russell Michalak

Director (Library, Archives, & Learning Center), Goldey-Beacom College
Russell Michalak, MLIS, joined Goldey-Beacom College (GBC) in 2010. As Director of Library & Learning Center/Assistant Professor, he oversees all operations of the library including the annual budget. In addition, he supervises and hires librarians, tutors, paraprofessionals, as well... Read More →


Monday November 4, 2019 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Laurens Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401
 
Tuesday, November 5
 

7:00am

Registration Check-In
PLEASE NOTE: Location is in the Upper Lobby of the Francis Marion Hotel. Conference registration is NOT AVAILABLE at the Gaillard Center. Vendor badges for booth will be located in your packet on your assigned table for the vendor showcase.

Check in upon arrival to receive your conference badge and attendee materials. Conference badges will be required for entry into conference venues, the reception, and conference shuttles.
The desk will be open the following hours:

Monday, 11/4, 7:00 am - 7:00 pm
Tuesday, 11/5, 7:00 am – 7:00 pm
Wednesday, 11/6, 7:00 am – 7:00 pm
Thursday, 11/7, 7:00 am – 6:00 pm
Friday, 11/8: CLOSED (All registration materials will be moved to the Information Desk on the Mezzanine Level of the Francis Marion Hotel)

Tuesday November 5, 2019 7:00am - 7:00pm
Upper Lobby, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

9:00am

Chaos or Complexity? Transforming Publishing Models in the Plan S Era
Registration Cost: $150

Hardly a week goes by, it seems, without either the announcement of a cancellation of a “Big Deal” or the signing of a “Transformative Agreement.” Library consortia in the US and abroad are turning to new, non-traditional models as thinking shifts on how to provide researchers with access to content as well as support for publications. Complicating their efforts are new institutional and funder mandates, including the evolving Plan S requirements, as well as differing needs across institutions and disciplines. Are emerging models adaptable to meet the needs of different types of institutions and publishers? Are they sustainable over the long term?

Join us for an interactive session on issues around new models, including Read-and-Publish, Publish-and-Read, Subscribe to Open, and more. Hear from publishers and institutions pursuing such transformative agreements, as well as those organizations, small and society, who fear they may be left out of the discussion. After some informative presentations, attendees will shift to small group discussion focusing on key issues raised during the session.

  • 9:00-9:10 am Welcome and Introductions
    Melanie Dolechek, Executive Director, SSP
  • 9:10-9:35 am State of the Deal: Transformative Agreements, Subscribe-to-Open, and Other New and Emerging Models
    Speaker: Lisa Janicke Hinchliffe, Professor/Coordinator for Information Literacy Services and Instruction, University Library, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • 9:35-10:30 am Perspectives on New and Emerging Models
    Moderator: Jean Shipman, Vice President, Global Library Relations, Elsevier.  Speakers: Curtis Brundy, Associate University Librarian for Scholarly Communications and Collections, Iowa State University; Raym Crow, Managing Partner, Chain Bridge Group; Katharine Dunn, Scholarly Communications Librarian, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Sybille Geisenheyner, Sales Manager (Europe, Middle East, India & Africa), Royal Society of Chemistry; Jasmin Lange, Chief Publishing Officer, Brill; Amy Pawlowski, Deputy Director and eResource Licensing Coordinator, OhioLINK
  • 10:30-10:45 am Break 
  • 10:45-11:45 am Roundtable Discussions and Idea Sharing 
  • 11:45 am-12:00 pm Wrap-up and Final Thoughts 
    Melanie Dolechek

Speakers
avatar for Amy Pawlowski

Amy Pawlowski

Deputy Director, OhioLINK, OhioLINK
avatar for Melanie Dolechek

Melanie Dolechek

Executive Director, SSP
Melanie Dolechek is the Executive Director of the Society for Scholarly Publishing. She has been active in scholarly publishing since 2006, previously serving as the Director of Publishing and Marketing of Allen Press. She plays an active role in the Coalition for Diversity and Inclusion... Read More →
avatar for Curtis Brundy

Curtis Brundy

AUL for Scholarly Communications and Collections, Iowa State University
I oversee collections and scholarly communications at Iowa State, which is a signatory of the OA2020 initiative. I am active with several groups that are interested in seeing, as well as assisting, scholarly publishers and societies transition to open business models.
avatar for Jean P. Shipman

Jean P. Shipman

Vice President, Global Library Relations, Elsevier
I will be glad to talk with people about libraries and Elsevier.
avatar for Lisa Hinchliffe

Lisa Hinchliffe

Professor/Coordinator for Information Literacy Services and Instruction in the University Library, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
avatar for Katharine Dunn

Katharine Dunn

Scholarly Communications Librarian, MIT Libraries
avatar for Sybille Geisenheyner

Sybille Geisenheyner

Sales Manager (Europe, Middle East, India & Africa), Royal Society of Chemistry
Sybille oversees Europe, Middle East, Africa & India in her role as Sales Manager for the Royal Society of Chemistry. During her twenty years in the industry, Sybille has worked for organisations such as SilverPlatter, Walter de Gruyter, Thomson Reuters and WoltersKluwer. She is involved... Read More →
avatar for Jasmin Lange

Jasmin Lange

Chief Publishing Officer, Brill
avatar for Raym Crow

Raym Crow

Managing Partner, Chain Bridge Group


Tuesday November 5, 2019 9:00am - 12:00pm
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

9:00am

Hacking for Good: How libraries can ‘hack’ their systems and organizations to align with future outcomes and solve the problems that truly matter.
Registration Cost: $150

Slides

See the webinar we hosted in March for more details, too!

The library is a special space on any campus. And libraries are in a unique position to serve as ideal grounds for testing out new ideas - whether improvements to internal library systems or to library services and the communities they serve. It isn’t always easy to get the time and space to make the best use of the library for exploration or ‘hacking’. Whether it’s time, or politics or just having the tools and knowledge to create your own lab or hacking center in the library, these challenges can hold you back.

This pre-conference session aims to unblock you, to enable and support your hacking. Three hours will fly by as you have hands-on fun learning from master hackers and innovators, the skills and techniques for clarifying outcomes, designing changes, testing them, getting early feedback, and most importantly, learning how to engage others to invest in your solutions.

Learning outcomes include;
- getting buy-in for your 'against-the-grain' ideas
- exploring the power of partnerships
- finding uncommon solutions to common problems
- leveraging design thinking and systems thinking
- creating a discovery project plan (step-by-step)
- expanding return-on-investment (ROI) metrics into impact metrics

All attendees will come in with an 'ambition' (some area they want to explore for change) and they will leave ready to start tackling their ambition like a true creative hacker. Plus, you get some takeaway handouts and tools that will help you back at the office.

Speakers
avatar for Alex Humphreys

Alex Humphreys

Director, JSTOR Labs, ITHAKA
Alex Humphreys (Twitter: @abhumphreys) is Associate Vice President, JSTOR and Director, JSTOR Labs at ITHAKA, a not-for-profit organization that helps the academic community use digital technologies to preserve the scholarly record and to advance research and teaching in sustainable... Read More →
avatar for Curtis Michelson

Curtis Michelson

Founder and Principal, Minds Alert, LLC
Organizational Strategy and Design
avatar for Caroline Muglia

Caroline Muglia

Co-Associate Dean for Collections, University of Southern California
Caroline Muglia is the Co-Associate Dean for Collections at University of Southern California (USC). In this capacity, she also manages collection assessment and resource sharing initiatives at the Libraries.
avatar for Heather Staines

Heather Staines

Director Business Development, MIT Knowledge Futures Group
GT

Geoff Timms

Librarian for Marine Resources, College of Charleston
Professional interests are information literacy of graduate students and the creation of web applications to enhance user experience of libraries and improve internal process efficiency. As Librarian for Marine Resources, I feel obliged to fish regularly.


Tuesday November 5, 2019 9:00am - 12:00pm
Salon II, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

9:00am

Of Views and Slips and Usage Stats, of Data Frames and Strings: An Introduction to Collections Data Analysis
Registration Cost: $150

Are you a librarian who wants to use data to support analysis of your library’s collection, but you're not sure where to start? Do you want to build a better understanding of processes that many researchers use in their own work? Or, are you a vendor who wonders what librarians actually do with that data you provide? If yes, this may be the preconference session for you!

Focusing on understanding library collections, we will talk about project organization and planning, discuss tactics for dealing with common collections data issues, share potential project ideas, and provide a basic overview of the R programming language and how it can be used to analyze data.

Attendees will leave the workshop prepared to plan their own collection analysis project, recommend best practices for data sharing and reusable research, and identify the potential benefits of using R for their work.

Speakers
avatar for Heidi Tebbe

Heidi Tebbe

Collections & Research Librarian for Engineering and Data Science, NC State University Libraries
Heidi Tebbe is the Collections & Research Librarian for Engineering and Data Science at North Carolina State University. She manages collections for subjects including engineering, computer science, physics, astronomy, and data science.
avatar for Danica Lewis

Danica Lewis

Collections & Research Librarian for Life Sciences, NC State University Libraries
I'm the Collections & Research Librarian for Life Sciences at the NC State University Libraries. I graduated from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign with an MSLIS, and from Knox College with a BA in Biology. Recently my work has included learning the programming language... Read More →



Tuesday November 5, 2019 9:00am - 12:00pm
Salon I, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

9:00am

Career Center
The Charleston Conference is pleased to offer a new career service to conference attendees at this years’ annual meeting, called the Charleston Conference Career Center. The career center will have its debut on Tuesday, November 5th at the Gaillard Center at the 2019 Charleston Conference, which will be held November 4 – 8, 2019 in Charleston, SC.

SIgn up here: https://signup.com/go/juUNRaO.

The Career Center will offer:

• Handouts on resume building and cover letters
• Resume and cover letter review by appointment
• General career consulting by experienced Charleston Conference attendees
• Posted job announcements
• A place to post your resume/CV

During the conference the Career Center will be open

• Tuesday, November 5: 9:00 AM to 6:00 PM in Gaillard Center (Job Advice)
• Wednesday, November 6: 5:45 PM to Friday, November 8 at 1:30 PM in Francis Marion Hotel (Job Bulletin Board)

Thus, we are seeking your support three ways:

1. We need individuals to serve as career advisors/coaches
2. We need people who are looking to be advised to sign up
3. We need employers to post their job descriptions to bulletin board and to be available for a meet and greet on Wednesday evening (November 6th) (optional)

As a career advisor/coach you will have the opportunity to volunteer (30 min blocks, you can sign up for more than one block) with the Conference and hone your career development skills. We are seeking advisors/coaches from a wide array of fields including librarians, archivists, publishers, vendors, and library administrators.

As an advisor/coach you will expected to do some of the following
• Review resumes and cover letters
• Offer advice and tips on the job search and job interviews

Advisees are expected to bring questions for advisors and a resume/CV. For assistance with a specific job, bring the potential job posting(s). Advisees can be from a wide array of points in their career trajectory, from new professionals to seasoned veterans.

As an employer you will have the opportunity to post job opportunities at your institution and meet with prospective candidates during the Wednesday meet and greet (5:45 PM – 6:45 PM in Francis Marion Hotel). We are seeking employers from a wide array of fields including librarians, archivists, publishers, and library administrators.

To sign up for each of these positions visit SignUp here https://signup.com/go/juUNRaO.

Deadlines:
• Register to be a career advisor by October 1, 2019
• Register to be an advisee by October 20, 2019
• Register to be an employer by October 30, 2019

Thank you and if you have any questions or concerns please contact Aaisha Haykal at haykalan@cofc.edu.

Tuesday November 5, 2019 9:00am - 6:00pm
Upper Lobby, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

10:30am

Refreshment Break
Sponsored by Unpaywall Journals

Join us for morning refreshments at the Vendor Showcase! Visit booths and browse while you eat. Food and beverage stations will be located inside the exhibit hall in the Gaillard Center Grand Ballroom, and will be provided for preconferences scheduled at the Francis Marion Hotel as well.

Sponsors
avatar for Unpaywall Journals

Unpaywall Journals

Cofounder, Our Research (Unpaywall)
Unpaywall Journals is a data dashboard with journal-level citations, downloads, open access statistics, and more to help you confidently manage your serials collection: https://unpaywall.org/journals... Read More →


Tuesday November 5, 2019 10:30am - 11:00am
Grand Ballroom, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

10:30am

Charleston Vendor Showcase
Don't miss Charleston's only day of exhibits. Browse the latest products and services, talk with reps, see demos, and snag cool freebies.  We can't wait to see you there!  

Floor Map (PDF)

List of Participating Companies (Alpha Order by Company Name)

Tuesday November 5, 2019 10:30am - 6:00pm
Grand Ballroom, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

12:00pm

Vendor Showcase Luncheon
Lunch is provided for all preconference attendees and Conference registrants on the showcase floor. Food and beverage stations will be located in the exhibits in the Gaillard Center Grand Ballroom.

Tuesday November 5, 2019 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Grand Ballroom, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

1:00pm

Be Your Best Brand: Combine Marketing and User Experience Principles to Build Brands that go Beyond Logos
Registration Cost: $150 

Information professionals know how challenging but important it can be to stand out in a crowded marketplace. Projecting strong brand identities is one way to do just that. However, relying on a logo to do all of the branding work is a common mistake. Effective brands are promises that elicit emotional responses from users. This preconference will give attendees an opportunity to understand and better leverage this important asset through hands-on, creativity-generating activities that illuminate how brands are managed and applied across user touch points.

The session will apply principles and techniques from the separate but related fields of Marketing and User Experience. Using Marketing research and literature, attendees will learn what a brand really is and how it relates to other marketing efforts, while common tools used by User Experience practitioners such as Journey Maps will help attendees apply these concepts to real-life scenarios.

Furthermore, attendees will have ample opportunity to explore branding in ways that suit a variety of learning styles and interaction preferences as the session will call upon them to reflect on case studies, draw sketches of their organization’s brand, and collaborate with others to map their branding activities to their service interactions and communications.

Speakers
avatar for Jill Stover Heinze

Jill Stover Heinze

Director of User Experience, University of Virginia Library
Jill is the Director of User Experience at UVA Library where she manages a team of web developers and user researchers to nurture positive user relationships in both physical and virtual environments. She began her library career as the Undergraduate Services Coordinator at Virginia... Read More →



Tuesday November 5, 2019 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott Hotel 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

1:00pm

From Silicon to Serials: Bringing Startup Methods to Library Innovation
Registration Cost: $150 

You’ve got an idea that you think might solve a problem for your users, but so much is standing in your way. You don’t have the time (nor permission!) to derail your day job on a concept that might not even pan out. In this session, attendees will learn how to apply Eric Reis’ Lean Startup concepts to projects in order to vet new ideas quickly, cheaply, and with scientific rigor - the way many successful startups in Silicon Valley do. Quickly develop the seeds of a good idea into something that is undeniably great or learn lessons for the future by failing fast and risking little. This workshop will apply the methods of the Startup Way to real problems, starting with the forming of an idea to having real data that points the way forward.

NOTE: While the presenters are from EBSCO, the content and opinions in the workshop are our own and will not include mention of any EBSCO products, we solemnly swear.

Speakers
avatar for Eric Frierson

Eric Frierson

Sr. Director, Field Engineering, EBSCO
Hey! I'm the team lead for library services engineering and integration for EBSCO. This means I can answer any question you might have about integrating EDS or the EDS API into your library and campus. I'm also a developer, building applications that use our API in outside-of-the-box... Read More →
avatar for Ellie Collier

Ellie Collier

Library Services Engineer, EBSCO
As a Library Service Engineer at EBSCO, I help libraries get the most out of EBSCO's Discovery Service. Prior to joining EBSCO, I worked for almost 10 years as a Reference and Instruction Librarian in a variety of academic institutions. I was also a co-founder and editor of the Open... Read More →



Tuesday November 5, 2019 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Salon II, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

1:00pm

Learning by Listening: Identifying User Needs through Semi-Structured Interviews
Registration Cost: $150

To meet the evolving needs of today’s scholars, libraries and publishers are designing a proliferation of new services and researcher platforms. In the April 18, 2019 Scholarly Kitchen post, Lettie Conrad provides this key point of caution: “If we are not investing in our working knowledge of researcher experiences, we are undoubtedly making uneducated assumptions and defaulting to outdated or self-serving modes of decision making.” In order to create services that will align with the changing workflows of researchers, librarians and scholarly communication practitioners can use the semi-structured qualitative interview method as a valuable tool for capturing the emerging needs of researchers.

This preconference workshop will focus on using semi-structured qualitative interviews to gain intel on researchers’ needs, expectations, and experiences to help improve or advance library services. Using hands-on exercises, you will gain skills spanning the logistics of interviewing from start to finish including identifying interview participants, developing interview questions, strategies for asking questions and moving through the interview experience, data capture techniques, and options for preparing the data for analysis. Based on our own experiences using semi-structured qualitative interviews, the presenters will share lessons learned and practical advice for those who are considering user-based research projects at their own organizations. We will discuss the benefits, challenges, and limitations of using interviews to learn about the workflows and needs of researchers.

Speakers
avatar for Alex Carroll

Alex Carroll

Librarian for STEM Research, Vanderbilt University Libraries
Alex Carroll, MSLS, AHIP, is the Librarian for STEM Research at the Vanderbilt University Jean and Alexander Heard Libraries. Alex serves as a liaison librarian for the School of Engineering and STEM academic units within the College of Arts and Science, supporting the research of... Read More →
avatar for Bertha Chang

Bertha Chang

Associate Head, Collections & Research Strategy, NC State University Libraries
Bertha Chang is Associate Head of Collections & Research Strategy at the North Carolina State University Libraries. She holds an M.S. from the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign, and an S.B. and Ph.D. from the Department... Read More →
avatar for Hilary Davis

Hilary Davis

Department Head, Collections & Research Strategy, North Carolina State University Libraries
Hilary Davis is Department Head, Collections & Research Strategy at the North Carolina State University Libraries in Raleigh, NC. Her primary role is to provide leadership and direction in the Libraries’ overall collection development strategies, and play a leading role in the Libraries... Read More →
avatar for Colin Nickels

Colin Nickels

Experiential Learning Services Librarian, NC State University
Colin Nickels is the Experiential Learning Services Librarian at NC State University Libraries where he oversees the Libraries’ Makerspace and VR/AR programs. He received his Masters in Information Science from UNC Chapel Hill.


Tuesday November 5, 2019 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Ashley Room, Courtyard Marriott Hotel 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

1:00pm

Selecting for Usability and Accessibility: A deep dive
Registration Cost: $150

Libraries want and expect great content that's discoverable and accessible to all. Increasingly, libraries are under the gun to provide universally accessible interfaces for users, and the selection process is a great time for evaluating what products bring with them when they come out of the box. What are some practical steps any professional involved in the selection process can use to ensure the interfaces and content is fulfilling that vision? This deep dive workshop builds a foundation of accessibility and usability best practices and includes hands-on activities. Participants will walk away knowing how to identify accessibility and usability issues in interfaces and the tools to communicate them professionally. No experience with web development is required, and all levels of experience are welcome.

Speakers
avatar for Julia Caffrey

Julia Caffrey

Web Services Librarian, Towson University



Tuesday November 5, 2019 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Salon I, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm

Refreshment Break
Sponsored by Adam Mattthew

Join us for afternoon refreshments at the Vendor Showcase! Visit booths and browse while you eat. Food and beverage stations will be located inside the exhibit hall in the Gaillard Center Grand Ballroom, and will be provided for preconferences scheduled at the Courtyard Marriott as well.

Sponsors
avatar for Adam Matthew

Adam Matthew

Adam Matthew Digital publishes unique collections from archives around the world. We reimagine primary sources, to empower current and future generations to challenge, analyse and debate. 


Tuesday November 5, 2019 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Grand Ballroom, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

4:00pm

Welcome Reception
Sponsored by the Modern Language Association (MLA)

Join us at the Vendor Showcase for wine and appetizers to start the Conference off right! Meet friends, network and mingle.

The reception will also feature a fun photo booth in the lobby area of the Gaillard Center. Come by to have your picture snapped with friends and colleagues using fun props, and take home a souvenir photo strip.

Sponsors
avatar for Modern Language Association

Modern Language Association

The MLA International Bibliography with Full Text, published by the Modern Language Association, is a database of books and articles published on languages, literatures, folklore, film, and linguistics.


Tuesday November 5, 2019 4:00pm - 6:00pm
Grand Ballroom, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

5:00pm

Juried Product Development Forums
Advanced Registration Required: Invitations will be emailed to all librarian attendees. If you do not receive your invitation, please contact Caroline Goldsmith (caroline@charlestonlibraryconference.com).

The Forums are focus groups designed for publishers and vendors to gather market input from librarians on the development of a particular product or service, and for librarians to discuss market issues with publishers and vendors invited to participate in a forum.The Forum sessions for librarians are intended for library staff and will be closed to other publishers and vendors. Invitations will be sent to registered library workers by email, and there will be a staffed sign-up table at the Conference for attendees to register on-site. In addition, publishers & vendors may invite their customers to sign up for this event. Distributors, consultants or individuals from other companies will be admitted if the participating publisher or vendor has added their name to the list of attendees for their session.Publishers and vendors have a unique opportunity for feedback from librarians regarding the design, features, feasibility or pricing of a particular product or service that addresses internal debates and shortens the sales cycle.

Tuesday November 5, 2019 5:00pm - 6:15pm
TBA

6:00pm

Charleston Culinary Tour
Cost: $75
Register Now

Get a taste of Charleston’s many flavors during your culinary adventure with Charleston Culinary Tours. The tour features some of Charleston’s iconic, award-winning restaurants. At each stop, participants will sample local fare while learning about Lowcountry Cuisine both past and present. You must register ahead of time - please use the link above.



Tuesday November 5, 2019 6:00pm - 8:30pm
TBA

7:00pm

First Time Attendees and Up & Comers Reception
We're inviting all first-time attendees of the conference, as well as any "Up and Comer" award winners that are attending to join us for a welcome reception. Our conference mentors and some of our conference directors will be there to say hello, and to answer questions you may have in advance of the main conference.

Sponsors
avatar for Better World Books

Better World Books

We believe in the power of knowledge. We don’t just support global literacy, we make it free and easy for you to get involved.  


Tuesday November 5, 2019 7:00pm - 9:00pm
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

9:30pm

Charleston Ghost and Graveyard Tour
A walking tour with exclusive access to many of Charleston’s most infamous and haunted sites.  Join them for a chilling good time, if you dare!

Cost: $25

Register Online

Tuesday November 5, 2019 9:30pm - 11:00pm
TBA
 
Wednesday, November 6
 

7:00am

Registration Check-In
PLEASE NOTE: Location is in the Upper Lobby of the Francis Marion Hotel. Conference registration is NOT AVAILABLE at the Gaillard Center. Vendor badges for booth will be located in your packet on your assigned table for the vendor showcase.

Check in upon arrival to receive your conference badge and attendee materials. Conference badges will be required for entry into conference venues, the reception, and conference shuttles.
The desk will be open the following hours:

Monday, 11/4, 7:00 am - 7:00 pm
Tuesday, 11/5, 7:00 am – 7:00 pm
Wednesday, 11/6, 7:00 am – 7:00 pm
Thursday, 11/7, 7:00 am – 6:00 pm
Friday, 11/8: CLOSED (All registration materials will be moved to the Information Desk on the Mezzanine Level of the Francis Marion Hotel)

Wednesday November 6, 2019 7:00am - 7:00pm
Upper Lobby, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

7:15am

Continental Breakfast
Join us for a light breakfast prior to the morning plenary sessions.

Sponsors
avatar for ATG Media

ATG Media

ATG Media is the group that includes the Charleston Conference, Against the Grain, a series of short, open access e-books titled "Charleston Briefings: Trending Topics for Information Professionals", and the "Charleston Voices" monograph series.  ATG Media is a wholly owned subsidiary... Read More →


Wednesday November 6, 2019 7:15am - 8:15am
Outside Grand Ballroom, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

8:15am

Welcome and Announcements
Opening of the 2019 Charleston Conference!

Wednesday November 6, 2019 8:15am - 8:20am
Performance Hall, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

8:20am

Opening Keynote: Building Trust When Truth Fractures
In our current era of disinformation, ready access to trustworthy sources is critical. “Fake news,” sophisticated disinformation campaigns, and propaganda distort the common reality, polarize communities, and threaten open democratic systems. What citizens, journalists, and policymakers need is a canonical source of trusted information. For millions, that trusted source resides in the books and journals housed in libraries, curated and vetted by librarians. Yet today, as we turn inevitably to our screens for information, if a book isn’t digital, it is as if it doesn’t exist.

To address this gap, the Internet Archive is actively working with the world’s great libraries to digitize their collections and to make them available to users via controlled digital lending, a process whereby libraries can loan digital copies of the print books on their shelves. By bringing millions of missing books and academic literature online, libraries can empower journalists, researchers, and Wikipedia editors to cite the best sources directly in their work, grounding readers in the vetted, published record, and extending the investment that libraries have made in their print collections.

Moderators
avatar for Courtney McAllister

Courtney McAllister

Library Services Engineer, EBSCO Information Services

Speakers
avatar for Brewster Kahle

Brewster Kahle

Founder and Digital Librarian, Internet Archive
A passionate advocate for public Internet access and a successful entrepreneur, Brewster Kahle has spent his career intent on a singular focus: providing Universal Access to All Knowledge. He is the founder and Digital Librarian of the Internet Archive, one of the largest libraries... Read More →


Wednesday November 6, 2019 8:20am - 9:15am
Performance Hall, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

9:15am

Cynthia Graham Hurd Memorial Scholarship Presentation
Cynthia Graham Hurd was a librarian for over 31 years in Charleston public and academic libraries. She worked as the branch manager of the popular St. Andrews Regional Library, and as a part-time reference librarian at the College of Charleston. On June 17, 2015, her life ended when a lone gunman entered the historic Emanuel AME Church and killed nine people during a prayer meeting. Cynthia is remembered as a “tireless servant of the community who spent her life helping residents, making sure they had every opportunity for an education and personal growth.”

Springer Nature is proud to honor the legacy of Cynthia Graham Hurd by awarding a scholarship to a librarian who has demonstrated an active interest in the profession, but has not had an opportunity to attend the Charleston Library Conference due to lack of institutional funding.

Wednesday November 6, 2019 9:15am - 9:25am
Performance Hall, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

9:25am

A Collaborative Imperative? Libraries and the Emerging Scholarly Communication Future
We’re in a period of rapid transition. Libraries are focusing on decisions, strategies, and choices that are best for their home institutions, yet also driving change by collaborating in energetic new ways. This panel will review key new trends and challenges, including collaborative collections, transformative open access agreements, and consortial experimentation, highlighting opportunities for both libraries and consortia.

Moderators
avatar for Beth Bernhardt

Beth Bernhardt

Consortia Account Manager, Oxford University Press/ Previously at UNC Greensboro
Beth works for Oxford University Press as a Consortia Account Manager. Before coming to OUP she was the Assistant Dean for Collection Management and Scholarly Communications at UNC Greensboro. Beth has served as the Principle Program Director for the Charleston Conference since... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Lorcan Dempsey

Lorcan Dempsey

Vice President, Membership and Research, Chief Strategist, OCLC
Lorcan coordinates strategic planning and oversees Research, Membership and Community Relations at OCLC. He has worked for library and educational organizations in Ireland, the UK and the US. His influence on national policy and library directions is widely recognized.In 2010 he received... Read More →
avatar for Jason S. Price

Jason S. Price

Director of Licensing Services, SCELC
avatar for Alicia Wise

Alicia Wise

Director & Consultant, Information Power Ltd
Open access, open science, society publishing, library publishing, research policy, publisher relations, library relations, funder relations, strategic partnerships



Wednesday November 6, 2019 9:25am - 10:15am
Performance Hall, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

10:15am

Refreshment Break
Wednesday November 6, 2019 10:15am - 10:45am
Outside Grand Ballroom, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

10:45am

CARLI Counts: Analytics in Consortium
CARLI Counts is a continuing education library leadership immersion program that prepares librarians to make effective use of research findings on the impact of academic libraries on student success for the twin purposes of service development and library advocacy. Program participants will learn how to use local library data analytics in alignment with institutional data, goals, and strategic priorities to improve their services and demonstrate their value. CARLI Counts is a program developed by the Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois, a Consortium dedicated to offering support to libraries with resource sharing and staff development. It serves as a model for how consortia grants can be used to kickstart multiple analytics projects within a state or region. This session will give an overview of what CARLI is doing with a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), Laura Bush 21st Century Librarian Program. This presentation will also include a portfolio of local case studies as examples of what kinds of projects individual academic libraries of various sizes and types can do with data and analytics. The program aims to equip libraries to use evidenced based analytics to show how library services and resources impact student success and to use data and analytics to know how to improve services and evaluate what resources are being offered. CARLI Counts is developing the program to be a replicable state/regional training model for equipping librarians to be campus leaders in assessing library impact on student learning and success. The presentation will be followed by a short Q&A session. Come for a preview of what the program is doing now!

Speakers
avatar for Stephanie Davis-Kahl

Stephanie Davis-Kahl

Collections & Scholarly Communications Librarian, Illinois Wesleyan University
Stephanie Davis-Kahl is the Collections & Scholarly Communications Librarian and Professor at The Ames Library at Illinois Wesleyan University. She provides leadership for collections management and scholarly communication programs, including Digital Commons @ IWU. She is the liaison... Read More →
avatar for Lisa Hinchliffe

Lisa Hinchliffe

Professor/Coordinator for Information Literacy Services and Instruction in the University Library, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
avatar for Kimberly Shotick

Kimberly Shotick

Assistant Dean for User Services and Outreach, Illinois Institute of Technology
Kimberly Shotick is the Assistant Dean for User Services and Outreach at Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago Illinois. She previously held the position of eLearning Librarian and Reference Coordinator at the Ronald Williams Library of Northeastern Illinois University (NEIU... Read More →
avatar for Anne  Craig

Anne Craig

Director, Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois (CARLI)
Since July of 2016, Anne Craig has had the privilege of serving as the Senior Director at CARLI, the Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois, a unit of the University of Illinois System. CARLI members include 128 academic and research libraries ranging in size and... Read More →



Wednesday November 6, 2019 10:45am - 11:25am
Laurens Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

10:45am

Developing a Framework for Measuring Reuse of Digital Library Collections: Discovery, Assessment, and Sharing
We measure the ‘use’ of assets in our digital collections. But we rarely measure their ‘reuse’ in social media contexts, digital exhibits, virtual reality environments, and marketing materials. What are we missing when we do not utilize all the metrics available to us? How can be demonstrate value and impact of our collections if we cannot showcase all aspects of usage of our assets? And what are the definitions of ‘use’ and ‘reuse’ in this new context?In 2017, the Digital Library Federation Assessment Interest Group (DLF-AIG) sought to define the concept of ‘reuse’ through an IMLS- grant funded project (LG-73-17-0002-17) titled Developing a Framework for Measuring Reuse of Digital Objects. The goal of the grant was to provide an in-depth needs assessment of cultural heritage knowledge organizations (CHKO) to determine functional requirements and use cases for the development of a reuse assessment toolkit as defined by the community itself. In short, the time arrived to interrogate the myriad ways in which users interact with our resources and offer opportunities to move beyond traditional library metrics and focus on transformational use.Since the original grant, in 2019, the same Project Team received a second IMLS-grant (LG-36-19-0036-19) titled “Digital Content Reuse Assessment Framework Toolkit (D-CRAFT) with a goal of developing the toolkit for which we gathered functional requirements, provide resources, recommended practices, and use cases for sustainably measuring and evaluating the reuse of digital assets held by CHKOs. D-CRAFT will support the use of evidence-based approaches to build and improve on inclusive, user-centered platforms, systems, and collections. In the digital library environment, we talk about and measure many things. However, ‘reuse’ of assets is not often part of the conversation. These grants demonstrate that these metrics are imperative to cultivating a compelling story of enduring value.

Speakers
avatar for Caroline Muglia

Caroline Muglia

Co-Associate Dean for Collections, University of Southern California
Caroline Muglia is the Co-Associate Dean for Collections at University of Southern California (USC). In this capacity, she also manages collection assessment and resource sharing initiatives at the Libraries.



Wednesday November 6, 2019 10:45am - 11:25am
Cypress Ballroom South, Courtyard Marriott Hotel 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

10:45am

New usage reports, new insights! How to use your COUNTER data in decision making process
Librarians will have been receiving COUNTER Release 5 reports since February and are becoming familiar with the new robust usage data. In this timely session, two analytics experts will explain how the new usage reports provide greater clarity and how they give insight into users’ actions. The presenters will show how to make the best use of the new reports, how to read them, how to interpret the data and how to use the data effectively in decision making process. They will define the new terminology such as ‘Unique_Item_Requests’, ‘Unique_Item_Investigations’, ‘Unique_Title_Requests’ and ‘Unique_Title_Investigations’. They will explain how these metrics provide comparability across journal and e-book platforms, A&I databases and full text databases. Q&A will be an important part of this practical session, and the presenters look forward to sharing tips and answering questions.

Speakers
avatar for Sonja Lendi

Sonja Lendi

Usage Research Manager, Elsevier
I've been with Elsevier since 1991 and have been responsible for the usage reports for ScienceDirect since 1998. Between 2012 and 2016, I was part of the COUNTER Executive Committee, and I was part of the COP5 working group. I support customers and sales with usage reports and in... Read More →
avatar for Athena Hoeppner

Athena Hoeppner

Discovery Services Librarian, University of Central Florida Libraries
avatar for Kornelia  Junge

Kornelia Junge

Senior Research Manager, Wiley
I have been with Wiley since 1998 and working on usage statistics since 2001. I am a member on the COUNTER Executive Committee and the COUNTER Technical Advisory Group, and have been on the COUNTER 5 working group. My main interest is on developing meaningful metrics and ensuring... Read More →



Wednesday November 6, 2019 10:45am - 11:25am
Grand Ballroom 1, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

10:45am

Tools and infrastructure for managing the collective collection
As academic libraries invest time and resources in coordinating the management of local collections, it is crucial that we develop tools to effectively and efficiently compare those collections and communicate about retention decisions. Gold Rush is one example of a tool that can help libraries think strategically about their local collections in the context of a broader regional or national collection. Originally developed by the Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries to help members of the Alliance Shared Print Trust compare monograph holdings, Gold Rush is now being used by multiple consortia for a range of projects. In this presentation, we will share examples of the creative ways that Gold Rush is being used to help libraries manage their collections in a networked setting. Librarians from the Colorado Alliance will describe the development of the tool and describe how it is being used there. Ivy Plus will discuss a dataset feasibility study in which libraries analyzed unique and overlapping holdings between collections for a five-year data sample.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Levine-Clark

Michael Levine-Clark

Dean, University of Denver Libraries
avatar for George Machovec

George Machovec

Executive Director, Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries and Managing Editor, ccAdvisor, Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries
I am the executive director of the Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries. My expertise revolves around library consortia, shared print programs, union catalogs and e-resource licensing. I am the managing editor of The Charleston Advisor/ccAdvisor.
avatar for Gabrielle Wiersma

Gabrielle Wiersma

Director of Scholarly Resource Development, University of Colorado Boulder
avatar for Elizabeth Mengel

Elizabeth Mengel

Associate Director Collections and Academic Services, Johns Hopkins University Libraries
I am the Associate Director for Collections and Academic Services. I concentrate on developing strategies for long term sustainable collections and delivering services to our constituents that support their research and teaching.


Wednesday November 6, 2019 10:45am - 11:25am
Grand Ballroom 3, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

10:45am

Accessibility for Digital Materials: The Current Landscape
Accommodating users with disabilities is not a new endeavor for libraries. However, the evolving landscape of content digitization and the shifting nature of the scholarly communication eco-system presents new challenges for libraries attempting to adhere to institutional policies and meet legal requirements regarding online accessibility for those users. The LYRASIS accessibility survey was conducted in the winter/spring of 2019 as a mechanism to better understand how (primarily academic) libraries within the Unites States are handling accessibility for their online content, and more specifically, where they stand in terms of policy and implementation. The core output of this survey is the 2019 LYRASIS Accessibility Survey Report. The report identified trends across a wide range of libraries. Moreover, the report exposed the need to review the current accessibility landscape to determine current initiatives and foster greater discussion about possible collaboration. This presentation will include a brief synopsis of the report and its key findings, an outline of current initiatives, and a panel presentation. Panelists current include:
• Jill Grogg, Strategist, Content & Scholarly Communication Initiatives, LYRASIS
• Heidi Schroeder, Accessibility Coordinator, Michigan State University

Other panelists are being identified in order to provide the broadest possible representation to investigate the following questions:
• What initiative are you working on in terms of accessibility for academic libraries?
• Why is this initiative so very important, and what makes it stand apart from previous initiatives?
• Do you see a way for individual libraries to incorporate your work into their workflows?
• What do you see as the most important information/skill set that libraries need to know to advance the cause of accessibility?

Speakers
avatar for Heidi Schroeder

Heidi Schroeder

Accessibility Coordinator, Michigan State University
Heidi Schroeder has been a librarian at the Michigan State University Libraries since 2007. She currently serves as the Accessibility Coordinator. Heidi's professional interests include: accessibility, collections, and affordable course materials/textbooks. Heidi lives in East Lansing... Read More →
avatar for Jill Grogg

Jill Grogg

Strategist, Content & Schol Comm Initiatives, LYRASIS
Jill Grogg is a Strategist with the Content & Scholarly Communication Initiatives team at LYRASIS. Previously, she was electronic resources coorindator at The University of Alabama Libraries for over a decade.


Wednesday November 6, 2019 10:45am - 11:25am
Carolina Ballroom A, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

10:45am

From big ideas to real talk: A front-line perspective on new collections roles in times of organizational restructuring
Many academic libraries across North America are undertaking major organizational restructuring, bringing significant change to how collections work is done. Many institutions have implemented a centralized collection development model, in which functional librarians are tasked with collections responsibilities across entire faculties, not just in a specific area of subject expertise. Change management conversations often focus on the big picture of organizational restructuring, but what do these changes look like for front-line librarians in their day-to-day work? Join three collections development librarians working at different stages of organizational restructuring for a discussion about organisational change from a front-line perspective. We will discuss strategies for learning our new roles, professional development needs and opportunities, and navigating the challenges of professional change. Topics covered will include: communications within library units and outward to faculty and students; the re-examination of acquisitions methods and models (such as EBA, DDA, or large eBook packages) in light of organizational change; and processes for establishing and evaluating effective workflows within and across functional teams.

Speakers
SS

Sally Sax

Collections Librarian, Carleton University
I am a collections librarian for business, public affairs, and legal studies. Talk to me about collection development, change management, privacy, copyright, and food.
avatar for Meg Ecclestone

Meg Ecclestone

Collections & Content Librarian, University of Guelph Library
I am a Collections Librarian at the University of Guelph, in the areas of Social Sciences and Business. Talk to me about: eBooks, business librarianship, social sciences librarianship, collections assessment, open access, and dismantling capitalism.
AS

Alana Skwarok

Collections Librarian, Carleton University
I am a Collections Librarian for the Arts and Social Sciences at Carleton University in Ottawa, ON.



Wednesday November 6, 2019 10:45am - 11:25am
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

10:45am

Going Through the Looking Glass: Re-envisioning Collections at the University of Houston
With significant annual price increases for subscription content and scarce resources becoming the norm for academic libraries across the world, we must question and adapt our traditional collections approaches in order to be sustainable. The University of Houston Libraries has embraced a new collections philosophy that prioritizes access to research materials over ownership. This shift has resulted in revised staffing models that rely on teams rather than subject liaisons to manage collections holistically, and new strategies including time-limited subscriptions, cost-sharing arrangements with academic departments, patron driven acquisition for print monographs, and the creation of an ongoing ROI-based assessment process for resource renewals.

This presentation will detail the reasons for the philosophical shift, our change management strategies, and lessons learned. We will also discuss how we have engaged with both our library stakeholders and our campus community as our collections services have evolved. We aim to provide a practical road map for evolving collections services, within the context of the current scholarly communications in higher education landscape. Presenters will encourage attendees to consider the applicability of approaches discussed to their home institutions through a variety of interactive strategies.

Speakers
avatar for Kerry Creelman

Kerry Creelman

Head of Liaison Services, University of Houston Libraries
Kerry Creelman is an associate librarian and the head of liaison services at the University of Houston Libraries. Her professional interests include the library’s role in supporting the university’s research & teaching mission and leadership & management in libraries.
NL

Nancy Linden

Collections Coordinator, University of Houston
avatar for Nora Dethloff

Nora Dethloff

Head of Research Materials Procurement, University of Houston Libraries
Nora Dethloff is the Head of Research Materials Procurement at the University of Houston's M.D. Anderson Library, where she oversees ILL, Acquisitions, and Electronic Resources. Her research interests include OA, OER, and copyright in libraries. She has presented at state, regional... Read More →



Wednesday November 6, 2019 10:45am - 11:25am
Gold Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

10:45am

Open and Impactful – Using Web of Science to Reveal Your Institution’s Open Access Footprint
Sponsored by Web of Science

Web of Science is the world’s most authoritative resource for search and discovery within scientific and scholarly literature. However, it has always provided more than the search alone.

More recently, through a partnership with Impactstory, now Our Research, Web of Science provides article-level detail across 34,000 journals for about 12.8 million items identified as existing in an Open Access status, along with links to this OA full text. Not only does this make access to free, legal article PDFs simple for faculty, researchers, and students, but it also enables librarians to do analysis of Open Access content associated with institutions.

Here, we will use Web of Science and InCites Benchmarking & Analytics to analyze the citation impact of Open Access content from a university. We’ll look at this from a variety of perspectives, faculty authored OA content associated with disciplines and funders for example. Gain insight into just how libraries can use these data to understand institutional support of Open Access initiatives and the presence of OA content within their journal collections.

Speakers
avatar for Jeff Dougherty

Jeff Dougherty

Solutions Specialist, Web of Science Group -- Clarivate Analytics
Jeff has an extensive background within the scholarly and academic information industry – 27+ years with Web of Science Group (Clarivate Analytics) and its predecessor organizations dating back to the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI). During this time he’s held positions... Read More →


Wednesday November 6, 2019 10:45am - 11:25am
Colonial Ballroom, Embassy Suites Hotel 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

10:45am

Pain Points and Solutions: Bringing Data for Startups to Campus
Entrepreneurship is growing as a cross- and inter-disciplinary area of focus for universities and libraries. In 2017, ARL SPEC Kit 355: “Campus-wide Entrepreneurship” by Armann-Keown and Bolefsk found that 83% of ARL libraries indicated that their institution identified expanding innovation and entrepreneurship as a strategic priority for the university. From patent and tech transfer offices to business, science, and engineering programs, the demand for entrepreneurship resources and support delivered via libraries is booming. Building library collections to help patrons design, launch, and run successful businesses is challenging: Market research and private equity/venture capital resources arrive at premium prices. Increasingly, these resources must interoperate with software used to clean, analyze, and visualize data. This data is often difficult to find and deploy. Restrictive, corporate-style licenses reflect that vendors do not understand the academic market’s access requirements or licensing constraints. This session will consist of three sections: First, the speakers will share a framework for how to understand entrepreneurship in higher education, and explain the types of information commonly requested by users. Such information often exists in disciplinary silos, emphasizing the importance of collaborative collection development across subject lines. Second, the speakers will explore the unique challenges to building collections that serve patrons developing new ventures. This includes collaborating with external stakeholders to fund resources that have not been traditionally purchased by libraries. Strategies for licensing data and other e-resources in this space will be discussed, including the central complications arising from universities as incubators for for-profit startups. The third section will include best practices for building relationships with stakeholders, developing relevant collections and services, and marketing these resources to your communities. The speakers will give examples of strategies and solutions they have used to bring new resources to their campuses in an era typified by flat/decreasing collections budgets.

Speakers
avatar for Kelly LaVoice

Kelly LaVoice

Business Information Librarian for Collections, Vanderbilt University
Kelly is the Business Research Librarian for Collections at Vanderbilt University and serves as liaisons to faculty in the Finance, Operations, and Strategy departments at the Owen School of Management. She previously worked at Cornell University, both as a Business Research Librarian... Read More →
avatar for Daniel Hickey

Daniel Hickey

Librarian for Business & Economics, New York University
Daniel's research focuses on the intersection of information seeking behavior and needs of business students, with a particular emphasis on career information literacy and MBA candidates. He did his graduate work at the University of Pittsburgh's School of Information Science, and... Read More →
avatar for Mark Williams

Mark Williams

Head of Collections Services, Massey Law Library, Vanderbilt University
Mark Williams is the Head of Collections Services and Lecturer in Law for Vanderbilt Law School’s Massey Law Library.Along with overseeing the law library’s collections services department Williams teaches courses in Advanced Legal Research in Business and Securities, Legal Practice... Read More →


Wednesday November 6, 2019 10:45am - 11:25am
Ashley Room, Courtyard Marriott Hotel 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

10:45am

Tackling the University Press eBook Collection Management Problem: The De Gruyter University Press eBooks Pilot Project
It was 2014 and all looked bleak for libraries that wanted to purchase entire university press frontlist ebook collections with multi-user rights. The availability of university press frontlist ebook titles was inconsistent and dwindling each year. This phenomenon was largely due to university presses’ uncertainty about which titles would become adopted for course use. They feared significant revenue loss through unsustainable collections pricing models and declining print sales.

The solutions tried by the university presses to deal with this fear were counterproductive. When presses removed the potential course adopted titles from DRM-free collections, they denied access to the titles to all institutions, not just those that adopted them for course use. Similarly, when they put a multiplied price for unlimited access on these titles, institutions that did not adopt them for course use were required to pay the same amount for unlimited access rights as those institutions that did adopt them. As a result, academic libraries that wanted to acquire entire collections of university presses were being forced to acquire each press’ ebook titles from multiple vendors, on multiple platforms, with varying usage rights, in multiple formats, on a title by title basis... Libraries were ready to give up._

A pilot project lead by De Gruyter was launched in 2015 in order to test an alternative model for acquisition of university press ebook collections that was fair and mutually agreeable by both the university presses, consortia as well as the libraries. After four years, the pilot is soon coming to a close. What has the data revealed? Did the alternative model deal with all of the challenges both the presses and the libraries were facing? What happens next after the pilot ends? These questions and more will be answered at this session.

Speakers
WY

Weijing Yuan

Head, Licensing and e-Resource Acquisitions, University of Toronto Libraries
avatar for Sharla Lair

Sharla Lair

Strategist, Content & Scholarly Communication Initiatives, LYRASIS
Sharla Lair serves as a Strategist for the Content & Scholarly Communication Initiatives team at LYRASIS. Sharla joined LYRASIS in 2015 after coordinating consortial eresource licensing and training for MOBIUS, a state-wide consortium in Missouri. Prior to MOBIUS, she worked for the... Read More →
avatar for Steve Fallon

Steve Fallon

Vice President of Americas and Strategic Partnerships, De Gruyter
BV

Brigitta van Rheinberg

Associate Director and Director of Global Development, Princeton University Press
I lead the IP department at PUP and together with our Digital and Audio Publisher would like to learn more about the library world, its promises, challenges, and strategies. I'm particularly interested in learning more about public libraries and libraries and how we, as mission driven... Read More →



Wednesday November 6, 2019 10:45am - 11:25am
Salon I, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

10:45am

Twelve Danishes for the Price of One: The Benefits of Bulk Acquisitions for Libraries
Whether you are at the grocery store buying an economy-size pack of pastries or acquiring scholarly content for an institution, when a product is sold in bulk, its price is lowered, ensuring that the customer receives the best value for their purchase. Librarians are utilizing bulk acquisitions to help maximize their shrinking budgets with more content for less money and are measuring their return on investment (ROI) by comparing the cost of the acquired research to patrons’ usage of the content. However, many other factors must be taken into consideration when measuring a library’s ROI, such as the overall quality and coverage of the content purchased and the additional human and technological resources needed to review, analyze, negotiate, integrate, and communicate the large volume of newly acquired content. Due to the limited funding that libraries are receiving, staff cuts are unfortunately inevitable and becoming an epidemic all over the world, all while the job responsibilities of each role are expanding and patron-driven demands continue to rise. Even as the industry has shifted into an electronic universe with endless data and analytical tools, human resources/staff still drive the majority of the daily functions and decision making within an institution’s library, making measuring the ROI of libraries critical to their success and survival. So how can libraries get the most from these bulk acquisitions? And how can publishers and aggregators better support them and see mutual benefits for themselves?

In this session, attendees will hear viewpoints from a librarian, publisher, and an aggregator on the benefits of bulk acquisitions compared to the title-by-title approach and ways these parties can come together to create innovative solutions for achieving a maximized ROI for libraries while also catering to the academic community by providing access to trusted peer-reviewed research.

Moderators
avatar for Scott Ahlberg

Scott Ahlberg

Chief Operations Officer, Reprints Desk
Scott has decades of experience in content, document delivery, and startup businesses, starting with Dynamic Information (EbscoDoc) in the 1980s, and later as an executive at Infotrieve. He has served in various roles at Reprints Desk since 2006, providing his expertise in operational... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Sara Tarpley

Sara Tarpley

Director of Academic Product Sales, Gale, a Cengage Company
Sara Tarpley, Director, Academic Product Sales has worked for Gale, Cengage Learning since 2002 and has held a variety of strategic roles in the organization. Her background includes work in the Human Resources, Customer Training, Marketing and Product Management departments of the... Read More →
avatar for Scott Pope

Scott Pope

Continuing Resources Librarian, Texas State University
Scott Pope is the Continuing Resources Librarian at Texas State University in San Marcos, Texas. In the role, Scott coordinates the acquisitions, renewals, and cancellations of databases and serials. Prior to this role, Scott was the Monographic Acquisitions Librarian at Texas State... Read More →
avatar for Jon Elwell

Jon Elwell

Director of Content Strategies, EBSCO Books
Jon Elwell is the Director of Content Strategies for EBSCO’s book program. In this role, Jon works with collection development librarians, profilers, subject matter experts, data analysts and others to curate, assess, enhance and acquire content to meet the acquisition needs of... Read More →
avatar for Nick Newcomer

Nick Newcomer

Senior Director of Marketing and Sales, IGI Global
Nick is the Senior Director of Marketing and Sales for IGI Global. With nearly a decade of experience in the publishing industry, he has played an integral part in the strategic conceptualization, implementation, execution, and analysis related to the marketing and sales of IGI Global’s... Read More →



Wednesday November 6, 2019 10:45am - 11:25am
Cypress Ballroom North, Courtyard Marriott Hotel 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

10:45am

“You Must Run Twice as Fast as That”: Using Insights from Researchers to Align Library Support to Researchers’ Needs
Many researchers expect little to no learning curve in discerning how our library can support their workflows and needs. Yet, we repeatedly find that they are unaware of the fullest scope of what we have to offer them in terms of collections, spaces, instruction, technology, events, and expertise. In an effort to learn about researchers’ needs both met and unmet as well as library services valued by researchers, the NC State University Libraries conducted two qualitative studies: (1) a local study as part of the Ithaka S+R project to support civil and environmental engineering scholars, and (2) a project spanning multiple types of researchers and disciplines at NC State University. Librarians conducted face-to-face semi-structured interviews to capture deep qualitative data. The first study took a deep dive into a specific engineering discipline with a focus on faculty, while the second adopted a broader approach by including researchers from undergraduate to late career faculty across many disciplines. In this presentation, we will share findings derived from the diversity of researcher needs uncovered in both studies. We will also share recommendations and next steps focusing on how to catalyze integration of library assets into researchers' workflows. Audience members will be invited to discuss practical ways to better expose researchers to library services and assets that span collections, spaces, instruction, technology, events, and expertise.

Speakers
avatar for Bertha Chang

Bertha Chang

Associate Head, Collections & Research Strategy, NC State University Libraries
Bertha Chang is Associate Head of Collections & Research Strategy at the North Carolina State University Libraries. She holds an M.S. from the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign, and an S.B. and Ph.D. from the Department... Read More →
avatar for Hilary Davis

Hilary Davis

Department Head, Collections & Research Strategy, North Carolina State University Libraries
Hilary Davis is Department Head, Collections & Research Strategy at the North Carolina State University Libraries in Raleigh, NC. Her primary role is to provide leadership and direction in the Libraries’ overall collection development strategies, and play a leading role in the Libraries... Read More →
avatar for Colin Nickels

Colin Nickels

Experiential Learning Services Librarian, NC State University
Colin Nickels is the Experiential Learning Services Librarian at NC State University Libraries where he oversees the Libraries’ Makerspace and VR/AR programs. He received his Masters in Information Science from UNC Chapel Hill.



Wednesday November 6, 2019 10:45am - 11:25am
Carolina Ballroom B, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

10:45am

Annotation on Campus: Collaboration in the Classroom and Beyond!
Collaboration in the classroom through the annotation of digital readings provides instructors with insight into how students engage with texts — including how they generate clarity around concepts and make broader connections with reading materials — and with opportunities to engage students directly in conversation on top of readings. Such activities also enable students to benefit from close-reading interaction with their peers. Learn how combining annotation with digital readings can benefit everyone in the classroom.Many may already be familiar with how collaborative annotation has been leveraged to improve pre- and post-publication workflows in scholarly communication. The same technology is used in higher education classrooms for similar interactions, making some of the most fundamental academic activities — reading, comprehending, and analyzing — visible, active, and social like never before. Collaborative annotation can be used in a number of ways to increase student engagement and outcomes through meaningful student-student and instructor-student interaction grounded in course readings. Students can help each other through difficult assignments and instructors can intervene and inspire as desired or necessary. Activated on top of texts delivered through the LMS and other learning platforms, annotation can also be used for formative or summative assessment.

Moderators
avatar for Heather Staines

Heather Staines

Director Business Development, MIT Knowledge Futures Group

Speakers
avatar for Butch Porter

Butch Porter

VP Partnerships, Hypothesis
avatar for Alan J. Reid

Alan J. Reid

Assistant Professor, English, Coastal Carolina University
Ask me about Hypothes.is!
avatar for Micah Vandegrift

Micah Vandegrift

Open Knowledge Librarian, North Carolina State University
Open. BBQ.


Wednesday November 6, 2019 10:45am - 11:25am
Citadel Green Room South, Embassy Suites Hotel 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

10:45am

Developing open access partnerships and transformative agreements
Cambridge University Press and the University of California have forged an unprecedented open access agreement, including UC’s cost-sharing model for researchers with grant support and defaulting all UC authors into open access with an option to publish behind a paywall as appropriate. We’ll discuss the breadth of our cooperative partnership: the alignment of our goals and philosophies, the contours of the final agreement, the design of the author workflow and the handling of shared payments, and the collaborative efforts between Cambridge and UC to socialize open access with researchers across the 10-campus system.

Speakers
avatar for Jen Maurer

Jen Maurer

Library Sales Manager, Cambridge University Press
avatar for Rice Majors

Rice Majors

Associate University Librarian, UC Davis
avatar for Mathew Willmott

Mathew Willmott

Open Access Collection Strategist, California Digital Library
AS

Andrew Sykes

Marketing Director, Strategic Projects, Cambridge University Press



Wednesday November 6, 2019 10:45am - 11:25am
Grand Ballroom 2, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

10:45am

Intriguing New Model for Improved Visibility of and Access to Theses and Dissertations
The Smathers Libraries at the University of Florida (UF) are participating in an innovative program to explore whether making theses and dissertations available in print through online retail sites can have positive impacts for graduates, the University and the general public. These works have substantial scholarly value and represent unique intellectual contributions that the University would like to make more visible. Digitization efforts and work with Access Innovations to enhance the metadata has vastly improved discoverability and ease of access for those searching University collections. However, through this project we will expose this research to audiences beyond academe—practitioners, corporate researchers, independent scholars and international readers. This session will describe how UF has worked with our corporate partner, Bibliolabs, to leverage online retailers’ discovery engines to promote print editions of this research and alert readers to the free digital versions available from our institutional repository, IR@UF. The Libraries are monitoring referred traffic to the IR and sales data and will report on how this initiative is affecting access to this scholarly output from UF graduates. The presentation will also share how alumni, current graduate students and other campus stakeholders have responded to this new opt-in service from the Libraries. Many UF graduates have embraced this program, believing that sharing research widely can lead to new opportunities for employment, funding and collaboration in a highly competitive environment. As the guest authors stated in the Scholarly Kitchen on April 17, 2019 (https://scholarlykitchen.sspnet.org/2019/04/17/challenges-and-opportunities-in-pre-published-research/?informz=1), “We’re seeing a generational shift as the world becomes increasingly fast-paced and digital, and early-career researchers are leading the charge in adopting (and expecting) a more open research approach.” UF is the first university to contribute content to this effort, but we expect others to follow suit if the data supports the expectations of the University, Libraries and graduates.

Speakers
avatar for Judith Russell

Judith Russell

Dean of University Libraries, University of Florida


Wednesday November 6, 2019 10:45am - 11:25am
Rutledge Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

10:45am

Harnessing the Market for the Benefit of All: Increasing Transparency and Other Emerging Possibilities for Ebook Accessibility
Over the last few years we have seen a flurry of activity aimed at improving the accessibility of ebooks in libraries. Inspired by wide-scale audits such as the Big 10 Academic Alliance and JISC, ebook platforms have been held to account and encouraged to improve the Accessibility of their services. Libraries have become better educated on Accessibility in service of their students and to help evaluate the products they choose to purchase. However, ensuring Accessibility for all requires a strong commitment from platforms and publishers, and publishers vary widely on the extent to which Accessibility is part of their publication workflows. If publishers aren’t taking the initiative to create accessible files, there is a limit to the usability of that content on any platform.

Given this reality, how can we continue to move the industry forward? How can libraries be assured that what they are buying is accessible to all? How can our industry exert more pressure on the supply chain to partner in achieving this goal? This panel will explore the various efforts underway to encourage increased transparency about Accessibility features and broader participation from publishers in creating Accessible ebooks. It will discuss the standardization efforts underway as well as new tools, certifications, and rating systems that create new possibilities for informed decision making and that could drive real progress toward ensuring accessibility for all.

Note: George Kerscher, Chief Innovations Officer, DAISY Consortium, contributed to the content and preparations for this session but isn't attending.

Speakers
avatar for Susan Doerr

Susan Doerr

Associate Director, University of Minnesota Press
Susan Doerr, the Associate Director at the University of Minnesota Press, is a twenty-two year publishing veteran with experience in literary, corporate, and scholarly publishing and distribution. Susan manages the Manifold Scholarship (www.manifoldapp.org) partnership with the CUNY... Read More →
avatar for Jeanne Masher

Jeanne Masher

Product Owner, eBooks, EBSCO Information Services
I’ve been a member of EBSCO’s eBook program since 2010, with a variety of roles along the spectrum that include publisher workflows and content ingestion, internal production operations, and ebook technology. As Product Owner in a content area that’s ever evolving, I strive... Read More →
avatar for Trisha  Prevett

Trisha Prevett

eLearning Librarian, Associate Professor, Southern New Hampshire University
Trisha has been with Southern New Hampshire University’s Shapiro Library beginning in 2014 as the Head of Reference Services and has been embedded in SNHU Global Campus since 2017 as an eLearning Librarian. Prior to SNHU, Trisha was a Reference Librarian at Nova Southeastern University... Read More →
avatar for Michael Johnson

Michael Johnson

Michael Johnson, Director of Content Partnerships, Benetech



Wednesday November 6, 2019 10:45am - 11:25am
Calhoun Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

10:45am

The BitViews project: can a blockchain application unchain Open Access? New solutions for an old problem.
BitViews is an open-source blockchain application that validates, aggregates, and disseminates online usage data of author’s approved manuscripts (AMs) deposited in open access repositories worldwide. The public ledger thus created provides reliable data to assess non-citation research impact, thereby incentivizing researchers to maximize visibility by releasing their open access AMs. The cost of the project is to be shared among libraries through a new crowdfunding mechanism.  

Speakers
avatar for Manfredi La Manna

Manfredi La Manna

Reader in Economics, University of St Andrews, UK
I have a long-standing interest in ScholComm and Open Access (I am one of the 16 original signatories of the Budapest OA Initiative) and I have a new solution to unblock OA on a worldwide basis (no less!). Warning: the presentation is a challenge to librarians and publishers. Come... Read More →



Wednesday November 6, 2019 10:45am - 11:25am
Drayton Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

10:45am

E-Resources Boot Camp
If you’re a new e-resources librarian (or want to be one), this session is for you!

Rather than focusing on one or two aspects of the e-resources librarian’s many responsibilities, this session provides an overview of the position. Topics include: the e-resources lifecycle; collection development; working with vendors; negotiating contracts; budget management; liaison responsibilities; e-resources workflows; streaming media; eBooks; ILSs and LSPs; usage assessment; remote authentication; technical setup and support; deciphering job profiles; and interview tips. Examples from diverse academic institutions will be used to provide context and a “real life” framework (and hopefully some comic relief).

Attendees will walk away with an understanding of all aspects of the e-resources position, which they can use to identify areas for further investigation. This session will be valuable to new librarians considering e-resources librarianship as a career path, as well as experienced librarians looking for a new direction.

Speakers
JM

Joe Marciniak

Electronic Resources Librarian, Princeton University


Wednesday November 6, 2019 10:45am - 11:25am
Salon II, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

10:45am

Open-source Publishing Software: A Landscape Analysis
In 2018 the Publishing Studies program at Simon Fraser University began working with MIT Press/Knowledge Futures Group to conduct an inventory and landscape analysis of all available open-source software in the scholarly publishing space, with the intention of producing a report that would inform adoption, investment, and decision-making around open publishing infrastructure. The proliferation of open-source platforms and projects in recent years suggests that an 'ecosystem' is emerging around and between these systems, including those that may evolve along competitive lines and those that will resolve into a service ‘stack’ of complementary technologies. Our report on this landscape analysis, released in summer 2019, catalogues more than fifty active open-source projects, spanning book, journal, and multimedia publishing, and representing a wide variety of perspectives and strategic approaches. Arising from this analysis are a number of interesting questions about sustainability, collaboration and integration, funding models, and the health of this 'ecosystem' in the large.

This session will present the findings of the analysis and provide an opportunity for discussion and reflection on the state of the ecosystem and directions for future development and coordination.

Speakers
avatar for John Maxwell

John Maxwell

Associate Professor, Publishing @ SFU, Simon Fraser University
Associate Prof and Director of the Publishing Studies program at Simon Fraser University. I teach and do research on the publishing industries and their ongoing encounter with the digital paradigm.


Wednesday November 6, 2019 10:45am - 11:25am
Citadel Green Room North, Embassy Suites Hotel 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

10:45am

Stopwatch Session 1
Downtown/uptown (dual campus) subject librarians at University of Central Florida Libraries (BarbaraTierney, Corinne Bishop) --- 

A new subject librarian model is being rolled out at the University of Central Florida whereby several subject librarians divide their time between two campuses. Five librarians now travel to the new downtown Orlando campus https://www.ucf.edu/downtown/ to provide library support for their assigned programs and constituencies that have relocated to the new campus, while also maintaining support for other assigned programs and constituencies that remain at main campus.

To reassure faculty and students transferred to the downtown campus that they still have library support, a special newsletter distributed to downtown constituencies states “although your subject librarians may remain based at the main campus, they will travel downtown to meet with you and your classes as needed and are also available online. Please contact them for library instruction, research assistance, one-on-one consultations, program reviews, and collection development via https://library.ucf.edu/services/services-for-faculty/ “

What are one subject librarian’s reflections on how the dual campus model impacts her? Dr. Corinne Bishop, social sciences subject librarian, now supports constituencies on two campuses. She works with library acquisitions, cataloging, and her downtown faculty to select books and other resources that should be moved to or ordered for the downtown library.

While maintaining her office at main campus, Dr. Bishop makes optimum use of downtown campus shared librarian offices and instruction/consultation rooms. She embeds herself in the Canvas learning management system of the courses she supports, and uses software such as Zoom and Skype to provide instruction sessions, workshops, and consultations to her constituencies wherever they, or she, is located.

UCF’s Head of RIS and the Social Sciences Subject Librarian will answer questions about the pros and cons of such a dual campus model as it relates to the institutions of program attendees. After participating in this program, attendees will be able to develop strategies to support similar situations at their own institutions.

Data Management and Visualization Lesson Plan for Graduate Students (Mary Ellen Sloane) ---
Libraries are finding the graduate students in all disciplines are facing increased need to better understand data science, data management, and data visualization. This often involves learning new software and new research methodologies.

At MTSU we have been offering a workshop series to graduate students for several years. The past year we added a workshop on data management and visualization to the series. This session will share an overview of the lesson plan and discuss other resources for developing lesson plans on data management and visualization for students. An emphasis will be placed on library resources and software training available that will be used by students in their research.

Attendees will come away with some strategies for helping graduate students navigate the steep learning curve of data management and visualization in all disciplines. The presenter will solicit feedback about the lesson plan in order to develop ideas for improvement.

You Can’t Have It All, Where Would You Put It?: Locating the Many Things in Shared Retention --- (Rebecca Crist)
As meta-collaborations of shared print programs begin to look at the collective shared, retained collection, we are increasingly interested in finding WHERE retained items are located. This presentation will attempt to parse the membership of serials-oriented shared print programs to determine who participates in these programs and where items are actually located in retention, with a goal of identifying the broad range of institution types and sizes participating in shared print programs—and figuring out which institutions are left holding the literal "many things" we have committed. Looking at the multiple regions of the US, are journals largely being held at large state universities, or is the burden—and opportunity—shared among many? Which regions stand out for their commitments? This brief look at research currently in progress will seek to answer the question, Where are we putting all our things?

ADBU - Sketching French academic libraries landscape: a Student focus ---- (Cécile Swiatek)
What do French collections, services, spaces look like? Presenting and analyzing national and local trends enables us to see what the strategies at work are and how French academic libraries serving students evolved during the last 10 years.
National key indicators compared to a european academic libraries KPI benchmark : As we are facing research evolutions and teaching/learning new models, a strong increase in students’ number is observed everywhere in Europe. This trend will most probably continue in the coming years and the pressure on academic libraries will grow. That is why the French academic libraries directors association (ADBU) took the initiative to launch a European comparative study on Key Performance Indicators in Academic Libraries over the 2013-2016 period, with a 2017 update.

E Pluribus Bibliothecam: Reforming Monograph Acquisitions through Data, Training, and Teamwork (Adam Beauchamp) ---

Responding to feedback from our faculty and data about our acquisitions patterns over the past three years, the FSU Libraries decided to change our approach to monograph acquisitions from a decentralized, primarily subject librarian-driven firm order model to a coordinated program that emphasizes automated purchasing. Our goals were to reduce librarians’ time and labor spent on title-by-title selecting, increase collection consistency and fill gaps in core subject matter frequently missed in slip notifications, and help manage the expectations of our users. This session will describe how we navigated this transition from decentralized selecting to a coherent monograph acquisitions program .

Attendees will learn about:
-- the formation of a coordinating committee to provide leadership; 
-- methods for analyzing our community’s monograph use in ways that could be directly applied to our book vendor's approval profiles (GOBI); and 
-- how we provided training to our subject librarians on how to interpret the data analytics, create a collection development strategy in their subject areas, and work collaboratively to build a coherent collection that meets the disciplinary and interdisciplinary needs of our students and faculty. 
Attendees will also receive the Excel template and formulas we used to analyze monograph usage should they wish to replicate our assessment method.

Moderators
avatar for Liya Deng

Liya Deng

Social Sciences Librarian, Eastern Washington University

Speakers
avatar for Barbara Tierney

Barbara Tierney

Head of Research & Information Services, University of Central Florida Libraries
Barbara is Head of Research and Information Services for the University of Central Florida Libraries (2013 to the present). She formerly served as the Head of Research and Information Services for the University of North Carolina, Charlotte (2011-2012). Barbara was an Invited... Read More →
avatar for Mary Ellen  Sloane

Mary Ellen Sloane

Science Librarian, Middle Tennessee State University
Mary Ellen Sloane is the Science Librarian and an Associate Professor at Middle Tennessee State University. Her research interests include scholarly communication, information literacy, library technology, and user experience.
RC

Rebecca Crist

Project Manager, Big Ten Academic Alliance
avatar for Adam Beauchamp

Adam Beauchamp

Humanities Librarian, Florida State University Libraries
CS

Cécile Swiatek

Secretary general, ADBU - French Academic Libraries Directors and Executives association
ADBU is the the French association of directors and senior staff in academic and research libraries
CB

Corinne Bishop

Social Sciences Subject Librarian, University of Central Florida Libraries
Librarian for Public Administration, Criminal Justice, Political Science, and Interdisciplinary Studies programs. Provide faculty and student support at the University of Central Florida's main campus in East Orlando and Downtown Campus.



Wednesday November 6, 2019 10:45am - 11:25am
Pinckney Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:30am

Lunch on your Own
Wednesday November 6, 2019 11:30am - 12:45pm
TBA

11:30am

Ex Libris Central Discovery Index: Putting Data Intelligence at the Core of Discovery Sponsored Lunch
RSVP Required
Sponsored by Ex Libris, a ProQuest Company

Ex Libris is unifying its discovery indexes to create a powerful new Central Discovery Index (CDI). Learn how it’s modern design, powered with data intelligence, will enable libraries to offer rich discovery and exploration services to meet changing user needs and expectations.

Speakers
avatar for Christine Stohn

Christine Stohn

Director Product Management, Ex Libris, a ProQuest Company
Christine Stohn is director of product management for discovery and delivery at Ex Libris. Christine has over 25 years of experience in the library and information industry, having worked on the content and data side before joining Ex Libris in 2001. In her current role Christine... Read More →
avatar for Jane Burke

Jane Burke

Vice President, Strategic Initiatives, ExLibris, a ProQuest company
Jane Burke, Vice President Strategic Initiatives, is one of the executive sponsors of Intota™, Serials Solutions web-scale management solution. In this role, she is providing strategic leadership and working closely with the development partners to deliver a world class library... Read More →


Wednesday November 6, 2019 11:30am - 12:45pm
39 Rue de Jean 39 John Street, Charleston, SC 29401

1:00pm

Keynote Plenary: Anticipating the Future of Biomedical Communications
The National Library of Medicine is poised to launch its third century of providing library services to serve science and society. The nature of scientific communications is changing, with rapid growth in archival literature, new artifacts of communication artifacts such as preprints, pipelines and data sets, and a scholarly and social public greater attuned to video and sound productions than to the printed word.  The NLM Director will describe the exciting steps the NLM is taking to prepare for this future, and identify critical challenges that can only be solved through partnerships between the NLM and the publishing community.

Moderators
avatar for Meg White

Meg White

Director, Technology Services, Rittenhouse Book Distributors, Inc.
Meg White is a 25-year veteran of the health sciences publishing industry. Her background includes various sales, marketing, and product development positions at Rittenhouse Book Distributors, Mosby, Williams & Wilkins, and Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. She... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Patricia Flatley Brennan

Patricia Flatley Brennan

Director, National Library of Medicine
Patricia Flatley Brennan, RN, PhD, is the Director of the National Library of Medicine (NLM), a component of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The NLM is the world’s largest biomedical library and the producer of digital information services used by scientists, health professionals... Read More →


Wednesday November 6, 2019 1:00pm - 1:45pm
Performance Hall, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

2:00pm

A Springboard to OER Success: How One State’s Higher Education Agencies and Academic Libraries are Working in Tandem to Create Greater Awareness of the Value of OER
As the national economy continues to grow, many states, such as Alabama, are having difficult filling all the jobs because they do not have the credentialed workers. To get more students in the education pipeline, government agencies and higher education institutions are collaborating to identify ways of making college more affordable and accessible, particularly for lower-income and first-generation students. Open Education Resources (OER) are a potential method of accomplishing both goals. Recognizing that fact, Alabama’s higher education agencies – the Alabama Commission on Higher Education (ACHE) and the Alabama Community College System – began providing numerous grants to institutions to increase awareness of the value of Open Education Resources (OER) in 2018. The grants were for a wide variety of uses, such as holding all-day OER conferences for faculty and staff at two- and four-year institutions, providing incentives to faculty who replaced commercial textbooks with OER for their courses, and even subsidizing an ACRL workshop on Open Access (OA). Along the way, both community college and university librarians played an active role in events and activities. During this session, an ACHE staff member will briefly describe and provide updates on the 2018-2019 ACHE-ACCS OER grant program, which was projected to impact over 18,000 students and saved them over $2,000,000. Afterwards, academic librarians from the University of North Alabama (UNA) and Athens State University will describe how their grants supported their institutions’ OER initiatives.
Attendees will leave this session with best practices for conducting a grant program, ideas for promoting OER on campus, and suggestions for customized training for faculty and staff.

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer L. Pate

Jennifer L. Pate

Scholarly Communications and Instructional Services Librarian, University of North Alabama
avatar for Ron Leonard

Ron Leonard

Director of Special Initiatives, Alabama Commission on Higher Education
For the last year, Ron Leonard has held the newly-created position of Director of Special Initiatives at the Alabama Commission for Higher Education. As such, he manages two, large statewide projects, a FAFSA completion project and an OER initiative, and several smaller projects... Read More →
avatar for Katherine Quinnell

Katherine Quinnell

Library Director, Athens State University


Wednesday November 6, 2019 2:00pm - 3:10pm
Pinckney Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:00pm

I don’t want to go among mad people: adventures in establishing good communication between subject librarians and technical service departments in a large academic library.
“But I don’t want to go among mad people,” Alice remarked. “Oh, you can’t help that,” said the cat: “we’re all mad here.” The first line of this quote sums up a general feeling library employee often have towards coworkers in other departments at institutions where job duties are siloed. This perspective results in poor communication and hesitancy to collaborate among departments. Long-term, this hesitancy leads to stereotyping employees of different departments as being difficult to work with, etc. The second line resonates with how the presenters view this mentality to think of colleagues – it doesn’t matter if they are “mad” because we all need to work together to succeed. And if we’re being honest with ourselves, aren’t we all a bit “mad?” Presenters are two librarians newer to the University of Tennessee Libraries who were thrown into leadership roles after a reorganization and decided to break down the siloed walls to achieve success in their departments. Presenters will describe an assessment conducted among subject librarians to determine how their roles and responsibilities for collection development shifted as a result of the reorganization and how technical service departments can best communicate with subject librarians to support their roles, as well as identify training that is needed to develop subject librarian skills related to their roles. This assessment is currently still in-process and presenters wish to conclude it before deciding how best to engage the audience. In whatever form that is, attendees will be active participants (possibly facilitated through a variety of antics to illustrate that we are all indeed “mad”). Attendees can expect to gain insight into how this process affected communication at the UT Libraries and how they can apply what was learned to similar situations in which problems occur because siloed departments create poor communication.

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Mezick

Jennifer Mezick

Collection Strategist, University of TN
avatar for Elyssa Gould

Elyssa Gould

Head, Acquisitions & Continuing Resources, University of Tennessee, Knoxville



Wednesday November 6, 2019 2:00pm - 3:10pm
Carolina Ballroom A, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:00pm

Snake News or Fake News? A Game Show About How Students Evaluate Scientific Information in Google Search Results
Congratulations! Your content is showing up in Google’s search results. Now students can find you more easily. But how are they evaluating your content as they look through the results? What makes them click on your result? What role does your title and snippet wording play in their perceptions? How does source recognition affect their credibility judgments? Can they tell if your content is a book, journal or blog? If these questions sound intriguing, come learn about the findings of an IMLS-funded research project, Researching Students’ Information Choices: Determining Identity and Judging Credibility in Digital Spaces. This study uses simulations of Google Search Engine Result Pages (SERPs), a think-aloud protocol, and interviews to capture student’s point of selection behavior and real-time cognition in action. One-hundred and seventy-five students, from elementary to graduate school, searched for resources for a science assignment (the impact of the Burmese Python on the Florida Everglades) and made judgments on the helpfulness, citability and credibility of the resources. They were also asked to identify the container of the information. This presentation will focus on the judgements from the 90 higher education students in the study. Among the SERPs the students reviewed, there are e-books, e-journals, magazines, preprints, websites, and news from major publishers and aggregators as well as library institutional repositories. Since the results are fascinating and fun, we are going to bring in the fun by presenting the results in a 1980s game show format. Contestants from the audience will see if they can predict student responses from the study, so come on down!

Speakers
avatar for Tara Tobin Cataldo, MLS

Tara Tobin Cataldo, MLS

Science Collections Coordinator, University of Florida
I am the Collections Coordinator at UF's Marston Science Library and subject specialist in the Biological and Life Sciences. I have been an academic librarian for 17 years and my research interests include information seeking behavior and usage patterns of library collections.
avatar for Amy Buhler

Amy Buhler

Engineering Librarian, University of Florida
My research interests are assessment of information seeking behaviors, library instruction, and marketing of library services.
avatar for Samuel Putnam

Samuel Putnam

Engineering Librarian, University of Florida
Samuel Putnam is an engineering librarian at the University of Florida where he is liaison to mechanical and aerospace engineering and is the director of the MADE@UF XR development lab. His research focuses on innovative and multimodal instruction practices as a means to promote information... Read More →
avatar for Christopher Cyr

Christopher Cyr

Associate Research Scientist, OCLC
Chris’s research looks at the ways that public services are provided to local communities. He is interested in the contrast between services from private businesses, and services from government entities like libraries. He has looked at this contrast in diverse contexts around the... Read More →


Wednesday November 6, 2019 2:00pm - 3:10pm
Cypress Ballroom North, Courtyard Marriott Hotel 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:00pm

The time has come for eBooks, or has it?
For many years, librarians and industry experts predicted that electronic books would surpass print books as the format of preference. The advantages that digital books provide seemed to all but guarantee the demise of print. But something happened along the way. Numerous studies during the last decade have demonstrated that print still has a place for libraries, vendors and most importantly, end users. So what’s happened – why hasn’t that time come like it has for journals? And will the ‘tipping point’ for books ever arrive?

One explanation is that eBooks have not met user expectations, but optimizing user experience when users range from students, to faculty, to librarians is a big challenge! Join us for a lively discussion about the user experience for eBooks from multiple perspectives. Gabrielle Wiersma from the University of Colorado Boulder will share unexpected findings from an eBook usability study with students and ask the audience to consider the reasons why they prefer one format over another. Then we’ll get the direct feedback from graduate students who will share their perceptions and format preferences. Finally, Leigh Beauchamp, Vice President of Product Development will discuss how ProQuest is making patrons the center of Ebook Central platform development and how eBooks are evolving to bring the most important elements of the print experience to digital book research.

The discussion will include thought provoking live polling questions and attendees should come prepared with their mobile devices - and honest opinions.

Speakers
avatar for Gabrielle Wiersma

Gabrielle Wiersma

Director of Scholarly Resource Development, University of Colorado Boulder
avatar for Leigh Beauchamp

Leigh Beauchamp

VP of Product Management, ProQuest
I lead Product Management for ProQuest Ebooks. I'd love to hear from you about your experience on the Ebook Central and ProQuest platforms; your thoughts on building the best collection of Ebooks content; and what you think are the most compelling commercial models.



Wednesday November 6, 2019 2:00pm - 3:10pm
Grand Ballroom 2, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

2:00pm

Enter Sandman: Licensing and Procurement Trends
Libraries face challenges to acquire and provide more and different content, as well as to meet user preference for new formats and demands for certain terms and conditions, all while simultaneously navigating a growing labyrinth of institutional regulations. Something as mundane as a change in the federal tax code or the implementation of a new enterprise system can force library acquisitions processes to come to a screeching halt. This discussion will bring together a panel spanning libraries, consortia, publishers, and vendors to go behind the curtain to look at organizational policy and procurement workflows, and to open a dialogue between all stakeholders to explore the changing landscape, priorities, and pressures on both sides of the library-vendor relationship when licensing content.

Speakers
KD

Ken DiFiore

Director, IDSP, Outreach & Participation, ITHAKA
avatar for Eric Sterkel

Eric Sterkel

Account Support Manager, SAGE
I have been with SAGE for 6 years now working to support our sales team with new and existing orders.
EL

Elizabeth Lightfoot

Electronic Resources Librarian, Florida International University
VB

Valerie Boulos

University Librarian, Florida State University
RE

Rachel Erb

Direct of E-Resources, Florida Academic Library Services Cooperative



Wednesday November 6, 2019 2:00pm - 3:10pm
Grand Ballroom 3, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

2:00pm

Legacy Missions in Times of Change: Defining and Shaping Collections in the 21st Century
Despite the rapidly changing information and technology landscape, collections continue to be at the heart of academic libraries, signifying their role in providing access to our cultural heritage. But in an increasingly networked, distributed, licensed environment, how do we define the library collection? What do collections imply? What is involved in building a collection? Part 1 -- Presentation: Collections Background The purpose of this presentation is to characterize the evolving nature of collections and to highlight some of the factors behind these changes and their impact on the notion of collections. The evolving nature of collections is a reflection on how collections are defined and what it means to build a collection or develop a collection policy given the current information ecology and trends in research and pedagogy. Part 2 -- Interactives: Live polling with real-time screen display of audience inputs Involving audience participation, the session will invite a lively discussion of how academic libraries with different sizes and budget are developing strategies to understand and meet the resource needs of their constituents. Session participants will see live-poll responses in real time on the shared presentation screen. Live-poll entries and discussion highlights will be captured and shared in the post-conference slides and proceedings.

Speakers
avatar for Antje Mays

Antje Mays

Director of Collections, University of Kentucky Libraries
Antje Mays, Director of Collections at University of Kentucky Libraries, leads collection management efforts in support of the University's growing academic programs and research activities. An experienced linguist, translator, and interpreter, she also serves as academic liaison... Read More →
avatar for Oya Y. Rieger

Oya Y. Rieger

Senior Advisor, Ithaka S+R
Oya Y. Rieger collaborates with Ithaka S+R’s Libraries, Scholarly Communication, and Museums program. She researches and advises on projects that reexamine the nature of collections within the research library, help secure access to and preservation of the scholarly record, and... Read More →



Wednesday November 6, 2019 2:00pm - 3:10pm
Citadel Green Room North, Embassy Suites Hotel 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

2:00pm

Library Collections: Creatively Adjusting Budgets to Invest in Open Content and Research Infrastructure
Building on the 2019 ACRL/SPARC Forum on Collective Reinvestment in Open Infrastructure, this program will explore how libraries can make different commitments to fund content created by open infrastructures.   Library collections increasingly promote and reflect such open content and many have chosen to contribute to funding those products.  There is not one formula or roadmap to underwrite the publishing and distribution costs of these open resources.  There are many variables and considerations as some open content corresponds to serials and others are books or monographs.  Open access content is increasingly found in nearly all subject areas, as scholarly publishing models have evolved.  Open access does not come without a price to create, maintain and preserve the outputs.  Libraries are reconsidering whether they want to commit so much to purchase materials or subscription-based products, when it is unclear what the anticipated use of any materials will be over time.  Planning and opportunities for new and more flexible decisions concerning adjustments to and expenditures of the materials budget are under exploration by libraries.  There are many options to invest in creating more content to be released as open access.  Such options include contributing financially from the Library collections or materials budget to subsidizing or covering APCs, engaging in a more “library as publisher” model hosting journals, publishing books, creating OERs, and offsetting other expenses that ultimately drive a more intensive open infrastructure.  Library leaders and partners will share their ideas about trying different approaches to contribute to more open publishing initiatives and explore whether efforts in deploying current book and serial costs to offset opportunities to build a wider and more open infrastructure is on the horizon.  This analysis should incorporate the costs of analytical tools necessary to the use of such content in today’s research.  Questions will be solicited ahead of time to reflect audience’s interest in such a rethinking of the library collections budget. Please email Julia Gelfand at <jgelfand@uci.edu> with your questions.

Speakers
avatar for Julia Gelfand

Julia Gelfand

Applied Sciences & Engineering Librarian, University of California, Irvine
Julia Gelfand has participated in many Charleston conferences for nearly 20 years.  She continues to have interests in many aspects of the library, publisher, vendor triad that shapes collection development decisions and is watching the tides shift with new and emerging technologies... Read More →
avatar for Roger C. Schonfeld

Roger C. Schonfeld

Director of Libraries, Scholarly Communications and Museums Program, Ithaka S+R
Roger is program director at Ithaka S+R. There, he leads strategic consulting, surveys, and other research projects, designed for academic libraries, publishers, and scholarly societies. Previously, Roger was a research associate at The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. He received degrees... Read More →
avatar for Tom Hickerson

Tom Hickerson

Principle Investigator, University of Calgary
Tom Hickerson formerly served as Vice Provost for Libraries and Cultural Resources and University Librarian at the University of Calgary, 2006-2018. He led the programmatic design of the Taylor Family Digital Library and a high-density storage facility, a $205 million capital project... Read More →
avatar for Barbara  Dewey

Barbara Dewey

Dean, University Libraries & Scholarly Communications, Penn State University
Barbara I. Dewey is Dean, University Libraries and Scholarly Communications at Penn State University. Previously she was Dean of Libraries, University of Tennessee, Knoxville. She has also held several administrative positions at the University of Iowa Libraries including as Interim... Read More →


Wednesday November 6, 2019 2:00pm - 3:10pm
Grand Ballroom 1, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

2:00pm

Print Collections as Battleground? Replacing Conflict with Conversations in the Use of Library Spaces
As libraries continue to adapt their spaces for a growing list of uses other than physical collections, it should not be assumed that the academic community served by these collections will continue to respond with, at best, little to no interest. There has been a continuous trend to shift and repurpose on-campus collections space to off-campus or electronic access, however, most focus has been on collections with adequate electronic surrogates, easily accessible content, or in STEM fields which are not as monograph dependent for research and teaching. Print books and journals across disciplines continue to be published and acquired by libraries, so as the offsite and electronic trend continues, it may cross into the territory of disciplines whose users have historically been mostly shielded from these changes as their remaining physical collections have been left largely untouched . . . until now. The trend in higher education to emphasize STEM fields and courses of study directly related to economic output and job creation leaves some departments and faculty feeling threatened. These trends are clashing to create an environment in which library collections and/or the spaces they occupy are the spoils at stake with public services and liaison librarians navigating the front lines with faculty. We need allies in order to navigate these crucial conversations and bring to light how non-library related issues in higher education are affecting day to day operational decisions and libraries’ long-term planning and programmatic uses of space. Five library administrators will share their stories along with how they have discussed these issues with the broader academic and publishing community. Participants will leave the session with a greater understanding of how the programmatic uses of the space currently occupied by print collections is a critical issue along with an understanding in how to broach these topics in their conversations with humanities faculty as creators and researchers.

Note: Georgie Donovan, Associate Dean, Collections and Content Services, William and Mary, also contributed to this session but was unable to attend and present in person.

Speakers
avatar for Sarah Tudesco

Sarah Tudesco

Program Director, Assessment & User Experience Research, Yale University Library
avatar for Brad Warren

Brad Warren

Associate Dean of Library Services, University of Cincinnati
I am responsible for the services, academic engagement and organizational development activities at the University of Cincinnati Libraries. Previous to my role at UC, I was the Director of Access Services at Yale University, Public Relations and Grants Librarian at UNC Charlotte... Read More →
avatar for Boaz Nadav-Manes

Boaz Nadav-Manes

University Librarian, Lehigh University
Boaz Nadav-Manes is Lehigh University Librarian. He develops services, programs and activities with campus and community partners that lead to the success of students, faculty, staff, and broader community members. In addition, Boaz provides leadership and overall direction to the... Read More →
MM

Michael Meth

Associate Dean, Research and Learning Services, Florida State University



Wednesday November 6, 2019 2:00pm - 3:10pm
Colonial Ballroom, Embassy Suites Hotel 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

2:00pm

Putting Your Library Learning Materials to Work: Making Not Just ‘talk of’, but ‘use of’ Your Many Things!
Since 2000, the cost of attending a U.S. public college has nearly doubled. In response, in June 2019, policymakers proposed canceling $1.6 trillion in outstanding student debt for 45 million students. The student cost of buying learning materials has often been cited as a significant and unwelcome contributor to rising student debt. How do librarians approach this conversation, and in what ways is the library already helping reduce student spend on learning resources? How can librarians help grow the use of materials among professors and students to take full advantage of their institution-wide purchases and subscriptions? With a panel of innovative Deans and Directors sharing, the audience will be part of a lively discussion on: • Obstacles faced by Collection Development in supporting awareness, access, and delivery of learning materials including, the cataloging of video, audio, podcasts, and open education resources for discovery by faculty and course designers; ensuring that those materials meet fair-use or copyright compliance • The best practices or strategic considerations for adopting Software as a Service such as Resource List Solutions, Learning Management System integrations, and the behavioral changes of the library staff and teaching faculty in creating resource lists for student consumption • How recent court cases surrounding fair-use/fair dealings could impact copyright compliance of learning materials used in higher education and ways to manage this positively An interactive discussion between panelists and participants, the group will work together to build a picture of the role librarians, publishers, and vendors play in the delivery of learning materials, and sharing ideas around the pedagogic value of much of the existing library catalogs to university programs. Attendees will leave with new ideas about the way their library might partner across the university to create a seamless, affordable, relevant experience with learning materials for the benefit of their students and faculty.

Speakers
avatar for Charles Lyons

Charles Lyons

Director, Butler Library, State University of New York College at Buffalo
Charles Lyons is Library Director at Buffalo State College. Previously he served as Associate University Librarian for Discovery & Delivery at the University at Buffalo, worked in the corporate library at Lehman Brothers, and in the Science and Engineering Libraries at the University... Read More →
avatar for Kiren Shoman

Kiren Shoman

VP of Editorial Pedagogy, SAGE Publishing
Kiren is responsible for SAGE London’s pedagogical publishing, covering textbooks, reference and video. Kiren is also responsible for Sage's recent acquisition, Talis, a technology company focused on connecting teaching and learning. She has played an instrumental role in the development... Read More →
avatar for Austina Jordan

Austina Jordan

Head of Access Services, University Of North Georgia
I graduated from Covenant College with History Degree. I begrudgingly went to graduate school at the prompting of my adviser where I studied Public History & Library Science at Kent State University. It was a fantastic decision. I've been working in libraries for ten years now. I... Read More →
avatar for Anaya Jones

Anaya Jones

eLearning Librarian, Southern New Hampshire University
I'm interested in scalable online information literacy instruction, accessibility, and increasing access/decreasing cost.


Wednesday November 6, 2019 2:00pm - 3:10pm
Laurens Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:00pm

Should you Pay for the Chicken When you can Get It for Free? No longer Life on the Farm as We Know It
The scholarly publishing ecosystem is having to adapt following changes in funding, scholarly review, and distribution. Taken alone, each changemaker could markedly influence the entire chain of research consumption. Combining these change forces together has the potential for a complete upheaval in the biome. A panel of stakeholders representing researchers, editors, librarians, publishers, digital security experts, and content mediators address such questions as what essential components constitute scholarly literature and who should shepherd them. Help shape the productivity and progress of the scientific community as a whole by joining this timely dialogue on the care, feeding, and safekeeping of peer-reviewed scholarly research.

Speakers
avatar for James King

James King

Branch Chief & Information Architect, NIH
James currently manages the subscription portfolio and assessment efforts for the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Library. He has spent over 25 years in US Federal libraries blending his IT background with librarianship to enhance and optimize library services to ensure value... Read More →
avatar for Beth Bernhardt

Beth Bernhardt

Consortia Account Manager, Oxford University Press/ Previously at UNC Greensboro
Beth works for Oxford University Press as a Consortia Account Manager. Before coming to OUP she was the Assistant Dean for Collection Management and Scholarly Communications at UNC Greensboro. Beth has served as the Principle Program Director for the Charleston Conference since... Read More →
avatar for Sari  Frances

Sari Frances

Dir. Content Protection Services, Elsevier
avatar for Sharon Mattern Büttiker

Sharon Mattern Büttiker

Content Management Director, Reprints Desk
With 20+ years of “life on the farm" experience, Sharon has created and fostered content dissemination networks, supported user-driven access principles and maintained metadata standards. Former publisher turned Content Management Director at Reprints Desk, she addresses the challenges... Read More →
avatar for Susie Winter

Susie Winter

Director of Communications and Engagement, Springer Nature
Susie Winter is Director of Communications and Engagement, Research at Springer Nature where she heads up external communications for Springer Nature in its position as a leading research publisher.Susie joined Springer Nature from the Publishers Association, the trade association... Read More →
CH

Crane Hassold

Sr. Director of Threat Research, Agari


Wednesday November 6, 2019 2:00pm - 3:10pm
Citadel Green Room South, Embassy Suites Hotel 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

2:00pm

Eat Me! Drink Me! Rightsizing Your Department Through Reorganization
In this session, the presenters will deliver a brief presentation on the College of Charleston’s reorganization of the Collection Development, Cataloging, and Digital Scholarship and Services departments into one new department, “Collection and Content Services.”  The presenters moved into leadership positions during a time of major staff turnover and used this opportunity to reimagine the workflows and job roles of those in the department. Like all academic libraries, ours must balance budgetary restraints and institutional priorities while navigating the changing landscape of library services.

A lively discussion will follow the presentation, and audience participation and sharing of experience will be encouraged as a broad array of perspectives will provide useful for those facing similar challenges. Participants in this discussion should come away with strategies for managing reorganizations and change in general within their own department.

Speakers
avatar for Angela Flenner

Angela Flenner

Acquisitions and Resource Management Coordinator, College of Charleston Libraries
avatar for Heather Gilbert

Heather Gilbert

Associate Dean of Collection and Content Services, College of Charleston Libraries
Heather Gilbert is the Associate Dean of Collection and Content Services for the College of Charleston Libraries. She serves as Associate Director for the Coastal Region of the South Carolina Digital Library. She holds an MFA from the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts and an MLIS... Read More →



Wednesday November 6, 2019 2:00pm - 3:10pm
Salon II, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:00pm

Negotiating with Vendors
The introduction of digital content created a new link in the information chain: the license. Almost every librarian responsible for arranging electronic access to information has had to review or negotiate not just prices but contractual terms, adding hours — sometimes frustrating hours at that — to the process of buying materials. But few have legal training, and most non-sales people haven’t spent a lot of time thinking about what underpins successful negotiations.

Negotiating with Vendors brings together librarians and vendors to help you prepare for these discussions. You’ll come away with a better understanding of what is involved in negotiating, why licenses matter, and how to use them to safeguard your rights and ensure that both party’s obligations are made clear. Some of the dizzying legalese will come into focus, and armed with fresh insights you’ll be able to approach license discussions with less anxiety and doubt.

Speakers
avatar for Buzzy Basch

Buzzy Basch

Retired, Basch Subscriptions
Buzzy Basch heads Basch Associates. He previously had a career as President of Basch Subscriptions, and Turner Subscriptions, and Vice President Ebsco, and F W Faxon. Buzzy is an active member of ALA,SLA ,Nasig and MLA. He has been an association Treasurer, award recipient, and member... Read More →
avatar for Marjorie Hlava

Marjorie Hlava

President, Access Innovations
I love to talk about organizing "things" for retrieval and storage with an eye to getting them back out of the repository. Knowledge management, cataloging, taxonomies, ontologies etc and the tools needed to create, manage, and apply them to content of any kind. I've been doing... Read More →


Wednesday November 6, 2019 2:00pm - 3:10pm
Carolina Ballroom B, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:00pm

To the Walrus or the Carpenter? Framing Budget Conversations Around Leadership Types
In Reframing Academic Leadership, Bolman and Gallos discuss four frames of leadership through which administrators tend to operate: human resources, politician, structural, or symbolic. Understanding the leadership style of the administrator with whom you are having budget conversations can have a significant impact on the success of the conversation. This session will discuss these four frames and provide attendees with tools to better understand not only their own leadership frame, but the frames of those with whom they work. After understanding the frames, participants will be given time to brainstorm ways to approach budget conversations with others based on each of the four leadership styles. After brainstorming, the group will come together to discuss the frames, how they approach those with the same or different frames, and expected outcomes for any conversation given the frames of the participants involved.

Speakers
avatar for Ashley Chase

Ashley Chase

Associate Director, Stetson University College of Law


Wednesday November 6, 2019 2:00pm - 3:10pm
Rutledge Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:00pm

“For some of us are out of breath:” a discussion for newly appointed leaders in collections and technical services
Have you been appointed head, assistant/associate director, supervisor, manager, or similar for the first time within the last two years? Feeling out of breath from juggling all of your new responsibilities? Or do you anticipate becoming a leader in the near future and want a glimpse behind the curtain? Join a lively discussion with librarians who have also recently stepped into collections and technical services leadership roles and are right there with you. Panelists will each touch on a different challenge and/or benefit of taking on a library leadership position and then invite attendees to enrich the subject by contributing their own perspectives and experiences. Attendees can expect to hear tips, tricks, and advice about topics such as training, mentorship, advocacy, communication, workload, staffing, emotional labor, and navigating campus politics. The lively discussion format will not only allow attendees to actively participate in and contribute their own ideas to the session, but will also help facilitate networking for participants who are having difficulty finding peer librarians with similar responsibilities now that they are in a new role. Bring your business cards and come prepared to share your struggles and triumphs with the room as we strive to make it a little less lonely and overwhelming at the top.

Speakers
avatar for Ann Roll

Ann Roll

Associate Dean of Collections and Schol Comm, California State University Fullerton
avatar for Erika L. Johnson

Erika L. Johnson

Associate Dean for Technical Services, University of San Francisco
As Associate Dean for Technical Services, my areas of responsibility include oversight of the Acquisitions, Cataloging, Digital Collections, Electronic Resources, Periodicals, and Systems departments. Before joining USF in 2014 as Head of Acquisitions & Collection Management, I was... Read More →
avatar for Jessie Copeland

Jessie Copeland

Assistant Director, Resource Management, Emory University
avatar for Sarah McClung

Sarah McClung

Head of Collection Development, University of California, San Francisco
Sarah McClung, MIS, is the head of collection development at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). She has worked in academic health sciences libraries for over a decade and, in her current role, she oversees the overall development and management of the UCSF Library’s... Read More →
TA

Thea Allen

Interim Director for Resource Management, Lane Medical Library, Stanford University



Wednesday November 6, 2019 2:00pm - 3:10pm
Ashley Room, Courtyard Marriott Hotel 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:00pm

A proposed framework for the evaluation of academic librarian scholarship
As scholar/practitioners, academic librarians face a wide range of expectations for scholarship in their job responsibilities, including for rank, tenure, and promotion. From podcasts and blogs to Against the Grain column authorship to conference presentations and research articles, the range of scholarship produced by academic librarians reflects the diversity of expectations and job responsibilities in the profession, and impact can be difficult to contextualize or even quantify. The very definition of scholarship varies widely across academic institutions, with some more inclusive of professional service and non-peer-review outlets than others. At the same time, the nature of scholarship itself is rapidly changing to include a stronger focus on concerns about open access, author’s rights, equitable production and ‘gate-keeping’ that is associated with many traditional and emerging forms of scholarly communication. This session will engage in a discussion about a proposed framework, created by the ACRL Impactful Scholarship and Metrics Task Force, that is designed to facilitate the work of academic institutions as they evaluate and update their guidelines for measuring the impact of academic librarian scholarship. The framework outlines a wide variety of scholarly outputs, and creates two primary categories of impact - scholarly and practitioner - with a variety of metrics, measures, and altmetrics for the evaluation of each category. The task force representatives will discuss their background research findings, introduce the proposed framework, and guide the participants in a conversation about the strengths, weaknesses, and next steps for this framework. We will also discuss other initiatives that will inform scholarship, including open access and equity issues, spearheaded by academic librarianship

Speakers
avatar for Rachel Borchardt

Rachel Borchardt

Associate Director, Research and Instructional Services, and Science Librarian, American University
Rachel Borchardt is the science librarian at American University. Her professional research focuses on the intersection of metrics and libraries, and she has written and presented on the topic in many venues, including a recent book publication titled Meaningful Metrics: A 21st-Century... Read More →
avatar for Jennifer Matthews

Jennifer Matthews

Collection Strategy Librarian, Rowan University
avatar for Polly Boruff-Jones

Polly Boruff-Jones

Dean of the Library, Indiana University Kokomo
Polly D. Boruff-Jones, MLS, MPA, is Dean of the Library at Indiana University Kokomo. Her professional and research interests are in the areas of information literacy, assessment in higher education, organizational leadership and personnel development. Throughout her academic library... Read More →
avatar for Sigrid Kelsey

Sigrid Kelsey

Director of Library Communications and Publications, Louisiana State University


Wednesday November 6, 2019 2:00pm - 3:10pm
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott Hotel 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:00pm

Driving Textbook Affordability: Bridging the Gap Between Faculty and Librarian in the Selection of Open Educational Resources (OER)
As college textbook and course material costs continue to rise, it’s clear that there is an increasing need for faculty and librarians to provide cost-effective resources to students, and today’s digital/electronic options have the potential to help meet that need. During this session, we will discuss the 2019 Library Journal Textbook Affordability study to better understand the current state of the textbook affordability issue from the perspective of academic librarians, keeping in mind the following questions:

• To what extent is textbook affordability seen as an issue that needs resolving?
• What are some of the strategies that institutions and libraries have adopted to help combat the problem of textbook affordability?
• To what extent do libraries and faculty cooperate and collaborate to resolve the issue?
• How do these libraries assess their success in making textbook content more affordable for students?
• Are there some disciplines and course types that lend themselves better to electronic alternatives than others?

To complement the academic librarian perspective, hear preliminary results from part two of this survey (final survey results to be released later in 2019), which surveyed a broad selection of higher education faculty with the aim of learning more about their experiences with textbook affordability and how this and related issues affect their students, course planning, and overall accessibility of materials. One specific problem that librarians and faculty face, is that while many Open Educational Resources (OER) exists, it can be difficult and time-consuming to find them and know whether they’re available for use in courses. In addition, there may be unrestricted, DRM-free e-books available through the library that faculty could use in their courses but might not know about. During this session, you will also hear how an academic library is currently using EBSCO Faculty Select to help increase access and affordability of educational resources and learn more about different tools and resources to help libraries provide cost-effective course materials to faculty and students.

Speakers
avatar for Michelle Rivera-Spann

Michelle Rivera-Spann

Director of Marketing - Library, Taylor and Francis Group
avatar for George Hart

George Hart

Director of Libraries, University of Massachusetts Lowel
avatar for Donna Shaw

Donna Shaw

Director of Product Management, EBSCO
At EBSCO, I am working on products and solutions that focus on textbook affordability for students, interoperability with Learning Management Systems, bridging the communication gap between librarians and faculty, and providing insight to librarians and faculty on usage of resources... Read More →
EL

Emilie Littlehales

Taylor & Francis



Wednesday November 6, 2019 2:00pm - 3:10pm
Salon I, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:00pm

From Tech Titans to Brave Open World: Future Scoping the Library
Tech Titans, Brave Open World, Eastern Ascendance – Are you ready to discuss three plausible future scenarios for the world of research and the implications for the library? Join us for a highly interactive discussion based on the Research Futures report.

This analysis of how research will be conducted and communicated 10 years from now is based on: an extensive literature review, 56 expert interviews, a survey of 2,055 researchers and 3 one-day workshops. The Elsevier and Ipsos MORI study identified 19 key drivers, such as AI and machine-learning tools change the shape of science, and public funders have less influence over research priorities. Within the report the drivers are grouped into 6 themes that led to the 3 future scenarios.

Research has reached a tipping point: how research is conceived, completed and communicated will change dramatically over the next 10 years. Journey with your colleagues into an exploration of the impact of these potential drivers of change, the repercussions of the decisions we make today and how we equip the workforce of tomorrow.

Within this session, a host will hand out a synopsis of the future scenarios to attendees and then engage them with an online poll. Librarians will lead discussions on the key questions within individual groups focused on preparing for and navigating the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead.
Take an exhilarating leap into the future of research and research libraries!

Speakers
avatar for Rick Anderson

Rick Anderson

Assoc. Dean for Collections & Schol Comm, University of Utah
avatar for Michael Levine-Clark

Michael Levine-Clark

Dean, University of Denver Libraries
CH

Carol Hoover

Digital Information Resources Manager, Los Alamos National Laboratory
Carol manages the digital scholarly information collection at Los Alamos National Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy multidisciplinary research institution engaged in strategic science on behalf of national security. She is responsible for digital collection strategy, content... Read More →
avatar for Diane Bruxvoort

Diane Bruxvoort

Dean of Libraries, University of North Texas
Diane is just another library dean trying to find the best way forward in the balancing of research support, budgets, and open access. She's been in leadership positions in four large academic libraries in the US and the UK so has experience with a variety of policies around this... Read More →
avatar for Ann Gabriel

Ann Gabriel

Senior Vice President, Elsevier
Ann Gabriel and her global team engage with key stakeholders across the research enterprise to establish strategic collaborations and to use analytics and data to address societal challenges in the area of sustainability, diversity and inclusion, and open science. She has held a... Read More →


Wednesday November 6, 2019 2:00pm - 3:10pm
Calhoun Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:00pm

Josh Nicholson & Scite - New Directions for Research Information
Josh Nicholson is a scientist and entrepreneur who has developed an innovative and collaborative open scholarly publishing platform (The Winnower) which was later acquired by Authorea. He is now the CEO of scite.ai - a unique way to assess research credibility, contribution and value, using artificial intelligence and a growing team of expert volunteers to verify ratings for each article on: whether the citing article supports, contradicts or merely mentions some previous research. Nicholson will share his insights as well as give attendees a brief overview and update on scite. It should be fascinating and informative session! Join us!

Speakers
NH

Nancy Herther

Sociology/Anthropology Librarian, University of Minnesota
avatar for Josh Nicholson

Josh Nicholson

CEO, Scite.ai
Josh Nicholson is co-founder and CEO of scite.ai, a deep learning platform that evaluates the reliability of scientific claims by citation analysis.Previously, he was founder and CEO of the Winnower (acquired 2016) and CEO of Authorea (acquired 2018 by Wiley), two companies aimed... Read More →



Wednesday November 6, 2019 2:00pm - 3:10pm
Drayton Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:00pm

The Scholarly Kitchen Live - Chat with the Chefs
Join us for an interactive discussion with several of the "Chefs" who write regularly for The Scholarly Kitchen (TSK), the blog of the Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP). This highly regarded and influential blog serves all segments involved in the scholarly publishing community. Founded in 2008, it is read by thousands of publishers, editors, librarians, researchers, and publishing service providers in more than 200 countries each day. TSK has more than 10,000 subscribers to daily content alerts and more than 20,000 followers on Twitter. In this Q&A session, the Chefs and audience members will discuss the most pressing issues facing those working in all areas of scholarly communications today. Bring your questions and expect a lively conversation!

Speakers
avatar for Lynnee Argabright

Lynnee Argabright

MSIS Graduate Student and Open Access Research Assistant, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
avatar for Todd Carpenter

Todd Carpenter

Executive Director, National Information Standards Organization (NISO)
avatar for Melanie Dolechek

Melanie Dolechek

Executive Director, SSP
Melanie Dolechek is the Executive Director of the Society for Scholarly Publishing. She has been active in scholarly publishing since 2006, previously serving as the Director of Publishing and Marketing of Allen Press. She plays an active role in the Coalition for Diversity and Inclusion... Read More →
JE

Joe Esposito

Senior Partner, Clarke & Esposito
avatar for Gwen Evans

Gwen Evans

Executive Director, OhioLINK
Executive Director of OhioLINK, a library consortium of 120 higher education libraries and the State Library of Ohio and a division of the Ohio Department of Higher Education. Formerly Associate Professor and the Coordinator of Library Information and Emerging Technologies at Bowling... Read More →
avatar for Jasmin Lange

Jasmin Lange

Chief Publishing Officer, Brill
avatar for Judy Luther

Judy Luther

President, Informed Strategies


Wednesday November 6, 2019 2:00pm - 3:10pm
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:00pm

Working Together to Create a Sustainable Ecology for Open Access Books
2019 has been a momentous year for Open Access book publishing as evidenced by the publication of several noteworthy reports and white papers—e.g. by the Universities UK Open Access Monographs Group, BISG, Digital Science, and Springer Nature. Taken together, these reports suggest that open access in scholarly book publishing is here to stay, but crucial challenges remain if we are to achieve a truly sustainable ecology for open access books. There is growing consensus that books have unique problems associated with (a) sustainable funding, (b) recognizing impact, (c) metadata, and (d) usage. But what do we do about it and how to best go about it? First we need some of the community in the room and then we can start to work on action points.

This session brings together speakers with a wide array of expertise in all aspects of book publishing as well as library workflows to facilitate a discussion of the larger issues at hand and start moving toward open dialogue and resolutions. One possible outcome of this discussion would be the formation of an "Open Monographs Action Group" that brings together diverse representation from across the scholarly publishing community. Likely discussion topics include:

a) scripting book ONIX into Crossref ONIX in a useable interface;
b) constructing terms-and-conditions and effective price point for open access books;
c) sustainability and evaluation;
d) Is a data trust possible and can it deliver what's needed to understand OA usage?
e) How can we better work with libraries to make these books discoverable and engage readers?

Speakers
avatar for Steve Fallon

Steve Fallon

Vice President of Americas and Strategic Partnerships, De Gruyter
avatar for Ruth Jones

Ruth Jones

Director of Global Sales, Digital Services, Ingram Content
avatar for Carolyn Morris

Carolyn Morris

EVP Higher Education, BiblioLabs
avatar for Brian O'Leary

Brian O'Leary

Executive Director, Book Industry Study Group
Brian O’Leary is executive director of the Book Industry Study Group, a U.S.-based trade association that disseminates information, creates and implements standards and conducts research to benefit the book publishing supply chain.Before being named to this role in 2016, O'Leary... Read More →
avatar for Amy Pawlowski

Amy Pawlowski

Deputy Director, OhioLINK, OhioLINK
avatar for Peter Potter

Peter Potter

Publishing Director & ARL Visiting Program Officer, TOME, University Libraries at Virginia Tech
I'm looking for good ideas on how to develop and enhance library publishing workflow



Wednesday November 6, 2019 2:00pm - 3:10pm
Cypress Ballroom South, Courtyard Marriott Hotel 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:00pm

Acting Up! Standards Improv and the Importance of Cross-Stakeholder Collaboration
Do your eyes glaze over when you hear about standards? Are standards something for other people to worry about? Are you up to your eyebrows in inconsistent data, proprietary formats, uncertain update timelines and processes, and other detours and dead-ends to essential library and content processes? If so, then you should become familiar with some helpful standards! There’s more to standards than bewildering technical documents, smiling PowerPoints, and cheerful update newsletters. Standards result from a collaborative effort by all stakeholders: libraries, content providers, and technology providers. They are created by real people to solve real problems in real situations. They define transactions, help with workflows, and create consistency across organizations, communities, and stakeholders. Come join Standards Improv to learn how standards affect the scholarly communications, acquisitions, and collection lifecycles. This interactive session will use a unique format. Audience members will role-play skits, using provided scripts (augmented with their own experience) to demonstrate the complexity around standards-making. Each highlighted standard will start with a brief introduction and a member of the standard’s working group will share lessons learned. Using examples from NISO, we will reveal the frictions that slow progress toward launching and updating standards, but also demonstrate how and why we still cooperate to overcome these obstacles. During this interactive session, you will learn how and why to get involved in making standards, as well as gain a more practical understanding for other key stakeholders’ viewpoints. Participants will gain insight into why we persevere through pain points of standards creation to improve exchange and support innovation and take away lessons for better standards engagement at your own institution.

Speakers
avatar for Christine Stohn

Christine Stohn

Director Product Management, Ex Libris, a ProQuest Company
Christine Stohn is director of product management for discovery and delivery at Ex Libris. Christine has over 25 years of experience in the library and information industry, having worked on the content and data side before joining Ex Libris in 2001. In her current role Christine... Read More →
avatar for Julie Zhu

Julie Zhu

Senior Manager, Discovery Partners, IEEE
Julie Zhu cultivates and manages effective working relationships with Discovery Service, Link Resolver, Proxy Service and Search Engine providers to maximize IEEE content findability, visibility and accessibility in multiple discovery channels. She serves in NISO’s Information Discovery... Read More →
avatar for Athena Hoeppner

Athena Hoeppner

Discovery Services Librarian, University of Central Florida Libraries
avatar for Heather Staines

Heather Staines

Director Business Development, MIT Knowledge Futures Group


Wednesday November 6, 2019 2:00pm - 3:10pm
Magnolia Room, Courtyard Marriott Hotel 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:00pm

The Value of Video: Accessibility, Streaming, and the 21st Century Library
Join Oregon State University's Resource Acquisition and Sharing Director, Kerri Goergen-Doll, and both Kanopy's Senior Marketing Analyst, Ryan Wilkins and Director of Customer Success, Chris Dappen, to reflect on the importance of streaming video in the academic market.  We'll discuss how libraries are managing the rising demand of video, accessibility and the future of film as a key academic resource.

Speakers
KG

Kerri Goergen-Doll

Director, Collections, Acquisitions & Resource Sharing, Oregon State University
Resource Acquisition and Sharing Director, OSU, Corvallis, OR
CD

Chris Dappen

Director of Customer Success, Kanopy
I've been working with libraries for over 10 years with experience in a variety of content types and disciplines. When not working, I enjoy spending time with my family in Denver.
RW

Ryan Wilkins

Senior Marketing Analyst, Kanopy


Wednesday November 6, 2019 2:00pm - 3:10pm
Gold Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

3:10pm

Refreshment Break
Wednesday November 6, 2019 3:10pm - 3:30pm
Outside Grand Ballroom, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

3:30pm

State of the Academic Library: Results from the 2019 Academic Libraries Survey
As library thought-leaders look ahead to the future of librarianship and consider the impact of changing institutional and patron needs and expectations as well as new technologies and processes, it is important to objectively measure and track over time, the core foundations of what makes an academic library function, its needs, challenges, and what next steps are most important to the library’s continued good health. This session will summarize the findings from the Academic Libraries Benchmark Survey, sponsored by Ex Libris, a ProQuest Company, in conjunction with Library Journal. The survey establishes benchmark data on respondents, addresses the library’s place within the university’s ecosystem, discusses major challenges to the library’s mission, and examines information on adjacent initiatives such as affordable learning or research data management. Join Dennis Swanson, Dean of University of North Carolina Pembroke and Ex Libris at Charleston Conference as we take a deep dive into the data, and take the temperature of the academic library as it stands today.

Speakers
OB

Oren Beit-Arie

Chief Strategy Officer, ProQuest
Oren Beit-Arie, Chief Strategy Officer, oversees the continuing development and promotion of ProQuest’s long-term enterprise strategy. Mr. Beit-Arie has vast experience in operations, product management and strategy. He is one of the primary developers of the ANSI/NISO Z39.88 (... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Dennis M Swanson

Dr. Dennis M Swanson

Dean, University of North Carolina Pembroke
I've been involved in academic librarianship as a director, vice-president, and dean for over 25 years, I've work in reshaping organizational and leadership structures, facilities design and remodeling, and have taught in several different countries. I've also led in library system... Read More →


Wednesday November 6, 2019 3:30pm - 4:10pm
Grand Ballroom 2, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

3:30pm

Begin at the beginning: Revamping collection development workflows
“Begin at the beginning,” the King said, very gravely, “and go on till you come to the end: then stop.” This presentation will describe how two librarians newer to the University of Tennessee Libraries refreshed collection development workflows at the Libraries after a reorganization. This reorganization broke up some tasks that had been traditionally handled by one person to be handled by several people. In this new matrix environment, more communication was required to achieve desired outcomes, but more buy-in was also needed from constituents such as the subject librarians. This presentation will describe how a new Collections Committee was formed to make decisions on high-dollar resources; what information was added to the traditional request form to facilitate the committee’s decisions; what information was asked of vendors at the point of trial or initial interest; and how this fed into a new collection development policy. By revamping the workflows to ask for more information up front, the presenters were able to help the new Collections Committee obtain all the information needed for decision-making at the point of decision. Attendees can expect to gain insight into how organizational changes can be used as an opportunity to instigate workflow changes that help libraries acquire resources more nimbly and flexibly.

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Mezick

Jennifer Mezick

Collection Strategist, University of TN
avatar for Elyssa Gould

Elyssa Gould

Head, Acquisitions & Continuing Resources, University of Tennessee, Knoxville



Wednesday November 6, 2019 3:30pm - 4:10pm
Carolina Ballroom A, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:30pm

Beyond Journals: Inside Society Archive Collections
Academic and learned societies are a critical part of the scholarly communications landscape, offering important knowledge, innovative research and advocacy for the disciplines they specialize in. Researchers all over the world rely on the published outputs of these societies as trusted leaders in their fields, and are often able to access these journals through their library’s subscription.

However, the published research of a society represents only a fraction of the story behind it. Within the society’s walls lies the raw materials accumulated over hundreds of years--including personal papers, manuscripts, photographs, maps, correspondence, meeting minutes, ephemera and more—that reflect the evolution and growth of the field itself. These largely unpublished archives are distinct from other types of primary source collections, in that they are deliberate and purpose-built, meant to preserve and serve as an ongoing repository for leaders, fellows and members in their fields.

The digitization of society archives is not only critical to providing wider access and discoverability of this original source material, but also to introducing new perspectives into the scholarly conversation as researchers re-interpret the findings of their predecessors.

In this session, Wiley will facilitate an interactive discussion that explores:
• The role of academic societies in the scholarly communications landscape, how their archives are formed and why they’re distinct from other archive collections
• Why and how academic societies are entering partnerships to digitize their archive collections
• The opportunities that access to society archives will present for research, teaching and learning
• The interdisciplinary nature of society archives and how they fit into the library’s collection development strategy
• Case studies from society leaders and researchers that offer real-life application
This session will include a diverse range of perspectives from across the globe, including well-known academic society leaders and researchers. The goal of the session is to provide a deeper understanding of academic societies and the value of their archive collections, how current digitization projects are enabling greater access and discovery of unpublished primary source materials, and opportunities for libraries to support researchers in their quest for more innovative lines of inquiry.

Speakers
AM

Alasdair MacLeod

Head of Enterprise and Resources, Royal Geographical Society
avatar for Sarah Pickman

Sarah Pickman

Ph.D. Candidate, History of Science and Medicine, Yale University
avatar for Felix Lancashire

Felix Lancashire

Assistant Archivist, Royal College of Physicians



Wednesday November 6, 2019 3:30pm - 4:10pm
Ashley Room, Courtyard Marriott Hotel 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:30pm

Piloting the surge: Streaming Video and Academic Libraries
Demand for streaming video seems to increase by leaps and bounds every year. This demand has led many libraries into an ever-tightening cycle of allocating limited funding to it. Libraries of all sizes approach meeting the demand in varying ways, utilizing acquisition models from perpetual access to demand driven acquisitions and more. Chicago State University’s Gwendolyn Brooks Library decision to trial and acquire Kanopy was completely a patron-demand-driven undertaking.  It was spearhead wholly by faculty interest in the resource and ranged from the inquiry for a trial to implementing its PDA model. 
CSU librarians plan to discuss the acquisition process, steps for making the trial and then the resource available to the CSU community, promotion of the resource, and reassessment and analysis of the initial acquisition and subsequent reinvestment of more funds in the resource.  In the latter case, initial allotted funds were quickly depleted, so additional funds were allocated to this resource.  We will end by presenting lessons learned.
In 2016, the Ohio State University Libraries had an opportunity to meet user demand by starting long term pilots with three different streaming platforms – Kanopy, DocuSeek2 and Swank Digital Campus. With long term pilots, the OSU Libraries had the luxury of time to evaluate each platform for usefulness of content, manageability of the acquisition model and to develop workflows for managing streaming film acquisition generally.
This presentation will describe the pilots, how they performed over the three pilot years and any changes made. It will finish by discussing how the pilots were evaluated as they ended and impacts on how streaming video acquisitions will be managed at the OSU Libraries in the future.

Speakers
avatar for Anita Foster

Anita Foster

Electronic Resources Officer, The Ohio State University
avatar for Azungwe Kwembe

Azungwe Kwembe

Coordinator of Acquisitions, Chicago State Univ
avatar for Joanna Kolendo

Joanna Kolendo

Electronic Resources, Instruction, & Reference Librarian, Chicago State University
avatar for Charlene Snelling

Charlene Snelling

Reference & Instruction Librarian and Head of Reference, Chicago State University


Wednesday November 6, 2019 3:30pm - 4:10pm
Carolina Ballroom B, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:30pm

Revitalizing Library Collections: A Tale of Two Libraries
We librarians agree that weeding is one of the vital components of collection development for all libraries regardless of their type or size. Yet due to the nature of a weeding project, which is usually massive in scale, complex in planning, and daunting in working load, not many of us are keen to talk about it, not to mention undertake. This presentation will share two different library weeding experiences. 
The consolidation of Kennesaw State University and Southern Polytechnic State University resulted in the merging of the two library collections for a total of 40,000 monographs. Considering that neither library had weeded their collection for decades, the integrated collection was in dire need of evaluation and weeding. With careful planning, we initiated the massive weeding project in 2017. In this presentation, I will share our valuable firsthand experiences in managing various aspects of the project, such as creating feasible project plans and documents, building effective teams, and developing a seamless workflow. I hope our successful experiences will inspire like undertakings at other institutions. 
 To make room for a planned student center in the Library, the University of California, Irvine Libraries needed to identify 130,000 items to move off-site or de-accession during a short time frame. The presentation will cover different stages of the project: use of GreenGlass to help us understand our holdings, subject librarian selection of titles, and creation of a webpage and database for campus review. Faculty responses, the good and the negative, will also be covered.  Additionally, I will provide you with tips and lessons learned in project management that can help others responsible for putting such a plan into action.

Speakers
avatar for Becky Imamoto

Becky Imamoto

Head of Collection Strategies, University of California, Irvine
avatar for Xueying Chen

Xueying Chen

STEM Collection Development Librarian and Monographs Coordinator, Kennesaw State University



Wednesday November 6, 2019 3:30pm - 4:10pm
Magnolia Room, Courtyard Marriott Hotel 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:30pm

Tip of the Iceberg: Choosing What Shows, Discovering What’s Hidden
Remote storage for large collections is becoming common, making those books inaccessible for physical browsing by researchers. The main libraries at Temple University and the University of Central Florida (UCF) each have approximately 1.3 million print items on-site. Both libraries are storing 90% of their collections in automated retrieval systems with 10% remaining available for browsing in open stacks. Deciding what to designate for the open stacks requires some assumptions about patron behavior, not only what materials users need to browse but also how users prefer to access books. In the first part of this session, Temple’s Collection Analysis Librarian will highlight both the decision-making and communication involved in creating Temple’s browsing title lists and the technologies used to create and store the lists. The presentation will note complications of the process, some of which were inevitable and others for which hindsight could offer solutions. It will also note what went well, and where success cannot yet be measured. The second part of the session will explore UCF’s efforts to improve discoverability of the items in storage. The visual aspects of a book (height, multi-volume, etc.) that often provide useful clues regarding the content disappear when the patron can only view a list of search results on a computer screen. How can the loss of these visual clues be mitigated? This session will examine online browsing guides, explore how researchers can modify their search strategies, and discuss features which might be built into online catalog systems and ebook platforms to enhance discoverability.

Speakers
avatar for Karen Kohn

Karen Kohn

Collections Analysis Librarian, Temple University
RG

Rich Gause

Government Information Librarian, University of Central Florida



Wednesday November 6, 2019 3:30pm - 4:10pm
Drayton Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:30pm

Area Studies, Time to Talk about the Threats, Trends and Current State of Collection Management and Publishing in the Digital Age of Globalization
César Braga-Pinto, Professor of Brazilian, Lusophone African and Comparative Literature at Northwestern University, made a Case for Area Studies in YaleGlobal Online in March 2019 by stating, "Globalization may prompt some to question the need for specific and diverse language, literature and regional studies programs in higher education. . . . To remain relevant, scholars in the humanities must pursue all avenues of interdisciplinarity, although the scope and viability of such studies vary among institutions. Likewise, the nature and scope of research and teaching, or the discipline and departments, do not always coincide. This session will investigate, analyze and report on the recent threats, trends and current state of Latin American and European Studies collection management and academic publishing to determine how libraries and publishers are managing the cause to remain relevant.

Speakers
AC

Angela Carreño

Head of Collection Development, New York University Libraries
Angela M. Carreño is the Head of Collection Development for the Division of Libraries at New York University. Angela has led, coordinated and supported the expansive growth of licensed electronic resources at NYU since 2000. She is the primary licensing officer for the Division of... Read More →
avatar for Steve Fallon

Steve Fallon

Vice President of Americas and Strategic Partnerships, De Gruyter
avatar for Brian Vetruba

Brian Vetruba

European Studies and Digital Scholarship Librarian, University of Minnesota--Twin Cities
Just began at UofMN in February. Previously at Washington Univ. in St. Louis as subject librarian for German, Comparative Literature and European Studies. I've had some experience in DH/Digital Scholarship but am still learning (Then again, aren't we all?). Mostly interested in tools... Read More →
AG

Adan Griego

Curator for Latin American, Iberian & Mexican American Collections, Stanford University


Wednesday November 6, 2019 3:30pm - 4:10pm
Rutledge Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:30pm

Building a Community-owned Resource Sharing Platform
Announced in 2018 by a group of consortial leaders, software developers, open source advocates, and resource sharing experts; Project ReShare is a community-driven effort to inject new life into the library resource sharing space. The goal: produce an interoperable, open source, scalable resource sharing platform. This user-friendly system will create: a shared index to communicate information about lendable materials within and across resource sharing groups, and A fulfillment system designed to modernize legacy ILL practices. How is ReShare different? Project ReShare is designed by and for its community of users, enabling the user to be in the center of every interaction. The result: a system that will allow libraries choice and opportunities to effectively share collections, empower decision making, and increase patron access to information. Attendees will learn how Project ReShare challenges long-held assumptions about traditional working relationships and business models between librarians and vendors. The presenters will describe a new model for collaboration where library stakeholders have influence over the tools they utilize every day. ReShare’s library-led product management process and the volunteer development effort by commercial companies create an exciting and strategic collaboration. The presenters believe this model is highly replicable and should be adopted in other settings. This session will provide attendees with an overview of the project and its current state of development and will discuss libraries’ role in advocacy for the use of standards and system interoperability. Finally, while ReShare’s near-term focus is resource sharing, the larger vision is to grow our platform and our conversation to encompass deeper integration and collaboration across collections, including shared analytics and collection management. We hope to inspire and encourage others to embrace this type of dynamic synergy. Just as the Dodo states “ The Best Way to Explain It is to Do It…”

Speakers
avatar for Anne McKee

Anne McKee

Program Officer for Resource Sharing, Greater Western Library Alliance (GWLA)
McKee received her M.L.S. from Indiana University, Bloomington with a very diverse career in librarianship. She has been an academic librarian, a sales rep for two subscription agencies and now a consortium officer for the past 19+ years. A former President of NASIG, McKee is a member... Read More →
avatar for Sebastian Hammer

Sebastian Hammer

Co-Founder and President, Index Data
Co-founder of Index Data. Passionate about interoperable systems and collaborative software projects. I have worked with library technology for the better part of three decades.
avatar for Nora Dethloff

Nora Dethloff

Head of Research Materials Procurement, University of Houston Libraries
Nora Dethloff is the Head of Research Materials Procurement at the University of Houston's M.D. Anderson Library, where she oversees ILL, Acquisitions, and Electronic Resources. Her research interests include OA, OER, and copyright in libraries. She has presented at state, regional... Read More →


Wednesday November 6, 2019 3:30pm - 4:10pm
Citadel Green Room South, Embassy Suites Hotel 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

3:30pm

Understanding and Improving Accessibility in your Library
Sponsored by Taylor & Francis.

Join T&F for an open conversation aimed at understanding and improving on various accessibility issues in your library. We’ll discuss accessibility issues and trends including access to content, content enhancements, accessibility guidelines and best practices, ancillary content upgrades and more.

Speakers
avatar for Alexandra Jacobs

Alexandra Jacobs

Senior Marketing Manager, Taylor & Francis
avatar for Michelle Rivera-Spann

Michelle Rivera-Spann

Director of Marketing - Library, Taylor and Francis Group


Wednesday November 6, 2019 3:30pm - 4:10pm
Colonial Ballroom, Embassy Suites Hotel 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

3:30pm

Better Together: How the MIT Libraries and MIT Press are Joining Forces to Increase Openness to Scholarship
The MIT Press has reported into the MIT Libraries for decades, but collaboration between the two was rare and usually one-off. This changed in 2015, when both the Libraries and Press hired directors who explicitly wanted to experiment with open access models and work with each other. This leadership and cultural shift has laid the groundwork for collaborations small and large between staff at the Press and Libraries, from joining each other’s teams to supporting open access journal flips to strategizing about the future of OA and scholarly publishing at MIT and beyond. In this session, Nick Lindsay from the MIT Press and Katharine Dunn from the MIT Libraries share details of how the Press/Libraries collaboration has evolved over the last several years and what future plans are; and they suggest ideas for how other libraries and university presses can join forces and support each other in the ever-changing publishing landscape.

Speakers
NL

Nick Lindsay

Director of Journals and Open Access, MIT Press
avatar for Katharine Dunn

Katharine Dunn

Scholarly Communications Librarian, MIT Libraries


Wednesday November 6, 2019 3:30pm - 4:10pm
Grand Ballroom 3, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

3:30pm

Bringing Some Stranger Things of Streaming Video up From the Upside Down World: Research Insights from Faculty and Students
The shift to streaming video as a medium for teaching and learning has transformed course delivery and the means by which videos are selected and integrated into course systems. This change has presented new challenges around copyright, technical and accessibility issues, and effective lines of communication between faculty and librarians, including new challenges and benefits to students who are increasingly scrutinizing the value of their own course experiences. How much do librarians know about effective instructor practice with streaming video? What do they understand about students’ engagement and interaction with these resources? This session will bring these major stakeholders together: the librarian, the faculty member, and the student to talk over results from recent qualitative research conducted at the UNC Greensboro (UNCG). It will give librarians a full picture of constituent expectations in streaming video resources as they face the growing demands for video as a teaching and learning resource. Christine Fischer, Head of Technical Services at UNCG and Michael Carmichael, Head of Visual Media at SAGE Publishing, will be present in the room to lead a lively discussion with the audience including important and valuable contributions via video conference from Dr. Dina Samora, Program Chair at Colorado State University Global Campus, and Elizabeth Ellis, a Master's student in Library and Information Studies from UNCG to:  • Share findings of instructor and student focus groups on specific user interactions and experiences with video. • Provide librarians with a full view of streaming video within the library: o Faculty: How they meet the needs of digital-native students with streaming video in their courses, the importance of incorporating this resource, and observed impacts as a result o Students: Why they like streaming video resources, feedback on how instructors have accommodated this preference, and its impact on their academic success. • Incorporate audience feedback, experiences, and a candid assessment of streaming video as an educational resource by cultivating a rich exchange of practices and insights.

Speakers
avatar for Christine Fischer

Christine Fischer

Head of Technical Services and Associate Professor, UNC Greensboro
Christine Fischer is the Head of Technical Services at UNC Greensboro, where she has worked since 2005. She has an interest in streaming film, acquisition models, and organizational culture. She has held positions in academic and special libraries in both public and technical ser... Read More →
avatar for Michael Carmichael

Michael Carmichael

Head of Visual Media, SAGE Publishing
Michael Carmichael is the Head of Visual Media at SAGE Publishing. He has over 20 years of commissioning and editorial experience developing print and digital products for the higher education and academic market. Michael joined SAGE in 1998 where he first spent many years developing... Read More →
avatar for Dina Samora

Dina Samora

Program Chair, Organizational Leadership, Colorado State University Global
Dina Samora has served students in higher education through the office of the dean, program and curricular development, and as a research professor for over 12 years. Dina is dedicated to improving the online learning experience for adult students. Dina's research interests include... Read More →
avatar for Elizabeth Ellis

Elizabeth Ellis

MLIS Student, LIS Instructor, UNC Greensboro
Elizabeth Ellis is currently a graduate student, LIS instructor, and intern for the Reference, Outreach, and Instruction department at UNC Greensboro. Before returning to graduate school full time, Elizabeth was a middle school Language Arts and Social Studies teacher. Her interests... Read More →


Wednesday November 6, 2019 3:30pm - 4:10pm
Salon II, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:30pm

Capitulating or Capitalizing, Compromising or Combatting: What is Meaningful Discourse Between Library and Vendor?
Increasingly reductive and adversarial framing of academic vendor/library interactions can provide a tempting lens through which to view the scholarly communication landscape, where vendors are unrepentant villains that act in bad faith and librarians are tragic heroes fighting (and often losing) for patron rights. However, upon further examination, the truth is far muddier and brings us to a reckoning.

Do we prefer the ease of a simple narrative to a truthful examination of the complicated and interconnected circumstances of libraries and publishers? It seems clear the answer is yes, but that preference and the simplification it provides dampens discourse rather than serving patrons. Further- in an era of excessive costs, return-on-investment obsession, and the corporatization of higher education can academic libraries be framed as “good” or so different from vendors? With the publishing marketplace an inequitable quagmire of multinational corporations and floundering small presses, can we call all publishers as “evil”?

We contend that this narrative is naive at best, willfully ignorant at worst, and unproductive regardless. This panel will grapple with the maddening nuance, unsatisfying ambiguity, and ultimately shared fate of libraries in higher education and their resource suppliers. This panel of acquisitions and collections librarians and vendor representatives will seek to engage in a productive conversation that acknowledges our current and unsustainable present and posits paths forward beyond Twitter.

Speakers
avatar for Ashley Chase

Ashley Chase

Associate Director, Stetson University College of Law
avatar for Cris Ferguson

Cris Ferguson

Assistant Dean of Libraries / Associate Professor, Murray State University
avatar for Kristen Twardowski

Kristen Twardowski

Library Sales Manager, U.S. and Canada, Duke University Press
Kristen Twardowski oversees Duke University Press\'s relationships with libraries and consortia in the US and Canada. She is eager to talk about ebooks, open access, and equity and inclusion.In light of the spread of COVID-19 and in solidarity with those affected, Duke University... Read More →
avatar for Lindsay Cronk

Lindsay Cronk

Head of Collection Strategies, University of Rochester
Lindsay Cronk is covered in tattoos and full of strong opinions.
avatar for Rachel Fleming

Rachel Fleming

Scholarly Communications Librarian, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
EL

Erin Luckett

Vice President, Sales, Readex


Wednesday November 6, 2019 3:30pm - 4:10pm
Gold Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

3:30pm

Challenges in Information Literacy: Leading Them to Water, Imploring Them to Drink -- hosting a successful faculty/graduate-student workshop.
University libraries devote significant resources toward education & training and overall information literacy initiatives aimed at benefiting their user communities. This great reservoir of information, tools, and outreach is there for consumption, though ensuring it will be consumed is a massive challenge with no guarantee of success despite the effort. Direct engagement with users, in this case faculty and graduate students, can greatly enhance their information literacy foundation and directly benefit their academic pursuits. Live educational workshops with lecture-like environments can be very successful in educating users on key benefits of particular information resources at their disposal. Holding successful workshops typically requires careful planning and organization, with a wide range of factors to consider – and the definition of success itself does of course vary from workshop scenario to scenario.
Here, our two librarians will each provide detail on their approach to ultimately achieving successful faculty and graduate student workshops within an information literacy framework. From the initial thought process to logistics of syncing topics, physical space, and people, gain insight into approaches resulting in successful library-driven user workshops.

Speakers
avatar for Susan Wald Berkman

Susan Wald Berkman

Asst. Dir Collection Development & Tech Services, Nova Southeastern University
Susan is the Assistant Director of Collection Development & Technical Services at the Alvin Sherman Library, Research and Information Technology Center at Nova Southeastern University. She started out as the Subject Specialist for Business at NSU and has her own information services... Read More →
avatar for Jeff Dougherty

Jeff Dougherty

Solutions Specialist, Web of Science Group -- Clarivate Analytics
Jeff has an extensive background within the scholarly and academic information industry – 27+ years with Web of Science Group (Clarivate Analytics) and its predecessor organizations dating back to the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI). During this time he’s held positions... Read More →
avatar for Linda Kopecky

Linda Kopecky

Head, Research Services – UWM Libraries, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee
Linda is the Head of Research Services at the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, a public urban R1 research university. Linda leads initiatives to support UWM’s overall research environment through advanced library services, collections and facilities. Previously Linda was Associate... Read More →


Wednesday November 6, 2019 3:30pm - 4:10pm
Laurens Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:30pm

Falling Down the Rabbit Hole: Exploring the Unique Partnership between Subject Librarians and Scholarly Communication
Subject librarians are uniquely poised to facilitate conversations and assistance about scholarly communication topics to faculty and students -- helping make the connections between scholarly communication and discipline-specific research. The University of Central Florida (UCF) Libraries offers a unique intersection between scholarly communication and subject librarians by implementing a robust subject librarian model that includes activities related to scholarly communication and partnering with UCF’s Office of Scholarly Communication to provide support on a variety of topics to the campus community. In particular, this model has been particularly effective with STEM disciplines. The subject librarians in these respective disciplines have actively partnered with the Office of Scholarly Communication to provide a series of workshops targeted to STEM faculty on topics such as predatory publishing. These conversations have prompted invitations to speak at college and department meetings and to provide additional assistance and support on these scholarly communication topics. It has also led to a research project conducted by the science, engineering and computer science librarians and the scholarly communication librarian on the open access publishing practices and trends of UCF STEM faculty to help better inform conversations and research support to these faculty. This session will explore the various ways in which this unique model aids UCF Libraries in providing scholarly communication support to faculty and students in an effective way and will share specific strategies and examples that attendees can practically implement at their respective institutions.

Speakers
avatar for Sarah Norris

Sarah Norris

Scholarly Communication Librarian, University of Central Florida
Sarah Norris is Scholarly Communication Librarian at the University of Central Florida Libraries. In this role, she leads the Libraries’ Scholarly Communication and open access efforts, with an emphasis on scholarly publishing and copyright. She has presented at local, state, national... Read More →
avatar for Sandy Avila

Sandy Avila

Science Librarian, University of Central Florida
Sandy is the Science Librarian in the Research and Information Services Department at the University of Central Florida Libraries. She is the subject librarian for Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics, Statistics, CREOL, and the NanoScience Technology Center. Her research interests... Read More →
avatar for Buenaventura (Ven)  Basco

Buenaventura (Ven) Basco

Engineering and Computer Science Librarian, University of Central Florida
Buenaventura (Ven) Basco is the subject librarian for the College of Engineering and Computer Science at the University of Central Florida. Ven has several interests in many aspects of librarianship – STEM instruction, collaboration and outreach, international relations programs... Read More →



Wednesday November 6, 2019 3:30pm - 4:10pm
Cypress Ballroom North, Courtyard Marriott Hotel 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:30pm

Open Infrastructure: The Way Forward for Open Access Monographs
The drive towards open access (OA) publishing is gathering pace, with international movements such as PlanS and US-based initiatives such as Open Access 2020 signalling the determination of policymakers and institutions to embrace open research. The challenges journals face in adapting to this new environment are well known, but monograph publishing has been comparatively neglected and, with BPCs typically starting at around $12,000, the question of how to enable OA for books is a pressing one for libraries, researchers, publishers and funders alike. Open infrastructure is increasingly being seen as a solution to this conundrum. Organisations such as SPARC and movements such as InvestInOpen, together with funding bodies, OA publishers, researchers and libraries are building the urgently-needed systems to ensure the creation, discoverability and long-term sustainability of open content. This panel includes publishers, researchers, and leaders in the development of open scholarly communications to discuss the recent acceleration in the drive towards open infrastructure, and how libraries and scholarly communication professionals can be part of the conversation. Each panellist is a Director of a non-profit OA company working collaboratively with other similarly-minded entities to create open infrastructures to support OA book publishing. They include Eelco Ferwerda (Director at OAPEN - board member DOAB, collaborating with OPERAS, COPIM), Rupert Gatti (Director & Co-founder of Open Book Publishers - collaborating with ScholarLed, COPIM, OPERAS, Coko Foundation/Editoria), Eileen Joy (Director & Co-founder of punctum books - collaborating with ScholarLed, COPIM, Coko Foundation/Editoria, OAPEN) and Pierre Mounier (Deputy Director at OpenEdition - coordinator of OPERAS, board member of DOAB) to discuss the challenges and opportunities for open infrastructure development and its significance for scholarly communication. Based in Holland, UK, USA and France, they will bring their diverse perspectives to a lively and wide-ranging discussion about the future of OA book publishing.

Speakers
avatar for Eelco Ferwerda

Eelco Ferwerda

Director, OAPEN
Eelco Ferwerda is director of the OAPEN Foundation. Before that he managed OAPEN as EU-funded project at Amsterdam University Press. He joined Amsterdam University Press in 2002 as Publisher of Digital Products. Before joining AUP, he worked in various new media subsidiaries at the... Read More →
avatar for Rupert Gatti

Rupert Gatti

Director, Open Book Publishers
Rupert Gatti is a Fellow and Director of Studies in Economics at Trinity College, Cambridge University. He is a co-founder and Director of the award winning Open Access book publishers, Open Book Publishers (www.openbookpublishers.com).  Founded as a non-profit by scholars at Cambridge in 2008, Open Book Publishers has now published over 80 high quality, rigorously peer reviewed scholarly monographs - including works by well know authors such as Amartya Sen and Noam Chomsky - and attracted over 1 million readers world... Read More →
PM

Pierre Mounier

Deputy Director, Open Edition
avatar for Eileen  Joy

Eileen Joy

Director / CEO, punctum books
I am a specialist in Old English literary studies and cultural studies, as well as a para-academic rogue publisher, with interests in poetry and poetics, intellectual history, ethics, affects, embodiments, queer studies, object/thing studies, the ecological, post/humanisms, and scholarly... Read More →


Wednesday November 6, 2019 3:30pm - 4:10pm
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott Hotel 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:30pm

Professional Learning and 'Inbetween Publishing': The Tasks of the Charleston Briefings
According to Kathleen Fitzpatrick, an authoritative observer of scholarly communications, “we have not yet begun to consider whether the book and the journal article should remain the primary forms that scholarly production takes in the digital age.” Their constraints give structure to scholarly inquiry but they also present unnecessary limits: “There has long been nothing in the large space between the journal article and the book.” This presentation features uses of this “inbetween” space for the treatment of ideas and practices at an appropriate length. It begins with an account of the founding of the Charleston Briefings, a series of short books representing an experiment in “inbetweenness” in publishing. A review of the rationale for the Briefings, paired with an examination of the guidelines for authors, will demonstrate editorial expectations, particularly for the properties of scholarly writing—in organization, explication, voice, and citation--well suited for the professional learning that is the goal of the series. The second part of the session will offer an account of the latest Charleston Briefing: The Scholarly Workflow in the Digital Age (due to appear in late 2019). Its author will explain its genesis, planning, and composition. While the length of the Briefings (as the series name suggests) may appear to be its defining element, how it manages its scholarly and educational tasks is the key to meeting its goals and the needs of readers. In this case, the author of the new Briefing will explain how “inbetweenness” can be an advantage for representing the subject’s timeliness and utility while managing the rapidly growing literature on its different dimensions, particularly what the evolution of the scholarly workflow means for library services. Participants will be invited to contribute to a discussion of the format’s utility in the context of opportunities for professional learning.

Speakers
SW

Steve Weiland

Professor of Higher Education, Michigan State University
avatar for Matthew Ismail

Matthew Ismail

Director of Collection Development, Central Michigan University Libraries


Wednesday November 6, 2019 3:30pm - 4:10pm
Salon I, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:30pm

Reconciling Civil Rights And Copyrights
For years, college and university Disability Services Offices (DSOs) and others involved in fulfilling the requirements of disability rights laws have viewed copyright (the body of law that governs copying, adaptation, distribution) as an impediment to their work. They have been uncertain about what is permitted and have constrained their activities in support of civil rights out of fear of violating copyrights. The tension has dramatically curtailed their efficiency, and it is due primarily to a misunderstanding of the voluntary nature of the arrangements DSOs have with some of the biggest publishers. These arrangements place strict constraints on DSOs’ use and reuse of accessible texts, based on the publishers’ view of their commercial interests, not on the law. Some publishers have also included misleading warnings on accessible texts they provide to DSOs. In reality, even in the absence of such voluntary arrangements, copyright law provides institutions of higher education with broad authority to create accessible copies of in-copyright works, to distribute accessible texts to qualified users, and to retain and share remediated texts in secure repositories for use in serving future qualifying requests. The speakers on this panel recently produced an in-depth review of the legal issues raised by sharing copyrighted work in the context of serving those with print disabilities. This report is part of a multi-university effort to build national infrastructure for sharing remediated print, including in-copyright materials, in order to reduce duplication of effort and help colleges and universities provide better service to students, faculty, and staff who need accessible texts. Libraries, DSOs, and University Presses are working together in this effort, and three large repositories are also participating: Bookshare, the Internet Archive, and HathiTrust. The work is being funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and led by the University of Virginia.

Speakers
JB

Jack Bernard

Associate General Counsel, University of Michigan
avatar for Brandon Butler

Brandon Butler

Director, Information Policy, University of Virginia Libraries
Brandon is the first Director of Information Policy at the UVA Library. He provides guidance and education to the Library and its user community on intellectual property and related issues, and advocates on the Library's behalf. He received his J.D. from the UVA School of Law in... Read More →



Wednesday November 6, 2019 3:30pm - 4:10pm
Cypress Ballroom South, Courtyard Marriott Hotel 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:30pm

"Virtual Reality, Augmented Reality, Mixed Reality, Extended Reality - what you need to know and why you need to know it! – Part 2!”
In 2018 we presented practical examples of 3D/VR in the academy. One year later and momentum has grown. Our update will cover the likely impact of the OpenXR standard, the recent IMLS symposium series, recently released hardware, and new applications in public and academic libraries as well as departmental initiatives. As before we’ll provide a basic grounding in 3D/VR and related areas, showing what it is and why it's important to libraries.

Speakers
avatar for Carl Grant

Carl Grant

Interim Dean of Libraries, Oklahoma University
Dean (Interim) of The University of Oklahoma Libraries, a facility that has been undergoing a rapid transformation for the last five years. Here is a link to our latest annual report that shows the scope of work being done here: https://issuu.com/oulibraries/docs/ou_libraries_pro... Read More →
avatar for Stephen Rhind-Tutt

Stephen Rhind-Tutt

President, Coherent Digital, LLC


Wednesday November 6, 2019 3:30pm - 4:10pm
Citadel Green Room North, Embassy Suites Hotel 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

3:30pm

The Sun Shining in the Middle of the Night: How Moving Beyond IP Authentication Does Not Spoil the Fun, Ease, or Privacy of Accessing Library Resources
Standardization of resource access is of keen interest to many libraries and librarians, especially in light of the new RA21: Resource Access for the 21st Century initiative. With a more standardized approach to resource management, there are persistent concerns including concerns for patron privacy, how the library can benefit from new access management systems, and the nitty-gritty of exactly what implementation looks like. In this session, we will hear from Michelle Colquitt of the Gwinnett Technical College Library, a Technical College System of Georgia Library that participates in the GALILEO consortium, regarding their pilot site implementation of OpenAthens authentication. This discussion will focus on the adoption of OpenAthens as an access management system: to include onboarding, workflow considerations (changes to teaching/chat reference services, content management—in Alma/Primo, SpringShare’s LibGuides, Blackboard LMS, and reporting), and the state of OpenAthens almost a year later. OpenAthens administrator-level functions will also be discussed. This discussion also will cover work with the college’s internal IT department, consortia-level support, and experiences with OpenAthens’ and EBSCO support teams. Andrew Nagy, director of software as a service innovation at EBSCO Information Services, will provide context about how better to understand the changing landscape of authentication, especially in terms of how SAML technology will replace IP authentication. Bring your questions, comments, and concerns for Michelle and Andrew as they help assuage your fears about managing your electronic resources with an access management system.

Speakers
avatar for Andrew Nagy

Andrew Nagy

Director of Software Innovation, EBSCO
The library community is undergoing a disruption in how we use technology. It's new, it's open source, and it's community driven to support a community of innovation. Talk to me about FOLIO - the open source library services platform!
avatar for Michelle Colquitt

Michelle Colquitt

Resource Management Librarian, Georgia Gwinnett College
Michelle Colquitt is the Resource Management Librarian at Georgia Gwinnett College in Lawrenceville, GA. Michelle is a career-changing new library professional who is interested in leadership roles within the academic library community in addition to Electronic Resource Management... Read More →



Wednesday November 6, 2019 3:30pm - 4:10pm
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:30pm

The Big Deal Is Dead! Long Live The Big Deal!
In many countries, the proclamation “The King is dead, long live the King” heralds the demise of the old monarch and the accession of a new one. It was likewise intended to ensure that the throne never remain empty while facilitating a smooth transition of power. When the “big deal” journal subscription model debuted in 1996, few suspected the extent to which academic libraries would come to rely upon the big deal, that it would become “king” - the primary channel by which we procure academic journal content for our faculty, students, and staff. Yet, as budget cuts take their toll on libraries, the demise of the reigning big deal model seems inevitable as the true value of all-inclusive packages becomes less evident, particularly as innumerable titles within these packages remain unutilized and fail to add value to our serials offerings. SPARC’s Big Deal Cancellation Tracker is documenting this transition as an increasing number of libraries and consortia decide to forgo this model in favor of regaining local control over their collections and budget dollars via less restrictive packages. The Binghamton University Libraries is no exception. Recent curriculum changes and financial developments have prompted us to adopt an ongoing evaluation of our users’ information needs and proactively negotiate and cancel deals in order to better serve our constituents. This session will discuss our fact finding, workflow modifications, and data analysis processes as well as the outcomes of our adventures in pursuing and planning for the cancellation of multi-year, flexible agreements with vendors based on local collection development priorities and serials budget realities. Attendees will learn effective strategies for working with vendors to customize sustainable subscription agreements. A brief question and answer will conclude the session.

Speakers
avatar for Stephanie Hess

Stephanie Hess

Electronic Resources Librarian, Binghamton University (SUNY)
Stephanie P. Hess has worked in a variety of Technical Services positions since 1998. She is currently the Electronic Resources Librarian at Binghamton University (SUNY) and possesses an extensive background in acquisitions, cataloging, collection development, and serials managem... Read More →
JG

James Galbraith

Head of Collection Development,, Binghamton University (State University of New York)


Wednesday November 6, 2019 3:30pm - 4:10pm
Grand Ballroom 1, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

3:30pm

“The Evolution of Ebook collections: learning something new every day”
The evolution of the eBook procurement has been underway for some time and yet many libraries are still developing their procedures and strategies for an eBook collections. This presentation is focused on bringing the attendees up-to-date on the various aspects of eBook collection development and offering a vision for continued growth. This session will be presented in two parts. The first part will discuss issues revolving around acquiring eBooks and migrating from a print focused collection to one that primarily emphasizes electronic format. The second will discuss the merits and issues involved in moving your collection strategy to an Ebook-preferred collection. It will also discuss the various issues involved in choosing and implementing an eBook package and a DDA Program.

Speakers
avatar for Jack Montgomery

Jack Montgomery

Professor, Coordinator, Acquisitions and Collection Services, Western Kentucky University Libraries
avatar for Glenda Alvin

Glenda Alvin

Associate Professor, Assistant Director for Collection Management and Administration Head, Acquisitions and Serials, Library, Tennessee State University


Wednesday November 6, 2019 3:30pm - 4:10pm
Calhoun Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:30pm

Stopwatch Session 2: Systems
The Future of Libraries is Open: Updates, Demos, and Plans for the FOLIO Library Services Platform (Jesse Koennecke) ---
The FOLIO Library Services Platform is here. Learn about this innovative open source community project, see how it works, and find out why the Future of Libraries is Open. In this session, members of the FOLIO community will discuss the nature of the project and how ideas are turned into reality. Presenters will demo current functionality and integrations with knowledgebases and other third-party tools. As libraries prepare to implement FOLIO, what does the future hold that motivates them to be involved in this movement.

Wherever discovery starts: the library’s critical role in connecting users to content in a world of fragmented access (Emily Singley, Kendall Bartsch) ---
The contrast between researcher expectations and the reality of what it takes to get a full text article is stark. This presentation will discuss these expectations, the challenges preventing them from being fully met and how users are responding as a result.

When starting within the library, users face challenges navigating multiple vendor platforms, using systems like link resolvers, and understanding library-centric naming conventions. All of which are often confusing or time consuming to use. When starting from outside the library, researchers face paywalls, often for content they are entitled to access. All act as impediments to the research process and run counter-grain to user expectation. These challenges have pushed researchers to seek content socially, from networked sites such as Twitter and ResearchGate to pirate sites like Sci-Hub.

The presentation will discuss the emergence of new technologies that aim to simplify access to content, both when starting in and outside the library. The attributes of these new services and experiences of libraries using them will be discussed.

Let the APIs Bring Your Digital Content Together: NISO FASTEN (Nettie Lagace) ---
One of the biggest barriers for library digital patrons is navigating between the many content platforms libraries must offer to ensure a depth and variety of digital content. Having to create an account for two, or three, or more vendors makes for a confusing and fragmented experience. Libraries need to be able to offer all their digital content in one easy-to-use, integrated, and comprehensive platform--a platform that can be accessed and operated by the devices most commonly used by library patrons.

A NISO working group is developing a Recommended Practice that will allow this vision to become a reality. The FASTEN (NISO Flexible API STandard for E-content NISO) Working Group scope includes areas such as login/authentication, account information, availability, item status, item check-out, audio/video/online recording streaming, patron registration with vendor(s), etc. Attendees will learn in six minutes how they can support this work and communicate with others about its advantages!

e-Resource Troubleshooting: a Staff Training Strategy (Christee Pascale, Li Ma) ---
Troubleshooting subscription e-resource access is a complex task that lives at the intersection of specialized serial subscription knowledge and the convergence of technologies like discovery tools, authentication and proxy servers. Technical Service departments consider providing access to the library’s electronic collection a frontline service. When access issues are reported staff performing troubleshooting cease other work to address the outage, creating stress and straining fundamental departmental workflow support. The more staff equipped to perform e-resource troubleshooting, the better a department can manage this responsibility. With growing electronic collections and static staffing for e-resource subscriptions and management, the University of South Carolina Thomas Cooper Library is undertaking training staff who currently work with print resources to perform e-resource troubleshooting. Join us for a lively presentation where we consider the intricate e-resource landscape including how patrons interact with the libraries e-collection, how access issues are reported, the most common types of access problems, and our thoughts on the most effective ways to tackle and train staff to handle e-resource access issues.

Systems and the application of complexity in academic libraries (Seth Porter) ---
Academic libraries are complex systems, and need operational processes that are interoperable with this reality. Throughout this paper the author will illustrate the need for a systems understanding of operational performance. This school of thought focuses on the interlinking relationships between systems, subsystems, and actors within an organization (Katz & Khan, 1966). This is uniquely applicable to academic libraries because of the complexity of the many different roles.

Unlike profit-driven organizations, the output of academic libraries is not as clear, and this can lead to processes and models of organization that can seem like anarchy to organizational practitioners and theorists. However, there are models that incorporate this perceived anarchy into the performance process, such as systems theory which illustrates the diffuse and diverse nature of higher education and its subsystems, including the library. (Katz & Khan, 1966). While systems theory is inadequate by itself to describe and manage a higher education organization, it is a foundation theory and model to understand various goals, missions, departments, and stakeholders involved in higher education, including academic libraries.
This proposal is unique in the application of organizational theory to higher education and specifically, academic libraries. Understanding outside literature and its relevance to the academic library is vital for the 21st century. We cannot just reference other library literature, innovation from diffusion is a must.

The participants will walk away from this presentation with a foundation in a practical and applicable organizational theory and relevant processes to improve organizational performance. The session will engage the audience through a theoretical discussion, applicable insights, and a lively active case study that the participants will analyze through the potential application of the frameworks covered.

Moderators
avatar for Liya Deng

Liya Deng

Social Sciences Librarian, Eastern Washington University

Speakers
avatar for Nettie Lagace

Nettie Lagace

Associate Executive Director, NISO - National Information Standards Organization
Nettie Lagace is the Associate Executive Director at NISO, where she is responsible for facilitating the work of NISO's topic committees and development groups for standards and best practices, and working with the community to encourage broad adoption of this consensus work. Prior... Read More →
avatar for Jesse Koennecke

Jesse Koennecke

Director, Acquisitions & E-Resource Licensing, Cornell University
Ask me about Battledecks@ER&L!
avatar for Kendall Bartsch

Kendall Bartsch

CEO, Third Iron
I am the co-founder of Third Iron, working with an amazing team to deliver useful products, including BrowZine and LibKey. Our services address contemporary user challenges by simplifying workflow and expediting access to content, all while keeping the library at the heart of the... Read More →
avatar for Christee Pascale

Christee Pascale

Head of Acquisitions, University of South Carolina
avatar for Li Ma

Li Ma

Electronic Resource & Serials Librarian, University of South Carolina
avatar for Seth Porter

Seth Porter

Head of Donald E. Stokes Library, Princeton University
avatar for Emily Singley

Emily Singley

Head Librarian, Systems & Applications, Boston College
I manage library technology at a mid-sized University in the Boston area. I'm interested in how users access and navigate library systems, and am an active member of the Coalition for Seamless Access project.



Wednesday November 6, 2019 3:30pm - 4:10pm
Pinckney Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

4:25pm

A EuroVision: Plan S, Horizon Europe and More
Newly retired as of October 31, 2019, Michael Mabe will speak about Plan S and what to expect down the road from the EU. Michael will speak as an industry expert rather than as the voice of STM so put on your listening caps!

Moderators
avatar for Matthew Ismail

Matthew Ismail

Director of Collection Development, Central Michigan University Libraries

Speakers
MM

Michael Mabe

Principal, Ladysmith Associates
International expert on scholarly communication and publishing; 40 years in academic publishing, last 14 as CEO of STM; Visiting Professor at UCL and Adjunct Professor at University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Experience with publishing government affairs, especailly in China, Japan... Read More →


Wednesday November 6, 2019 4:25pm - 5:25pm
Grand Ballroom 2, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

4:25pm

Hyde Park Debate
This will be another in our irregular series of Hyde Park Debates. The proposition to be debated this year is "Resolved: Preprint servers have improved the scholarly communication system."

The structure of the event follows roughly the outline of a formal Oxford Union debate: we begin the proceedings by polling the audience to determine how many agree and how many disagree with the proposition. Then our debaters take the stage: Each delivers a prepared, ten-minute statement, one arguing against the proposition, and the other in favor. Then each gives a three-minute response to the other’s statement. Then we open the floor to discussion with the audience. Following the discussion, we poll the audience again, and whichever debater has moved the most votes is declared the winner.

Oya Rieger (Ithaka S+R, formerly of arXiv) has agreed to argue in favor of the proposition, and Kent Anderson (Caldera Publishing Solutions) will argue against it. Rick Anderson will serve as moderator and timekeeper.

Moderators
avatar for Rick Anderson

Rick Anderson

Assoc. Dean for Collections & Schol Comm, University of Utah

Speakers
avatar for Oya Y. Rieger

Oya Y. Rieger

Senior Advisor, Ithaka S+R
Oya Y. Rieger collaborates with Ithaka S+R’s Libraries, Scholarly Communication, and Museums program. She researches and advises on projects that reexamine the nature of collections within the research library, help secure access to and preservation of the scholarly record, and... Read More →
KA

Kent Anderson

Founder, Caldera Publishing Solutions


Wednesday November 6, 2019 4:25pm - 5:25pm
Grand Ballroom 1, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

4:25pm

Working with Libraries to turn Wikipedia References Blue
In an era of disinformation, libraries provide access to published, vetted materials that can be cited and used to establish facts in published research and online platforms, such as Wikipedia. But all too often those books are only available in print and held by libraries far from the researcher. For many digital learners, if a book isn't available online, it's as if it doesn't exist. Facilitated by Wendy Hanamura, Director of Partnerships at Internet Archive, this panel will bring together Brewster Kahle, digital librarian and founder of Internet Archive, and Dustin Hollan, CEO of Better World Books, to discuss how these two organizations are working together to supply and digitize books needed to turn the cited references in Wikipedia into active links. Laura Irmscher, Chief of Collections at Boston Public Library, will reflect on how libraries can mobilize their collections to meet this grand challenge.

Moderators
avatar for Athena Hoeppner

Athena Hoeppner

Discovery Services Librarian, University of Central Florida Libraries

Speakers
avatar for Brewster Kahle

Brewster Kahle

Founder and Digital Librarian, Internet Archive
A passionate advocate for public Internet access and a successful entrepreneur, Brewster Kahle has spent his career intent on a singular focus: providing Universal Access to All Knowledge. He is the founder and Digital Librarian of the Internet Archive, one of the largest libraries... Read More →
avatar for Wendy Hanamura

Wendy Hanamura

Director of Partnerships, Internet Archive
Wendy Hanamura is Producer of the DWeb Camp, and DWeb Summits in 2018 & 2016..As Director of Partnerships at the Internet Archive, one of the world’s largest digital libraries, Hanamura has helped guide the strategic direction of the Internet Archive since 2014. Passionate about... Read More →
avatar for Dustin Holland

Dustin Holland

President & CEO, BetterWorld Books
"One man's trash is another man's treasure." This is an idiom that fueled Dustin to launch the Better World Books Library Discards & Donations program in 2004. After talking with more than 100 librarians about the challenges of surplus books, Dustin had an epiphany that has translated... Read More →
avatar for Chris Freeland

Chris Freeland

Director of Open Libraries, Internet Archive
Chris Freeland is the Director of Open Libraries at the Internet Archive, working with partners in the library world to select, source, digitize and lend the most useful books for scholars, students, library patrons and people with disabilities around the world. Before joining the... Read More →
LI

Laura Irmscher

Chief of Collections, Boston Public Library


Wednesday November 6, 2019 4:25pm - 5:25pm
Grand Ballroom 3, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

5:30pm

Poster Session 1
Sponsored by Web of Science Group

2019 Poster Session Archive

This year, for the first time, the Charleston Conference poster format will be totally virtual, enabling each presenter to include interactive graphics, videos, and images in their posters.

The poster session will be held on Wednesday, November 6, 5:30 - 7:00 pm in the Carolina Ballroom of the Francis Marion Hotel, the Conference headquarters hotel. The posters will be presented in two consecutive sessions lasting 40 minutes each: 5:30 - 6:10 pm and 6:20 - 7:00 pm. They will be separated by a 10-minute break to enable an orderly transition from the first session to the second.

You will also notice that in the program we have assigned each poster a number i.e. S1-01, S1-02, S1-03 or S2-01, S2-02, S2-03. These numbers signifying the session number followed by the station number. So Poster S1-01 is part of the first session and is located at station 1 while Poster S2-02 is part of the second session and is located at station 2.

Sponsors
avatar for Web of Science Group, a Clarivate Analytics company

Web of Science Group, a Clarivate Analytics company

Web of Science Group, a Clarivate Analytics company, organizes the world’s research information to enable academia, corporations, publishers and governments to accelerate the pace of research.https://clarivate.com/webofsciencegroup/solutions/contact-us/... Read More →


Wednesday November 6, 2019 5:30pm - 6:10pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

5:30pm

S1-01 The time has come... to build, reflect, and analyze connections between qualitative and quantitative data
This presentation will address the development process of a qualitative evaluation tool to aid in the thorough analysis of library resources at the University of Maryland. Specifically, our project looks at the use and added value of this tool for the building, reflecting, and analyzing connections between qualitative and quantitative data. This will allow for more meaningful justifications of budgetary decisions than compared to cost and use metrics alone. Given the necessity for meticulous review of continuing resources, our project addresses a request for enhanced transparency from the university faculty and library oversight body and serves as a useful tool for accountability and justification of impactful decisions for stakeholders internally and externally. We will discuss the extant literature and the need for this type of tool, the development process including the output planning and data input format, the initial reception of the project, and future goals and planning for our initial usage. Additionally, we will demonstrate the use of the tool, model the output, and discuss options for visualizations, storage, and retrieval of input data. Attendees will explore the evaluation tool in real time using Mentimeter to evaluate the qualitative characteristics of a test database.

Speakers
avatar for Leigh Ann DePope

Leigh Ann DePope

Head of Acquisitions and Data Services, University of Maryland College Park
SR

Stephanie Ritchie

Agriculture and Natural Resources Librarian, University of Maryland College Park
avatar for Jordan Sly

Jordan Sly

Anthropology, Psychology, and Special Populations Librarian, University of Maryland College Park


Wednesday November 6, 2019 5:30pm - 6:10pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

5:30pm

S1-02 The Forest and the Trees: What Circulation Turnover Rates Tell Us about Literature Collections in Academic Libraries
This presentation will report on the findings of a large study of the circulation rates of contemporary literary (primary) texts in ten areas of literature (English, American, German, French, Italian, Spanish, Latin American, Chinese, Japanese, and Russian) over the past twenty years at the University of Oregon Knight Library. After a brief discussion of methods, the circulation turnover rate (CTR), for each subject area, per year and per dollar spent, will be considered. In order to understand the meaning of these rates, the respective CTRs will be contextualized through five kinds of comparisons: with each other, with the CTRs for the secondary texts in the same call number range and time period, with the CTR for the library collection as a whole, with the CTRs of the same call number domains of other academic libraries and, in the case of foreign language texts, with the CTR for English translations. An analysis of the principal trends and patterns in the data will lead to group discussion of the general question of the value of CTR as a measure of collection performance, an important topic on which the existing literature is surprisingly scant. What is a good CTR? What considerations bear on the interpretation of the CTR as an index of the work of the collection and what implications do the findings from this study of CTRs have for acquisition strategies? A further question to be taken up is what sort of historical responsibilities have academic libraries borne with respect to current literary production: how have academic libraries traditionally conceived their roles and responsibilities towards the collection of primary texts as vital components of the cultural record, and to what extent must today’s academic libraries rethink that historical relationship in response to budgetary constraints?

Speakers
JS

Jeff Staiger

Literature Librarian, University of Oregon
Collection development, fund allocations, literature, physical vs. electronic books...


Wednesday November 6, 2019 5:30pm - 6:10pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

5:30pm

S1-03 The research interests of graduate students in Jamaica reflect national urgency: So what are their information needs?
Jamaica is still focused on boosting economic growth after 57 years of political independence from Britain. Young adults need more opportunities, decent work and housing. A reduction in poverty and crime are also priorities.  The 2019 national budget has allocated funds for research by higher education academics but on national priority topics. The leading university in Jamaica, the University of the West Indies  is committed to supporting the Caribbean region`s urgent needs and in 2019 continues to emphasize research for social and economic development. Graduate students pursuing research under the guidance of their supervisors have aligned their research to topics of national interest e.g. the medicinal benefits of indigenous plants, housing needs, education, drug trafficking and disaster management.
This poster presentation will give a broad overview of the topics selected for research by graduate students against the background of the development priorities of one Caribbean island nation.

Speakers
avatar for Jacqueline Howell Nash

Jacqueline Howell Nash

Graduate students` librarian, University of the West Indies (Mona)
I have been a librarian for only 7 years and enjoy working one-on-one with graduate students of varying ages. Previously I worked as a Social Worker and then as an Administrator, first in central government and then in higher education. At my university the professional librarians... Read More →


Wednesday November 6, 2019 5:30pm - 6:10pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

5:30pm

S1-04 Talking of many things: dashboards for reference services decision making
Visualizations and dashboards can be extremely valuable for decision-making. They reveal patterns and trends not otherwise evident when data is presented in numerical, tabular form. However continuous communication and iteration are needed to ensure dashboards remain relevant and current while serving managers’ needs.

Staffing challenges are well-documented in reference services, but the use of dashboards to support data-driven scheduling for in-person and virtual reference shifts are not often discussed. This poster examines how MSUL utilized data-influenced decision-making and dashboard design iterations to streamline reference staffing and adapt to evolving conditions over the course of three years. It illustrates the dynamic interaction of external context and internal factors that drive decision-making. The importance of flexibility and communication on the part of the manager and the analyst are highlighted. Limitations of a purely quantitative data-driven strategy are also revealed at the conclusion of the final year.

Speakers
avatar for Hui Hua Chua

Hui Hua Chua

Collections and User Support Librarian, Michigan State University
RM

Rachel Minkin

Head of Reference Services, Michigan State University Libraries


Wednesday November 6, 2019 5:30pm - 6:10pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

5:30pm

S1-05 Statistical Stories: Visualizing Usage Statistics with Tableau Public
This poster presentation will share our library’s explorations into utilizing data visualization software for the purpose of visualizing and analyzing usage statistics, with a specific focus on Alma Analytics and Tableau Public.

We will provide brief background information to explain the purpose and necessity behind our decision to investigate data visualization possibilities, including our determination regarding the value of usage statistics and their potential to help with strategic planning.

We will illustrate possible issues in the course of selecting, collecting and preparing data for visualization including data verification, aggregation problems, and formulation of “tidy” data. We will exhibit the process of exploratory analysis of findings, possible reworking of data, in-depth analysis of findings, patterns and trends, discussion of insights gained, and presentation of findings to stakeholders. We will share anecdotes of our experiences learning and using Alma Analytics and Tableau Public, including licensing and confidentiality of data, and factors that determined our choices to use those tools.

Finally, we will display future possibilities for data visualization in libraries.

Speakers
KG

Kathy Gehring

Serials & E Resorces Librarian, Connecticut College
LL

Lori Looney

Technical Service and E-Resources Specialist, Connecticut College


Wednesday November 6, 2019 5:30pm - 6:10pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

5:30pm

S1-06 A River Ran Through It: How to Build a Library Collection after a Natural Disaster
A River Ran Through It: How to Re-Build a Library Collection after a Natural Disaster
This proposed poster session will explain the two-year rebuilding process after Hurricane Harvey hit Lone Star College- Kingwood Library in the Houston, Texas area. It will emphasize how to survive and eventually thrive in a constant state of change. It will focus on rebuilding a book collection after a total loss. Purchasing decisions, format decisions, and how to spend the budget to please both faculty and administration will be discussed. The poster session will focus on what was ultimately purchased in print and in eBook formats, faculty and administration feedback on the collection, and student feedback on the collection and new library as a whole. Audience will gain insight on lessons learned in the process such as how to work within FEMA guidelines, importance of good leadership and proper disaster planning. Lastly, it will discuss what changes will be made in the future with respect to the library book collection.

Speakers
HL

Hope LeJeune

Librarian, LSC-Kingwood


Wednesday November 6, 2019 5:30pm - 6:10pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

5:30pm

S1-07 Acquiring Teamwork: Resource lifecycles utilizing Alma and each other
Oftentimes acquiring or cancelling a resource is more complex in practice than in theory. This poster will showcase what the process actually looks like from start to finish, whether print or electronic in format. In addition to team members within our library’s collection services unit, many other internal and external stakeholders are involved. This poster will seek to demonstrate a tangible depiction of how this all works through Alma, our integrated library system, and Primo, our discovery service.

It would be relevant for any attendees who utilize Alma and Primo, or are in the planning stages. Showing practical steps within our own library’s acquisition’s workflow makes it unique. Hopefully it will engage the audience in thinking about their own methods and communication tactics through visualization utilizing graphics.

Speakers
avatar for Jaclyn Parrott

Jaclyn Parrott

Assistant Professor and Collection Maintenance Librarian, Eastern Washington University



Wednesday November 6, 2019 5:30pm - 6:10pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

5:30pm

S1-08 When you don't know what you don't know: How new collections librarians rightsized a collections budget
In the fall of 2018, due to impending campus-wide budget downsizing, the Grand Valley State University (GVSU) Libraries projected that a worst case scenario would result in a 14% cut to the library’s collections budget for fiscal year 2020. In the same year, GVSU Libraries welcomed several new members of its leadership team, including the Dean, two Associate Deans, Head of Systems, Head of Collections, Business Administrator, and left with a vacancy to fill after the Acquisitions Manager of 26 years retired.
 
Budget cuts and staff turnover are tough, but they are part of library life, plus they prompted a much-needed reassessment of roles, culture, and priorities of the library. Different approaches to spending and curating the library’s collections were vital to counteract the budgetary challenges. Cara Cadena, the new Head of Collections, was charged with building a task force to recommend cancellations and a plan to communicate these changes across campus, all within a six-month timeframe. Decisions were made based on feedback gathered from teaching faculty, liaison librarians, campus stakeholders, and usage data. Ultimately, the communication plan proved to be the most critical--and challenging--part of the process. The amount of time spent visiting departments, collecting feedback, and ensuring every measure was taken to make these cancellations seamless was remarkable.
 
In this session, Cara and Marcia will discuss successes, missteps, results, the importance of vendor relationships, and future plans for collection management at GVSU. Attendees will gain insights into leveraging stakeholder buy-in and grasping opportunities amidst constant change (and decreased funding) in order to evolve effectively. They’ll also learn how GVSU Libraries are reimagining the role of the collections team.

Speakers
avatar for Cara  Cadena

Cara Cadena

Head of Collections and Digital Scholarship, Grand Valley State University
Cara has been working professionally in both public and academic libraries for over 10 years. Her current role challenges her to find creative solutions to old problems. She is interested in leveraging community partnerships, testing acquisition models, and trying new things to support... Read More →
avatar for Marcia Lee

Marcia Lee

eResources & Acquisitions Librarian, Grand Valley State University
Marcia completed her MLIS through the University of Alabama in May 2017 and started at Grand Valley State University (GVSU) in June 2017. Her first position at GVSU was as an Electronic Resources Management Specialist, and she moved into the role of eResources and Acquisitions Librarian... Read More →


Wednesday November 6, 2019 5:30pm - 6:10pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

5:30pm

S1-09 Digital Archives: What Researchers Need from Platforms
This presentation offers a librarian’s perspective on what researchers need when using digitized historical materials online. Digital archive products already do much well, but there is also always room for change and improvements of one kind or another, whether of a technical, descriptive, or conceptual nature. This talk will encompass issues of user experience but also go beyond them in addressing the research process more broadly and commenting on the ways in which digital archive products do or do not facilitate that process in the present moment.

Without question, the digitization of historical materials has significantly altered the landscape of scholarly research for humanists and humanistic social scientists. Previously distant archives can be consulted and used as never before. But what happens when, for instance, some of an object’s archival description is missing, the original order of a series of documents is obscured, or the ability to browse related materials is lost in the online environment? These and related questions will be put forward by this presentation, which will outline the features and functions of digital archives most needed to support scholarly research. Successful elements of digital archives that are already in place as well as those that are yet to be developed, refined, or implemented will both be covered. The main takeaway will be a listing of the key features and functions of digital archives around which librarians, vendors, and scholars can all collaborate further going forward.

Speakers
avatar for James Kessenides

James Kessenides

Kaplanoff Librarian for American History, Yale University Library


Wednesday November 6, 2019 5:30pm - 6:10pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

5:30pm

S1-10 Step 1: Open the box. Step 2: Put materials on the shelf. Step 3: Repeat. Learn how to make your print workflows smarter
Though it may appear simple, there's a lot of thought behind these three steps. The Smithsonian Libraries would like to share the behind-the-scenes of how we work with shelf ready materials and records furnished through OCLC's WorldCat Cataloging Partners. Attendees will learn how we use MarcEdit to manipulate data and provide quality control; how we use macros to add linked data elements to records; and they will hear about the kinds of problems we encounter in the process. There will also be information on our newly formed working group to revise our shelf ready procedures from selection to receiving. Come and learn about the work and planning that goes into making it as easy as 1-2-3.



Speakers
HB

Heidy Berthoud

Head, Resource Description, Smithsonian Libraries


Wednesday November 6, 2019 5:30pm - 6:10pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

5:30pm

S1-11 Wrangling Weirdness: Lessons from Academic Law Library Collections
Academic law libraries face some challenges that are consistent with larger trends in higher education. However, there are unique or “quirky” aspects that shape the way collections are selected, evaluated, managed, and promoted. Most electronic resources designed for legal research do not generate COUNTER compliant usage data. Many subscription resources and services that libraries provide access to are primarily geared towards non-academic customers, such as law firms and corporations. Our patrons increasingly need and request research products that rely on data collection, personalization, and non-IP access controls, which complicates our professional commitment to things like preserving patron privacy and providing walk-in access. Law library technical services departments are perpetually negotiating these and other challenges to ensure the needs of law faculty and students are met as seamlessly as possible.

This poster will outline some of the most formidable collections challenges we face and the strategies and practices we employ to maintain some semblance of order and cohesion. Although some of the issues we will discuss are relatively unique to law libraries, several also resonate with those working with similarly specialized resources, such as business databases, datasets, etc. As libraries provide access to more diverse and eclectic materials, law librarians are not the only ones dealing with these complications and challenges. Attendees will learn about the quirks of collecting legal research materials and come away with some strategies and approaches that might strengthen or diversify their problem solving at their own institutions.

Speakers
avatar for Courtney McAllister

Courtney McAllister

Library Services Engineer, EBSCO Information Services
avatar for Megan Brown

Megan Brown

Acquisitions and Electronic Resources Librarian, University of South Carolina Law Library


Wednesday November 6, 2019 5:30pm - 6:10pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

5:30pm

S1-12 Collections Work at Non-ARL Institutions: Priorities & Practices
This poster will report on preliminary results of a survey exploring priorities, strategies, and challenges in libraries that do not belong to the Association of Research Libraries (ARL). This survey explores big-picture topics such as the future of collections, necessary skill sets, budgetary issues, and trends and patterns. Local issues are also of interest, including the impact and influence of institutional priorities on collections, adoption of new models of acquisition and access, investment in open access, data drive decision making, and marketing of collections. The poster will provide a different perspective on collection work writ large, identifying areas of commonality and difference.

Speakers
avatar for Stephanie Davis-Kahl

Stephanie Davis-Kahl

Collections & Scholarly Communications Librarian, Illinois Wesleyan University
Stephanie Davis-Kahl is the Collections & Scholarly Communications Librarian and Professor at The Ames Library at Illinois Wesleyan University. She provides leadership for collections management and scholarly communication programs, including Digital Commons @ IWU. She is the liaison... Read More →


Wednesday November 6, 2019 5:30pm - 6:10pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

5:30pm

S1-13 Deselection Dilemma: Incorporating Faculty Voices in Monograph Deselection
Weeding should be a regular aspect of a university library, but after years -- if not decades -- of inattention, a library’s focus on deselection can create worry and angst among faculty. This poster will present a case study from a private university library undertaking a multi-year, comprehensive monograph deselection program as part of a strategic commitment to transforming collections. Our approach is data-driven and criteria-based while allowing room for faculty input. Despite a significant body of professional literature demonstrating the value of a well-weeded collection, librarians face many pressures that discourage weeding, including concerns about patron displeasure. How can feedback from faculty be incorporated meaningfully into deselection without introducing barriers to efficiency?

This poster may be particularly relevant for attendees who are considering implementing a deselection program at their own institution, especially if they are undertaking a comprehensive monograph deselection for the first time. The case study examines a university library that is learning to carry out comprehensive deselection in phases over a number of years, applying effective communication and engagement strategies to incorporate faculty feedback and overcome traditional barriers to weeding.

This case study is somewhat unique in that it presents rule-based deselection using OCLC GreenGlass and data from a resource sharing network, incorporates faculty feedback in multiple ways, including seeking faculty input on the criteria used to define deselection rules, and because the multi-year comprehensive nature of the effort allows librarians to improve deselection criteria and communication strategies over time as they move through different LC call number ranges.

Speakers
avatar for Lev Rickards

Lev Rickards

AUL for Collections & Scholarly Communication, Santa Clara University


Wednesday November 6, 2019 5:30pm - 6:10pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

5:30pm

S1-14 PONI Up!: Using data to give students what they need
Point of Need Instruction (PONI) is a vital function the Research and Instruction Department provides at the College of Charleston. Our PONI services include interactions at the Access & Instruction Desk and through scheduled research consultations. This session will review how, for the past two years, a team of librarians have been collecting data through LibAnswers, surveys, and focus groups in order to better understand student awareness (and inherent use) of our PONI services. This data collection has played an immense role in understanding what students know about us and how we can "pony up" to give them better, and clearer, access to services that will improve their information literacy skills. Additionally, the session will discuss how “negative results” are not necessarily a “negative thing.” By sharing our findings, participants will not only learn ways to market their own services to students, but they will also learn ways to successfully collect data about their users’ experiences and how to interpret their data to create actionable items for the future.

Speakers
avatar for Elena Rodriguez

Elena Rodriguez

Instruction Coordinator, College of Charleston
avatar for Amanda Kraft

Amanda Kraft

User Experience Coordinator, College of Charleston
Amanda Kraft is the User Experience Coordinator in the Research & Instruction Department at College of Charleston (CofC) Libraries and serves as the subject liaison to the CofC School of Business and the Computer Science department.
avatar for Gretchen Scronce

Gretchen Scronce

Virtual Services Coordinator, College of Charleston


Wednesday November 6, 2019 5:30pm - 6:10pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

5:30pm

S1-15 The Right Place at the Right Time: Embedding Library Tutorials in EBSCOhost Databases
How do we provide point-of-need support to users as they navigate library databases? For years instruction and technical service librarians have struggled to answer this question. While important and significant strides have been made in creating e-learning content to support database exploration, these materials often remained buried under 2-3 clicks on the library website or in a research guide. This presentation will highlight Utah State University’s Online Learning Librarian’s journey to develop and embed database tutorials in several Ebscohost databases to provide point-of-need support to users both when and where they are.
The presenter will share the unique user testing methods utilized to develop the tutorials, observations from users regarding research, database navigation and tutorial design, and the process for embedding tutorials within the databases.

While the literature focusing on the importance creating relevant tutorials and integrating them at the point of need is in abundance, this session is unique as it offers strategies for embedding database tutorials directly where users encounter issues – the database itself - that they can access when they need it. Furthermore, this presentation offers suggestions on what users expect from a tutorial of this nature. This presentation is relevant to librarians who wish to develop and embed tutorials at their own institutions. Attendees will be asked to engage with each other throughout the session by engaging in Think-Pair-Shares and a brainstorming session at the end of the presentation on other opportunities to bring library help directly to our users at their point of need.

Speakers
avatar for Teagan Eastman

Teagan Eastman

Online Learning Librarian, Utah State University
Teagan is Utah State University’s Online Learning Librarian where she focuses on creating online learning materials, instructional design and technologies, user experience, and supporting USU’s large distance education program.


Wednesday November 6, 2019 5:30pm - 6:10pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

5:30pm

S1-16 Services Analyst and Collection Data Analyst: Adding Value to the Acquisitions Operation
What does a business or data analyst do?  How does adding an analyst to your team support your acquisitions librarian who is expected to introduce innovation, master emerging acquisitions strategies and methodologies, and maintain ongoing business and services?

This poster session will share the circumstances that prompted these questions at the Hesburgh Libraries of the University of Notre Dame, where two analysts were hired in the past year in the Resource Acquisitions & Discovery (RAD) program. The position descriptions for the RAD Services Analyst and Collection Data Analyst reflect skills drawn from non-library service and data industries, such as business, information technology, construction, and supply chain management. 

The session will offer tips for selling the idea of allocating limited staffing dollars to analyst positions dedicated to full time deep thinking, data analysis and support for a "business case through project management" workflow.  Recruiting approaches and interview techniques will be outlined and draft job descriptions will be made available. Finally, the benefits and challenges experienced by those who hold the positions will be shared, stressing how their skill set and viewpoint have resulted in successful project articulation, improved transactional workflow and service integration.

Speakers
avatar for Laura Sill

Laura Sill

Director, Resource Acquisitions & Discovery, University of Notre Dame



Wednesday November 6, 2019 5:30pm - 6:10pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

5:30pm

S1-17 Six Years of Running a Campus Open Access Publishing Fund. Where are we?
How much can $285,000 buy? Around 173 articles, as it turns out. Kansas State University launched an open access publishing fund in 2013 and it has remained active as of the end of the spring semester, 2019. The publishing fund, in short, is a subvention fund used to support the publishing of open access articles by the institution's researchers. K-State is one of many institutions who have launched such funds in the last 10 or so years. Since launching the fund, 221 requests for funding representing 37 different academic departments from around the institution have been reviewed resulting in 173 articles being published in gold open access, with a few more still in process. This poster will assess the K-State Open Access Publishing Fund since the program’s inception in 2013 by providing an overview of the program, the impact of the articles published using a diverse set of research impact metrics, demographics of awardees, compare the data to broader open access publishing trends, and provide conclusions. The assessment will seek to determine if or how well the publishing fund has met its founding four goals and provide a cost-benefit analysis of the program, attempting to answer what did the program accomplish and how much did it cost to do it.

Speakers
avatar for Ryan Otto

Ryan Otto

Scholarly Communication Librarian, Kansas State University Libraries
Native Floridian living in the Flint Hills of Kansas. Scholarly Communication - Copyright - Open access - Digital publishing - Open educational resources - Digital Repositories


Wednesday November 6, 2019 5:30pm - 6:10pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

5:30pm

S1-18 The homegrown ERMS: Relic of the past, or wave of the future?
Vendors of electronic resource management systems face a dilemma: Develop software around specific libraries’ workflows and risk alienating other libraries; aim for the lowest common denominator and miss the opportunity to deeply satisfy any particular library. Built on the “freemium” database app Airtable, my homegrown ERMS named RELIC has the potential both to meet libraries’ needs better—if they are willing to retrofit it to their specifications—and to give vendors tangible insight into library workflows without the mutual expense of development partnerships. Airtable’s cloud platform allows easy copying and sharing of my database (using dummy data) with any interested party. Airtable has a much lower barrier to entry than SQL or even Microsoft Access, and its cleverly documented APIs may allow data sharing with library services platforms. In RELIC, I have structured my metadata for easy import during future systems migrations while adding immense immediate value through relational links. This poster illustrates some key results available in RELIC and the process by which I achieved them. Through their evaluation and critique of this new DIY entry into the ERMS marketplace, attendees can strengthen the library-technology ecosystem.

Speakers
avatar for Robert Heaton

Robert Heaton

Collection Management Librarian, Utah State University
Looking for answers: How will we keep paying for all this stuff? How are we going to archive all this digital stuff? How can we align author incentives, the publishing marketplace, and the future of the scholarly record? When will libraries benefit from well-designed free software... Read More →


Wednesday November 6, 2019 5:30pm - 6:10pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

5:30pm

S1-19 APIs: A Tool for Many Things, including Collections Analysis
Librarians who work with collection data sometimes spend extensive time running reports or looking up information. At Temple University, we regularly check our own and other libraries’ holdings when reviewing lists of missing or damaged books in order to decide which to re-purchase. A recent switch to using API queries instead of manually looking up holdings in WorldCat or our ILS has nearly eliminated tedious and time-consuming look-up processes. An API is a protocol for transferring data between two databases or systems. A script, written in a language such as R or Python, queries the database and returns data to the user.  This poster shows a query the presenter wrote using the R programming, which retrieved WorldCat holdings for 600 titles in less than 30 minutes. The poster also notes other recurring projects that rely on the Alma, Primo, and World Cat Search APIs and contains a short bibliography of resources for people who want to learn more about APIs.

Speakers
avatar for Karen Kohn

Karen Kohn

Collections Analysis Librarian, Temple University



Wednesday November 6, 2019 5:30pm - 6:10pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

5:30pm

S1-20 Making the Invisible Visible: Using Portfolio/project Management to Create and Online Presence That Delivers Content and Services at Scale
Georgia Tech's Library Next grew from a building renovation into a total reinvention of the Library for the 21st century. A key part of Library Next is the creation of an online presence that delivers services and content at scale. Learn how the Georgia Tech Library used portfolio and project management to change a dated website into a modern, top-shelf Drupal platform. The result is a highly customizable and technologically advance website that puts the Library in a leadership position among campus and higher education peers. This session will focus of the context of the online presence transformation, the Library's portfolio and project management strategy, and the design and development involved in creating the new website.

Speakers
avatar for Heather Jeffcoat

Heather Jeffcoat

Web & Discovery Management Librarian, Georgia Tech Library
CM

Catherine Murray-Rust

Dean of Libraries, Georgia Institute of Technology



Wednesday November 6, 2019 5:30pm - 6:10pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

5:45pm

Job Board Networking
New for 2019! Job posting board will be placed in the Calhoun Room. Come by to check out the posted openings, and network with others in the Career Services area. As an employer you will have the opportunity to post job opportunities at your institution and meet with prospective candidates during the Wednesday meet and greet (5:45 PM – 6:45 PM in Francis Marion Hotel). We are seeking employers from a wide array of fields including librarians, archivists, publishers, and library administrators. The bulletin board and postings will be available for the rest of the conference in the hallway near the Information Desk on the Mezzanine Level.

Wednesday November 6, 2019 5:45pm - 6:45pm
Calhoun Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:20pm

Poster Session 2
Sponsored by Web of Science Group

2019 Poster Session Archive

This year, for the first time, the Charleston Conference poster format will be totally virtual, enabling each presenter to include interactive graphics, videos, and images in their posters.

The poster session will be held on Wednesday, November 6, 5:30 - 7:00 pm in the Carolina Ballroom of the Francis Marion Hotel, the Conference headquarters hotel. The posters will be presented in two consecutive sessions lasting 40 minutes each: 5:30 - 6:10 pm and 6:20 - 7:00 pm. They will be separated by a 10-minute break to enable an orderly transition from the first session to the second.

You will also notice that in the program we have assigned each poster a number i.e. S1-01, S1-02, S1-03 or S2-01, S2-02, S2-03. These numbers signifying the session number followed by the station number. So Poster S1-01 is part of the first session and is located at station 1 while Poster S2-02 is part of the second session and is located at station 2.

Sponsors
avatar for Web of Science Group, a Clarivate Analytics company

Web of Science Group, a Clarivate Analytics company

Web of Science Group, a Clarivate Analytics company, organizes the world’s research information to enable academia, corporations, publishers and governments to accelerate the pace of research.https://clarivate.com/webofsciencegroup/solutions/contact-us/... Read More →


Wednesday November 6, 2019 6:20pm - 7:00pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

6:20pm

S2-01 Collections Data, Tools, and Strategy: Applying R, Tableau and Excel to Print Assessment
As is the case at most academic libraries, collection assessment has become an essential component of collection management and development work. Although much of the assessment focus has disproportionately fallen on e-resources, print collections remain fruitful areas for evaluation and review. At Emory, print collections, including a complex approval plan, continue to be a significant component of our overarching collection strategy (in volume and expenditure). However, shifting priorities for library space and the growth of interdisciplinary programs and centers within the University are placing a higher demand on subject librarians for communication and coordinated decision-making regarding print acquisitions. As a result, we are currently preparing for a comprehensive print collection review, of which the approval plan is an integral component. This assessment will inform a more coherent print strategy, which effectively and efficiently meets research and teaching requirements as well as administrative needs. Using data cleaning and visualization tools, such as R, Excel, and Tableau, we have enriched our local usage data with detailed Gobi approval data (e.g., series, publisher, subject, etc.) and profile parameters. Merging these data types and enriching local use data will allow us to analyze the print collection in a more nuanced fashion and ask questions that do not require the LC classification framework. This analysis considers the development of additional tools and approaches that facilitate subject specialist communication with collection management and overall collaborative decision-making, especially in cross disciplinary areas. We will show how our process and data enhancement could be applied to other print approval plans.

Speakers
CP

Christopher Palazzolo

Head of Collections, Emory University
LJ

Lori Jahnke

Anthropology Librarian, Emory University


Wednesday November 6, 2019 6:20pm - 7:00pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

6:20pm

S2-02 Creating E-Resource Dashboards to Foster Liaison Librarian Engagement with the Collection
In our library with a lean staff and a fledgling liaison model, management of serials and electronic resources rests with one individual. Because liaisons to academic departments are not necessarily experts in those disciplines, they may be less familiar with our current resources: Why do we have this database? Who uses this journal? Some legacy resources persist year-to-year like so many elephants in a room, with no institutional memory available to advocate for them. This poster outlines how the Electronic Resources Librarian used Google Apps to create dashboards for each liaison librarian, providing them with easily digestible usage statistics, trends, potential acquisitions, and budget concerns. Data that previously existed only in email threads, hard drives, file cabinets, the ILS, and MOUs has been brought together in a shared, cloud-based system. Each dashboard can be customized to the particular preferences of liaisons, whether to build familiarity with the collection or to provide timely data to answer faculty questions. Furthermore, with consistently flat or shrinking budgets, this system allows liaisons to see the effects of inflation on their disciplines’ resources, leading to collaborative—rather than contentious—conversations about the budget.

Speakers
avatar for John Tiffin

John Tiffin

Electronic Resources Librarian, Biola University
I manage our library's serials, e-resources, and ILL department. I enjoy the challenge of helping tailor our collection to keep our academic departments and budget office happy.


Wednesday November 6, 2019 6:20pm - 7:00pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

6:20pm

S2-03 Reengineering Acquisitions Infrastructure in Alma: Vendor Records in a Time of Transition
Literature on vendor records in integrated library systems (ILS) is sparse; the little that does exist is proprietary to one system or another. This lack of scholarly treatment supports the assumption that vendor records are perfunctory and that creating them consists primarily of data entry. But are vendor records really that one dimensional? After 26 years with the same ILS, Gettysburg College migrated to Alma in June 2019. As the library reimagined a new acquisition infrastructure, disambiguating vendors proved especially enlightening and revealed exactly where and with whom we were spending our funds. This poster will provide some practical advice and add a case study to the literature for how to organize vendor records for purposes of vendor negotiations and institutional transparency.

Speakers
avatar for Jeremy Garskof

Jeremy Garskof

Director of Technical Services, Gettysburg College


Wednesday November 6, 2019 6:20pm - 7:00pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

6:20pm

S2-04 “Curiouser and curiouser:” The process of creating, maintaining, and migrating a bibliographic database of assessment resources
Poster Contributor: Rachel Fleming-May, Associate Professor, University of Tennessee School of Information Sciences

In 2009, a small team began working on an annotated bibliography of assessment resources in connection with an Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS)-grant funded research project. Over several months the design and objective of the project changed, and in 2011 a dynamic bibliographic database of 1000 individual resources, accompanied by a homegrown controlled vocabulary created by the initial team, went live. In the years since, the bibliographic database has continued to evolve and grow, and now includes over 4000 resources representing a broad collection of disciplines and item formats. As part of its latest expansion, the team added records for individual items (papers and posters) published in the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) Library Assessment Conference Proceedings, 2006-2016, previously not indexed in any other source. Most recently, the database was moved to a new content management system, which has changed its appearance and functionality.

This poster will focus on the challenge and adventure of conceiving, creating, maintaining, and adding value to such a large-scale resource. The presenters—the original creator of the first iteration of the database and its controlled vocabulary, the team member who made the most recent update and oversaw the database’s migration to its new online home, and the graduate student who is currently analyzing characteristics of the database contents and updating the controlled vocabulary—will describe the project from conception to its most recent transformation. Attendees with an interest in content management, project management, assessment, or scholarly communication will find value in this presentation, which will be an honest audit of the successes and stumbles the team experienced over the years. Audience members will have the opportunity to ask questions about the nuts-and-bolts of creating and maintaining such a resource, and will be encouraged to make suggestions for improving it.

Speakers
avatar for Emily McCutcheon

Emily McCutcheon

MSIS Graduate Student, University of Tennessee School of Information Sciences
avatar for Brianne Dosch

Brianne Dosch

Social Sciences Data Librarian, University of Tennessee - Knoxville
I partner with social sciences researchers to connect them with the data and resources they need to succeed. I try to bring passion and excitement to everything I do, which sometimes includes referencing Harry Potter, travel, and cats. I love working with faculty and students alike... Read More →


Wednesday November 6, 2019 6:20pm - 7:00pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

6:20pm

S2-05 Hospitality Industry Data Sources
This poster will describe the various sources available for librarians to assist patrons with hospitality industry research. Hospitality sectors include hotels, restaurants, airlines, gaming, cruise lines, wine, travel & tourism, and more. A variety of data sources from commercial vendors (fee-based) as well as government agencies (free) will be highlighted.

Speakers
avatar for Ken Bolton

Ken Bolton

Collections Coordinator, Cornell University
I am the Collections Coordinator for the business libraries at Cornell University.


Wednesday November 6, 2019 6:20pm - 7:00pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

6:20pm

S2-06 The time has come... to MOVE Many Things: Inventorying and Preparing a Collection for Offsite Storage
In the spring of 2019, the Montana State University Library embarked on a large scale inventory project that involved weeding and moving portions of our collection to an offsite storage facility all in the name of creating much needed space for our constituents – all within six months! Our poster session will include the astonishing details of how we accomplished this. At the session, we will also outline how we advocated to our administration for extra help; how our newly merged Cataloging and Collection Development departments worked together to pull this off; the importance of having a project manager; working with an outside professional service; the types of work groups formed to identify new workflows and modify existing ones (i.e. how our collections would move between the Library and offsite storage !); our departments’ use of student workers and our collaborations with other library departments; how we communicated to our patrons in the library and beyond; and how the move and newly renovated spaces impacted our patrons. Additionally, we will share some interesting figures: how many books we weeded; the types of collections we kept at the library and the types we chose to move and why; the number of serial items without barcodes that were previously unlinked in our catalog (Ex Libris’ Alma); how many items we sold/donated and to whom; and more. We are excited to share what we learned and offer advice to other libraries who are planning their own weeding, inventory, and offsite moving projects.

Speakers
avatar for Hannah Mckelvey

Hannah Mckelvey

Electronic Resources & Discovery Services Librarian, Montana State University Library
Hannah McKelvey is an Assistant Professor and Electronic Resources & Discovery Services Librarian at MSU Library in Bozeman, Montana.
avatar for Rachelle McLain

Rachelle McLain

Collection Development Librarian, Montana State University


Wednesday November 6, 2019 6:20pm - 7:00pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

6:20pm

S2-07 UofSC Librarians and the Open Access Collection Development Policy
While collection development policies and processes at University of South Carolina Libraries have evolved through the decades, librarians recently discovered a large, unaddressed gap in content. Open access publications have increased in availability over the past several years but discovery in our library systems remained invisible. Join UofSC librarians as we discuss our quest to create a robust collection development policy for open access materials. We’ll cover everything from our early interactions with stakeholders in acquisitions and cataloging to our outreach discussions with liaison librarians. We’ll also discuss the creation of an early-stage policy, our multi-phase pilot, including our ghastly missteps, and our revised, final(ish) open access collection development policy. Finally, we’ll share our policy assessment and will offer tips, tricks, and just a little open access magic for other librarians seeking to develop a policy of their own.

Speakers
avatar for Amie Freeman

Amie Freeman

Scholarly Communication Librarian, University of South Carolina
Amie Freeman is the Scholarly Communication Librarian with the University of South Carolina Libraries' Digital Research Services department. She holds a BA in International Studies and a MLIS from the University of South Carolina. Amie oversees Scholar Commons, UofSC’s institutional... Read More →
SS

Shanna Schaffer

Collection Development Librarian, University of South Carolina


Wednesday November 6, 2019 6:20pm - 7:00pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

6:20pm

S2-08 Strategies for building inclusive collections in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM): The case of the Grand Challenges of Engineering
Diversity, inclusion and equity are key components expressed in many institutions’ mission statements. It is not enough to enroll diverse students and hire faculty and staff from diverse backgrounds, it is also necessary to have inclusive collections for learning, teaching and research. Since STEM principles and concepts are universal, what then do we mean by inclusive STEM collection? I asked five questions and gave one answer.

My first strategy is to study the Grand Challenges of Engineering which were developed by the National Academy of Engineering in 2008 with updates every year. The purpose of the Challenges was to raise public awareness, especially among young people of some of the biggest global issues of our time and the roles that engineers and engineering must play in addressing them (NAE, 2008). They identified fourteen broad areas which include providing access to clean water, making solar energy economical, advancing health informatics, engineering better medicines, and preventing nuclear terror. In order to achieve its purpose, students, faculty and researchers must have relevant resources in the collection. Therefore, publishers must publish in the fourteen broad areas of the challenges and librarians must enrich their collections with the same. The challenges are not only for the United States, they are global. Since their development in 2008, the challenges have received little attention from STEM librarians and publishers alike. This poster is to create an awareness among librarians and publishers of the potential nature of the grand challenges in adding diversity to STEM collections.

To begin, the approval plan profile must be rewritten to make sure that opportunities created by the Grand Challenges are well represented in the profile, particularly in the non- subject parameters such as geographical specifications, globalization, and interdisciplinary studies that involve developing countries, LGBTQ+, and Native American Studies for example.The same strategy is applied in selecting titles for purchase with firm order funds.

Who will benefit from the display: STEM collection librarians, liaisons, new engineering librarians, publishers will all learn from this poster presentation

Speakers
avatar for Ibironke Lawal

Ibironke Lawal

Science and Engineering Collections Librarian, Virginia Commonwealth University
I have been at VCU for over a decade as collections librarian and liaison to the School of Engineering and science departments in the College of Humanities and Sciences. Developing and maintaining relevant collections, providing effective service to students, moving them toward academic... Read More →


Wednesday November 6, 2019 6:20pm - 7:00pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

6:20pm

S2-09 Graphic Medicine for All
Graphic Medicine refers to any comic or graphic novel that aids in healthcare communication—be they from the medical professional or patient’s perspective. Whatever your stance is on the healthcare debate, one thing is clear, we need better communication and greater engagement around the issue of health literacy. Unfortunately, many people continue to have negative stereotypes about comics and their dependability in areas of serious study. Last year at Tufts University’s Hirsh Health Sciences Library, I created a Graphic Medicine section and we have received nothing but positive feedback from our patrons. Medical professionals, patients, health advocates, educators, and librarians have begun encouraging the use of comics in healthcare. This presentation will provide you with the history of the collection, its benefits for your community, general overview of the titles and topics covered, and show you how it would behoove any library, public or academic, to create and promote a Graphic Medicine collection for the exchange and education of all health-related issues.

Speakers
avatar for Siamak  Samiean

Siamak Samiean

Collections Management Assistant, Tufts University Hirsh Health Sciences Library


Wednesday November 6, 2019 6:20pm - 7:00pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

6:20pm

S2-10 Purchasing Power: Assessing Library Print Vendors
This project assessed the performance of two of the print suppliers for the University of North Texas Libraries: a major library book vendor and a large online retailer. The two measures used to gauge performance were (1) turn-around time to fulfill orders and (2) discount off list price as found on the library book vendor's website. During the data collection period, we ordered the least expensive print book that was in stock at either of the vendors included in the assessment and recorded the ordering information. Following the data collection period, we analyzed the results and made a final recommendation for the ordering unit's preference regarding print suppliers. The goal of this session is to provide a model for other libraries to assess the performance of their print vendors.

Speakers
avatar for Jill Dawson

Jill Dawson

Electronic Resources Librarian, University of North Texas


Wednesday November 6, 2019 6:20pm - 7:00pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

6:20pm

S2-11 Parallel or Together?: Deduplicating a STEM research collection combined from two different sources (academic and government)
The Wolbach Library serves two institutions at the Center for Astrophysics (CfA) in Cambridge, Massachusetts: the Harvard College Observatory and the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. This unique bureaucratic setup has had an effect on library collection policy, as it was common practice for decades to acquire both a Harvard and Smithsonian copy of monographs, or even full runs of serials. Recent space constraints and changes in patron needs required a reevaluation of library usage; all the circulating collection would need to fit into a quarter of its original space to make room for study areas and offices. On top of that, no one had done a proper shelf read of the print collection since 1998, so any evaluation of our holdings would have to be done from scratch.

Given the nature of the Wolbach’s longtime parallel collections, the natural first step was deduplication. While it could not create the necessary shelf space by itself, deduplication established a workflow for the most important aspects of weeding: shelf reading, condition evaluation, deaccessioning, and processing for shipment. Starting with deduplication before making a full pass also served to tamp down anxiety among our patron community regarding the withdrawal of thousands of books from the shelves. We were able to clearly communicate the deselection criteria that will ultimately be applied to the entire collection, while guaranteeing that no title was being completely removed. Ultimately the most valuable part of the deduplication exercise was a renewed conversation about the future and value of our print collection in a modern research environment.

Speakers
EB

Eric Brownell

Acquisitions Librarian, John G. Wolbach Library, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics


Wednesday November 6, 2019 6:20pm - 7:00pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

6:20pm

S2-13 What Do Editors Want?: Assessing a Growing Library Publishing Program and Finding Creative Solutions to Unmet Needs
The University of Rhode Island University Libraries publishes six open access, peer-reviewed scholarly journals on our DigitalCommons@URI platform. Our journal publishing program has grown slowly over the last decade, with new services added incrementally as needed. We decided it was time that we assess our journal publishing efforts — to ask editors to identify the successes, challenges, and unmet needs that they’ve encountered in the publishing process. We also wanted to learn from our editors what resources they had found to support their journals outside of library offerings. In early 2019, we conducted three focus group interviews with nine editors and assistants representing all of the journals on our platform. Editors were very enthusiastic about the chance to speak with us and to connect to each other. In this poster session, we will highlight what we learned from our editors… what they value, what they need, and what they want from library publishing services. We’ll also outline our plans going forward to facilitate ongoing conversations among editors and to find creative solutions to help them with their biggest challenges.

Speakers
avatar for Julia Lovett

Julia Lovett

Digital Initiatives Librarian, University of Rhode Island
Julia Lovett is currently Digital Initiatives Librarian at the University of Rhode Island, where she manages digital projects and scholarly communications initiatives, including the URI Open Access Policy. Prior to URI, she served as Special Projects Librarian at the University of... Read More →
AR

Andrée Rathemacher

Head, Acquisitions, University of Rhode Island
Andrée Rathemacher is Head of Acquisitions at the University of Rhode Island, where she administers the materials budget and is responsible for the purchase and licensing of library materials in all formats and the management of electronic resources. She is currently the co-Chair... Read More →


Wednesday November 6, 2019 6:20pm - 7:00pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

6:20pm

S2-14 “What Can I Do About Web Accessibility?” A 15 Minute Activity for Your Team’s Agency
Contributors to the poster who are unable to attend:
  • Bill Helman, Information Technology Librarian, Towson University
  • Elizabeth DeCoster, Research and Instruction Librarian, Towson University

What if 15 minutes can help your team better identify what is within their control, and influence when it comes to digital accessibility? To encourage a culture of ownership and self-efficacy around this topic and help library staff consider web accessibility in their daily work, Towson University Library’s Web Accessibility Work Group led a presentation and activity in an all staff meeting – you can too, in as little as 15 minutes. The poster will share our activity, including our slides, procedure, and materials.

Library staff were asked to place relevant tasks (on sticky notes) into areas on a target where they had different levels of control, contribution and influence. The group then collected this data and analyzed it. By doing this, we were able to identify areas of strength and areas for improvement for the library and areas for additional training or assistance for staff.

Our Library’s goal is to provide support in adopting new practices and modifying existing ones to help all members of the University community be able to better use the services and resources we have to offer – regardless of (dis)ability. This opportunity isn’t limited to just a handful of people in the library, but can be shared by everyone. From those of us who write content for the website and research guides, to those of us who talk to vendors, scan documents, write policy, or help patrons at a service desk, every one of us can contribute.

Because each of us can do a little bit to help, we advocate a proactive and incremental approach, which also recognizes that the work must be done in small manageable steps. This task helps to expose the talents, skills, and agency that each library staff member can contribute to the process of making our library truly accessible to everyone.

Speakers
avatar for Julia Caffrey

Julia Caffrey

Web Services Librarian, Towson University
RP

Robert Pleshar

Library Associate for Electronic Resources, Towson University


Wednesday November 6, 2019 6:20pm - 7:00pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

6:20pm

S2-15 Migrating to Alma without an Acquisitions staff: evolving acquisitions and electronic resource workflows from their legacy silos
When the decision was made to migrate to Alma integrated library system, Rowan University libraries had an acquisitions department and a moderate understanding of how this migration would occur. With the official announcement of the migration to Alma, the entire acquisitions team announced their retirement shortly thereafter. While Alma provided the library with an opportunity to reevaluate workflows and collaborations this was a curveball that no one was expecting.

Additionally, many resources were not traditionally tracked in Voyager, the previous library management system but tracked in Intota the previous electronic resource management system. However, these resources would now be tracked in Alma for a variety of reasons. This added another layer of complication to the retirements that occurred and the implementation that was well underway.

This presentation will discuss how Rowan University Libraries has managed the Alma migration
without the historical institutional memory of the former acquisitions team. It will also examine how the libraries have examined workflows anew as a result of both the migration and these vacancies, and how Rowan University Library has taken advantage of these expanding opportunities since the beginning of the migration until and through the go-live date to account for these new integrations.

Speakers
avatar for Christine Davidian

Christine Davidian

Eresources & Serials Librarian, Rowan University
avatar for Jennifer Matthews

Jennifer Matthews

Collection Strategy Librarian, Rowan University


Wednesday November 6, 2019 6:20pm - 7:00pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

6:20pm

S2-16 Who posts what where?: STEM Preprint Servers
A preprint is a version of a manuscript shared publicly before undergoing peer review, allowing other scientists to see and discuss findings immediately. The number of preprints submitted to preprint servers in STEM fields, such as arXiv and bioRxiv, has been steadily rising. Newer preprint servers have recently emerged in Chemistry (ChemRxiv) and Medicine (medRxiv). Journal publishers are increasing their acceptance of and support of preprints, such as by allowing direct submissions of manuscripts to journals from preprint servers, in some cases. Coinciding with this trend, researchers at Clemson University are increasingly submitting to preprint servers. This poster will present an analysis of Clemson University’s submissions to the preprint servers arXiv and bioRxiv. This will include data on the authors’ disciplines, which preprint servers they’ve chosen to submit to and how often, and what percentage of Clemson’s preprint submissions to arXiv and bioRxiv have led to peer reviewed, scholarly journal publications. This analysis will impact bibliographic instruction in STEM fields. As more researchers support the use of preprints, and as more quality data appears early in preprints, graduate students and advanced undergraduate students conducting research must be knowledgeable of preprints and know which preprint servers to search to stay up to date in their fields. Librarians should consider discussing the challenges and benefits of preprints, and demonstrating the use of preprint servers, to these students in STEM library instruction workshops.

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Groff

Jennifer Groff

Science Librarian, Clemson University
Reference, instruction, outreach, and collection development in the sciences.


Wednesday November 6, 2019 6:20pm - 7:00pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

6:20pm

S2-17 E-Books and Textbook Affordability: Let’s Talk About It
The high cost of college textbooks has been a much discussed issue in recent years, and with good reason. Expensive books are not just a financial burden on students. Studies have shown that prohibitive textbook pricing leads to lower grades, increased course withdrawals, and increased time to degree. One major response to this crisis has been the promotion of open educational resources (OER), and the efforts in this area have produced promising results. However, there are still drawbacks to OER, such as faculty reluctance to adopt material over concerns about quality.

A different, perhaps complementary, approach to the textbook pricing problem is to increase the use of library-owned electronic textbooks. E-books, of course, are now commonplace in academic library collections, and most libraries already own some e-textbooks. But what if librarians took a more active role in acquiring these resources? Could this help alleviate the textbook cost problem?

To answer these questions and others, we first needed to learn what books the professors were adopting for use in their courses. However, soliciting professors for this information proved to be difficult, so we initiated a more proactive approach. We started identifying potential e-book purchases by reviewing the required textbooks for social science courses. Although we were disappointed to find that only 18% were available in a suitable electronic format, we still believe e-books can play an important role in providing textbooks for students. Many academic libraries have come to realize there is no “one size fits all” solution to textbook affordability, and there may be advantages to addressing the problem through multiple approaches.

Our presentation provides narrative background and updates to our recent study on e-book availability. We will explore how e-books have been overlooked as a solution and what librarians can do to market this option to faculty.

Speakers
avatar for Rachel Cooke

Rachel Cooke

Education and Arts Librarian, Florida Gulf Coast University
Rachel Cooke is the Art and Education Librarian at FGCU and serves on the ACRL PRIMO Committee and the FACRL Board. She is a Choice reviewer and has published numerous articles about academic libraries in College & Research Libraries, The Reference Librarian, Journal of Library... Read More →
avatar for Steve Rokusek

Steve Rokusek

Social Sciences Librarian, Florida Gulf Coast University


Wednesday November 6, 2019 6:20pm - 7:00pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

6:20pm

S2-18 Collaborative Archive and Data Research Environment (CADRE): A Big Data Solution for Research Libraries
Many libraries are struggling with meeting the needs of their researchers for access to proprietary and open datasets as well as overcoming the challenges related to infrastructure, licensing, archival storage, and technical expertise. One solution is CADRE. This IMLS-funded cloud-based platform makes licensed and open big datasets accessible in multiple ways including an API and a graphical user interface while offering proper authentication, security, stewardship, and storage. By distributing costs across multiple academic libraries, CADRE is able to provide an enhanced environment and user experience at a substantially reduced cost. In addition, a free tier of basic services is available for smaller institutions and the public.

The CADRE platform is currently populated with Web of Science XML data, Microsoft Academic Graph bibliometric data and US Patent data, but other datasets will be introduced to the platform as access rights are obtained and researchers make their needs known. Publishers and others may consider CADRE an attractive option to deposit their datasets in an agnostic text mining environment accessible only to authorized users.

The project is led by Indiana University Libraries in conjunction with the Indiana University Network Science Institute, the Pervasive Technology Institute, and the Big Ten Academic Alliance. Early developmental partners include corporate, non-profit, and academic institutions including: The Web of Science Group, Microsoft Research, Jetstream, University of Iowa, University of Michigan, Michigan State University, University of Minnesota, Ohio State University, Penn State University, Purdue University, Rutgers University, the Midwest Big Data Hub, the South Big Data Hub, and the West Big Data Hub.

Attendees will gain a better understanding of the advantages and capabilities of CADRE and how their libraries, researchers, and publishing companies can benefit by becoming partners in this collaborative big data project.

Speakers
avatar for Robert Van Rennes

Robert Van Rennes

Associate Director, Library Initiatives, Big Ten Academic Alliance


Wednesday November 6, 2019 6:20pm - 7:00pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

6:20pm

S2-19 The Need for Systems Technology Training in Library Schools: Are We Adequately Training Future Librarians?
A survey of the literature shows that very few library schools are offering practical instruction in managing the types of computer systems used in libraries. Emphasis is placed on how to use library catalogs, databases, and discovery systems, but very little training is provided on how to implement and manage such systems. Research will be presented on what skills are needed to fill a systems librarian role, ideas on how library schools can provide the training needed for students interested in this role, and strategies for marketing to potential undergraduates with technical skill sets.

By interacting with interested attendees at the poster session, I hope to get feedback on my ideas for better training of library school students in order to enhance a future article on this subject. I would like to broaden my perspective on this topic through this poster presentation.

Speakers
DD

Debbi Dinkins

Associate Dean, Library, Stetson University
Dinkins is the Associate Dean of the Library, working closely with the Library Dean on issues of administration and planning. She is responsible for the management of the library’s materials budgets and operating budgets. She oversees the acquisition and cataloging of the library’s... Read More →



Wednesday November 6, 2019 6:20pm - 7:00pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

6:20pm

S2-20 Sometimes two hats are better than one: Finding synergy between collections and liaison work
At the Gerstein Science Information Centre at the University of Toronto, collections work for all health science subjects has historically been the responsibility of a single liaison librarian. In December 2018, a new approach was implemented where two librarians share collections work for all health science subjects, while also supporting their own individual liaison portfolios. As the two new librarians hired into these positions, we initially had difficulty seeing the connection between what we felt were two distinct, unrelated roles. This poster will discuss how a project to investigate a new systematic review screening software challenged that perspective. Through the project, we were able to leverage the unique strengths of each role while learning to see and appreciate the intersection between them. In sharing our experiences, we hope to encourage continued conversation about the challenges and opportunities of split roles, and open the discussion with others who are working to balance collections work with additional responsibilities.

Speakers
GB

Glyneva Bradley-Ridout

Liaison & Education Librarian, Gerstein Science Information Centre - University of Toronto
MG

Mikaela Gray

Liaison & Education Librarian, Gerstein Science Information Centre - University of Toronto


Wednesday November 6, 2019 6:20pm - 7:00pm
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

7:00pm

Annual Conference Reception, sponsored by Elsevier
Please wear or bring your conference name badge for admission.

Charleston is well known for its hospitality, and the Annual Reception is a true Charleston affair! The reception will be held at the South Carolina Aquarium. Be entertained by an intimate look at many of South Carolina’s native animals and plants as your journey through the Aquarium takes you from the mountains to the sea. You’ll encounter surprises around every corner and an experience straight from the island of Madagascar is closer than you imagine. The Shark Shallows 20,000 gallon touch tank exhibit will also be open to attendees.

Delicious lowcountry specialties, as well as more familiar reception fare, will be served. Beer, wine, and soft drinks provided at the bar. Live musical entertainment by The Soulfeathers. We'll also have a photo booth to take souvenir photos with fun props.

Shuttle transportation will be provided. Pick up one of the shuttles at any conference location and let the driver know you wish to attend the reception at the aquarium. We can't wait to see you there!

Sponsors
avatar for Elsevier

Elsevier

Elsevier is a global information analytics business that helps institutions and professionals advance healthcare, open science and improve performance for the benefit of humanity.  Elsevier publishes over 2,500 digitized journals, including The Lancet and Cell, more than 38,000 e-book... Read More →


Wednesday November 6, 2019 7:00pm - 9:00pm
SC Aquarium 100 Aquarium Wharf, Charleston, SC 29401
 
Thursday, November 7
 

7:00am

Registration Check-In
PLEASE NOTE: Location is in the Upper Lobby of the Francis Marion Hotel. Conference registration is NOT AVAILABLE at the Gaillard Center. Vendor badges for booth will be located in your packet on your assigned table for the vendor showcase.

Check in upon arrival to receive your conference badge and attendee materials. Conference badges will be required for entry into conference venues, the reception, and conference shuttles.
The desk will be open the following hours:

Monday, 11/4, 7:00 am - 7:00 pm
Tuesday, 11/5, 7:00 am – 7:00 pm
Wednesday, 11/6, 7:00 am – 7:00 pm
Thursday, 11/7, 7:00 am – 6:00 pm
Friday, 11/8: CLOSED (All registration materials will be moved to the Information Desk on the Mezzanine Level of the Francis Marion Hotel)

Thursday November 7, 2019 7:00am - 7:00pm
Upper Lobby, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

7:30am

Continental Breakfast
Join us for a light breakfast prior to the morning plenary sessions.

Sponsors
avatar for ATG Media

ATG Media

ATG Media is the group that includes the Charleston Conference, Against the Grain, a series of short, open access e-books titled "Charleston Briefings: Trending Topics for Information Professionals", and the "Charleston Voices" monograph series.  ATG Media is a wholly owned subsidiary... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2019 7:30am - 8:30am
Outside Grand Ballroom, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

8:30am

Opening Remarks
Thursday November 7, 2019 8:30am - 8:35am
Performance Hall, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

8:35am

Keynote Plenary: Collaborating to Support the Research Community: The Next Chapter
As a newcomer Kumsal Bayazit will share her observations about the dynamic world of Research including its evolving needs, challenges, and diversity of views on how to progress. She will look forward to the future, exploring the possibilities to support Research communities collaboratively as they work on solving Grand Challenges to advance society.

Moderators
avatar for Cris Ferguson

Cris Ferguson

Assistant Dean of Libraries / Associate Professor, Murray State University

Speakers
avatar for Kumsal Bayazit

Kumsal Bayazit

CEO, Elsevier
Kumsal Bayazit was appointed Chief Executive Officer of Elsevier in February 2019. She has held multiple positions with RELX since 2004, most recently as Regional President Europe, Middle East and Africa at Reed Exhibitions. Before joining Reed Exhibitions in 2016, Kumsal was RELX... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2019 8:35am - 9:15am
Performance Hall, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

9:15am

Vicky Speck ABC Clio Leadership Award Presentation
The Vicky Speck ABC Clio Leadership Award is given every year to a leader in the Charleston Conference who has made a lasting contribution to the Conference's mission. The award has been granted annually since 2006. Past recipients include: Anthony Watkinson (2006), Jack Montgomery (2007), Beth Bernhardt (2008), Heather Miller (2009), Eleanor Cook (2010), Glenda Alvin (2011), Ramune Kubilius (2012), Audrey Powers (2013), Leah Hinds (2014), Tony Horava (2015), Chuck Hamaker (2016), Judy Luther (2017), and Erin Gallagher (2018).

Thursday November 7, 2019 9:15am - 9:20am
Performance Hall, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

9:30am

A New Sense of Campus Privacy? Are Libraries Out of Step?
Expectations and practices of privacy have changed dramatically in the space of less than a generation. Our phones broadcast our whereabouts. Biometrics confirm our identities and hint at ancestries to be discovered. We routinely trade personal information for personalization. Yet librarians have stood firmly upon strong principles of patron privacy. Is this conservatism justified, or have libraries lost touch with the modern culture? What opportunities might be lost to improve and tailor user experience, to contribute to student success via learning analytics, or to strategically leverage advanced data analytics? How might we across the library and information industry need to rethink our relationships with one another and with end users, as well as what privacy, data literacy, and consent even mean in a networked and surveillance society? Join us to explore new perspectives and new issues around privacy in our field.

Moderators
avatar for Heather Staines

Heather Staines

Director Business Development, MIT Knowledge Futures Group

Speakers
avatar for Darby Orcutt

Darby Orcutt

Assistant Head, Collections & Research Strategy, NC State University Libraries
I am a librarian, teacher, researcher, and leader deeply interested and involved in interdisciplinary and computational research, the future of higher ed, and cultural aspects of digital transformation.Assistant Head, Collections & Research Strategy, NC State University LibrariesFaculty... Read More →
avatar for Doreen Bradley

Doreen Bradley

Director of Learning Programs and Initiatives, University of Michigan Library
I have a passion for learning and helping students and faculty to become great researchers. I lead the Learning Programs & Initiatives group within the University Library and represent the library on campus instruction initiatives. In these efforts, I work collaboratively with library... Read More →
avatar for Tim Lloyd

Tim Lloyd

CEO, LibLynx
I specialize in Identity, Access, and Analytics for online resources. My business, LibLynx, provides cloud-based solutions to publishers and libraries to help them manage authentication and authorization, and to better understand usage of their resources. I'm a member of the governance... Read More →



Thursday November 7, 2019 9:30am - 10:15am
Grand Ballroom 2, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

9:30am

The Time Has Come to Talk of Library and Museum Collaborations
Libraries and Museums: Perfect Together!

Description: In this talk, Dawes, who oversees the libraries and museums at his institution, will explore the benefits and pitfalls of the type of organizational structure he created, as well as the potential impact for the broader community.

Making it Last Longer: Archives, Museums, and Libraries

Description: Libraries, Archives, and Museums (LAMs) serve a vital role in preserving, educating, and interpreting history for future generations. In this presentation, Haykal will discuss projects undertaken by the presenter as well as projects undertaken by the information professional community that aim to bring communities into projects. Additional discussion will examine why these institutions should collaborate.

Moderators
avatar for Glenda Alvin

Glenda Alvin

Associate Professor, Assistant Director for Collection Management and Administration Head, Acquisitions and Serials, Library, Tennessee State University

Speakers
AH

Aaisha Haykal

Manager of Archival Services, Avery Center for African American Culture and History, College of Charleston
Aaisha N. Haykal is the manager of archival services at the College of Charleston’s Avery Research Center for African American History and Culture. In this position, she is responsible for collection development, public programming, instruction, reference, and administrative duties... Read More →
avatar for Trevor A. Dawes

Trevor A. Dawes

Vice Provost for Libraries and Museums and May Morris University Librarian, University of Delaware Library
I am an experienced librarian and educator.



Thursday November 7, 2019 9:30am - 10:15am
Grand Ballroom 1, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

10:15am

Refreshment Break
Thursday November 7, 2019 10:15am - 10:45am
Outside Grand Ballroom, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

10:45am

Communicating Collections: Strategies for informing library stakeholders of collections budget & management decisions
A challenging aspect of the collection management process is effectively communicating with stakeholders about library resources. Communication can range from obtaining patron feedback integral in collection planning to effective messaging elaborating on collection budgets and cancellation decisions. It has also become increasingly necessary to explain the various acquisition models that affect the landscape of library content and use of electronic resources. In this session, the University of South Florida will present the results of a survey of the approaches used in academic library websites to communicate collection policies along with related considerations, statistics and data, justifications, and factors affecting selection practices. Information about the important elements used to construct a dialog with faculty and administration in order to demonstrate the costs and value of library resources to those in the academic community is included.This session will also present a case study demonstrating the practical implementation of these communication principles. The study will show how Mines Library was able to break free from a cycle of collection stagnation, which was perpetuated by a lack of effective communication. The result was that the Mines Library was able to tell a story with data in order to communicate a message, as well as strengthen their partnerships with faculty regarding collection management.Session attendees will acquire information on the scope of methods used to communicate with stakeholders and elements of effective messaging regarding library collection management.

Speakers
JA

John Abresch

Coordinator of Collections, University of South Florida
John Abresch is an Acquisitions/Collections Librarian in the Academic Resources Department at University of South Florida Library. John’s professional responsibilities are with acquisitions functions as well as engaging in collection planning activities. His research interests... Read More →
LP

Laura Pascual

Interim Director, Collections & Discovery, University of South Florida
avatar for Anna Seiffert

Anna Seiffert

Head of Collection Management Services, Colorado School of Mines
Anna Seiffert is the Electronic Resources & Collection Assessment Librarian as well as the Head of Collection Management Services at Arthur Lakes Library. She joined the Mines faculty in 2016 where she has worked on assessment, collection development & management, and the eResource... Read More →



Thursday November 7, 2019 10:45am - 11:25am
Grand Ballroom 1, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

10:45am

Hire Ed: How Libraries Can Do Their Part to Help New College Graduates Become Employable A Discussion with Employers, Students and Librarians
Sometimes, having a degree isn’t enough. Today’s college graduates are expected to enter the workforce with technical skills on par with those who’ve been in the job market for years. To prepare their students for employment, many universities are relying more and more on their libraries to help develop those skills.
Learn how academic libraries can play a major part in the curriculum that ensures their students are competitive once they enter the job market. In this panel discussion, you’ll hear from:

• Employers on what skills they look for in new graduates
• College students on what technical skills they’re learning at their universities, how they use the library, and what resources they need to be more prepared for the workforce
• Academic librarians on innovative ways they provide a variety of content for research and learning

Come prepared with your questions for this lively panel, and come away with a better understanding of how your library can support existing curriculum that ensures students are more likely to be hired upon graduation.

Speakers
avatar for Kate Hill

Kate Hill

Library Services Engineer, EBSCO
RJ

Radhi Jagirdar

Product Marketing Manager, ProQuest
avatar for Jerry Roche

Jerry Roche

VP Customer Success, O'Reilly Media
I lead O'Reilly's Customer Success organization where we empower our corporate and academic customers to achieve their learning goals. I'd like to hear from you about how your library is preparing students for employment; the curriculum being used to ensure students are competitive... Read More →
avatar for Nasser Saleh

Nasser Saleh

Head, Engineering and Science Library,, Queen's University


Thursday November 7, 2019 10:45am - 11:25am
Calhoun Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

10:45am

A Comparison and Review of 17 E-book platforms
The University of Michigan Press, with support from the Mellon Foundation, asked John Lavender, of Lavender Consulting, to conduct a review of the ACLS Humanities E-book (HEB) following its launch on Michigan’s new Fulcrum platform. ACLS-HEB is an online collection of over 5,400 books of high quality in the humanities from over 100 publishers. It was felt that now the market for E-books had matured, part of the review should be a comparative study of E-book platforms run by publishers, university presses and e-book vendors, 17 platforms were selected. The review studied the key features offered by each platform, how they handled searching, content delivery, displaying results, ability to view and download and other key features, there was no attempt to judge the value of the content. Following this review, Michigan Press felt that it would be beneficial to share the results with the wider community. As well as being of interest to publishers, the review will also be relevant for librarians making purchasing decisions and vendors selling e-book services.

The platforms reviewed were:
JSTOR, EBSCO host eBook academic collection, ProQuest eBook central, De Gruyter online books, Oxford University Press Scholarship Online, Cambridge Core Books Online, Taylor & Francis eBooks, Springer Link, Project MUSE, Bloomsbury Collections, Manchester Hive/Manchester Open Hive, SAGE Knowledge, Brill eBooks, Wiley Online Library, Elsevier Science Direct, Emerald Insight, ACLS - HEB.

In addition to synthesizing the results of this review, our session will explore librarian perspectives on E-book assessment criteria. Attributes such as accessibility compliance, library branding, and DRM will be discussed in relation to library collections and decision-making.

Speakers
avatar for John Lavender

John Lavender

Consultant, Lavender Consulting
Lavender-Consulting is run by John Lavender, a publisher with almost 40 years' experience in academic and scientific publishing. John has worked with books, databases and journals, and in editorial, sales, marketing, electronic content and delivery, business development and in negotiating... Read More →
avatar for Courtney McAllister

Courtney McAllister

Library Services Engineer, EBSCO Information Services



Thursday November 7, 2019 10:45am - 11:25am
Grand Ballroom 2, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

10:45am

AI, VR and Other Interactive Content: How Libraries and Classrooms are Using Emerging Tech to Advance Knowledge
New technologies are quickly gaining popularity in libraries and education, specifically AI and virtual reality. Adoption of these new technologies in libraries, classrooms and curricula requires planning and resources, including related resources like content development, faculty development, instructional design assistance, learning space integration, policy, ethics and access equity. Hear how three different libraries are working to integrate these technologies into library space, course curriculum and education.  Speakers will provide examples on implementing AR/VR resources at their libraries and demonstrate a variety of exciting AR/VR technologies, as well as provide insights into how these innovative content types and technologies are designed to advance education, academic and educational programs. This interactive session will allow for audience participants to share their experiences and ask questions of presenters.  Come ready to share ideas and learn more about these exciting technologies!

Speakers
DB

Douglas Ballman

Manager of External Relations - Online Archive, USC Shoah Foundation - The Institute for Visual History and Education
DH

Dan Hawkins

Academic Technology Librarian, Daniel Library, The Citadel
avatar for Jolanda-Pieta (Joey) van Arnhem

Jolanda-Pieta (Joey) van Arnhem

Scholars Studio Librarian, College of Charleston Libraries
Jolanda-Pieta (Joey) van Arnhem is an artist and educator with 20+ years of experience in technology and 12+ years in libraries and education. She is responsible for researching emergent technologies and advising the library on best strategies for adoption. Joey contributes her expertise... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2019 10:45am - 11:25am
Salon II, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

10:45am

From Rural Publics to Urban Universities: Implementing Discovery at a Statewide Level
In January 2018, NC LIVE, a consortium of 205 North Carolina member libraries, began partnering with ProQuest/ Ex Libris to offer the Summon discovery solution to its members. At the time, many of NC LIVE’s libraries did not have an existing discovery service and this opportunity gave them the chance to implement a discovery service at no additional cost. By implementing Summon with NC LIVE, libraries were able to take advantage of existing consortial relationships for shared print and electronic resources in an implementation process that was streamlined for NC LIVE. NC LIVE is a multi-type library consortium with public libraries and academic libraries of many different sizes, and a wide range of technical skill sets. Ex Libris and NC LIVE designed the implementation process and follow-up support plan to meet the diverse needs of NC LIVE libraries. The objective of this session is to detail the benefits and challenges of a statewide implementation of a discovery system with a wide range of libraries.

Attendees can expect to learn how a discovery system can be an effective solution for academic, community college and public libraries alike; how to manage implementation on a large scale for a diverse group of libraries with a range of technical abilities; how to support adoption in libraries that are struggling with an implementation process; and how to build a library community of support for a shared system within a statewide consortium. During the session, we’ll hear from an NC LIVE community college library about their experiences with the shared implementation process. We’ll informally poll the audience to gather feedback on their experiences and open it up for discussion at the end of the session.

Speakers
avatar for Claire Leverett

Claire Leverett

Assistant Director, NC LIVE
avatar for Stephen Gilewski

Stephen Gilewski

Solutions Architect, Ex Libris
I work with librarians to improve workflows and the end-user experience. Ask me about discovery - Summon or Primo, or the benefits of unified resource management with Alma and Leganto!
avatar for Stephen Brooks

Stephen Brooks

Reference Librarian, Durham Technical Community College
Stephen Brooks has been a reference librarian at Durham Tech since 2014. This is his ninth Charleston Conference and first since 2013. Beginning as an undergraduate student, he has worked in college and university libraries since 1989. He earned his MLIS from UNC Greensboro in 2003.He'd... Read More →



Thursday November 7, 2019 10:45am - 11:25am
Magnolia Room, Courtyard Marriott Hotel 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

10:45am

Resources for Online Science Courses: How Librarians and Faculty Connect
This panel session will address the challenges that librarians and faculty face when supporting online Science courses or curriculum with relevant resources. The scope of the discussion will include selection, collection, outreach and evaluation processes. A science librarian who works with both on-campus and online programs as well as a member of the teaching faculty will provide their insights. Both will share some concrete results of their activities.

In addition, we will hear the perspective of a librarian with wider collection development responsibilities helping us learning about how this piece fits into the whole.

Interactions with online science courses in Nursing, Biology and Chemistry will serve as examples. Quantitative data will be part of this session. We also plan to ask for questions in advance and at the beginning of the session to add to the conversation which follows each panelist’s short presentation.

Speakers
avatar for Mary Poffenroth

Mary Poffenroth

STEM Faculty & Salzburg Global Fellow, San Jose State University
I am a biology lecturer and speak on the intersection of fear science, story, and personal success. My TEDx, recorded in London in May, called The Myth of Fearlessness should be out in late August.
avatar for Rachelle McLain

Rachelle McLain

Collection Development Librarian, Montana State University
avatar for Brian Ryckman

Brian Ryckman

STEM Librarian, Southern New Hampshire University
Brian describes his start in the profession as an accidental distance librarian after inheriting the off-campus library instruction responsibilities one week into his first professional position. His interests include effective teaching practices, scholarly communication, project-based... Read More →
NW

Nathan Welch

Director, JoVE


Thursday November 7, 2019 10:45am - 11:25am
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott Hotel 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

10:45am

Six impossible things: Moving KBART into the next decade
KBART is one of the most successful NISO recommendations today. Formally supported by over 80 organizations across all stakeholder groups, it enables a standardized transfer of data between content providers and knowledge bases. Most recently KBART added an automated process to transfer holdings data to localize an institution's knowledge base holdings. While KBART was originally built to focus on journal and book data, the world has moved on--the different flavors and nuances of open access, the increased use of audiovisual material, holdings at the chapter and article levels, and issues around translations, transliterations, and author names are just some of the challenges that are disrupting the flow. So what is next for KBART? How does it adapt to continue to solve the data flow problems that libraries, publishers, and knowledge base providers face today? The presenters in this session are all members of the NISO KBART Standing Committee and/or the KBART Automation Working Group. They will discuss the status and future of a "Phase 3" revision of NISO KBART that aims not only to clarify the existing recommendations but also to expand them to address the new challenges, including the support of additional content types beyond serials and monographs and improvements to item-level discovery and access. During the session, we will raise discussion points and encourage candid interactions, where the audience can contribute their ideas and concerns to keep the ball rolling into 2020 and well beyond.

Speakers
avatar for Christine Stohn

Christine Stohn

Director Product Management, Ex Libris, a ProQuest Company
Christine Stohn is director of product management for discovery and delivery at Ex Libris. Christine has over 25 years of experience in the library and information industry, having worked on the content and data side before joining Ex Libris in 2001. In her current role Christine... Read More →
avatar for Robert Heaton

Robert Heaton

Collection Management Librarian, Utah State University
Looking for answers: How will we keep paying for all this stuff? How are we going to archive all this digital stuff? How can we align author incentives, the publishing marketplace, and the future of the scholarly record? When will libraries benefit from well-designed free software... Read More →
AR

Andrée Rathemacher

Head, Acquisitions, University of Rhode Island
Andrée Rathemacher is Head of Acquisitions at the University of Rhode Island, where she administers the materials budget and is responsible for the purchase and licensing of library materials in all formats and the management of electronic resources. She is currently the co-Chair... Read More →
avatar for Noah Levin

Noah Levin

Co-Chair NISO KBART Standing Committee, Independent Professional
Noah Levin is the Co-Chair of the NISO KBART Standing Committee and a member of the KBART Automation Working Group. Noah has spent the last 19 years designing and creating metadata workflows for large Academic and Trade Publishers; managing their Link Resolver/Discovery data, MARC... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2019 10:45am - 11:25am
Gold Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

10:45am

Something to Talk About: the Intersection of Library Assessment and Collection Diversity
The time has come for academic libraries to fully embrace a commitment to equity, diversity, and inclusivity (EDI) in their collections. As we modify our acquisition practices to develop diverse and inclusive collections and to meet the goals of EDI initiatives, we must concurrently develop assessment methods to evaluate our collections in relation to those initiatives. The presenters will showcase two ongoing projects from the intersection of library assessment and collection diversity:Tim Morton will outline a framework that the University of Virginia Library has developed to evaluate our global collections. This framework is inspired by the #ownvoices hashtag, which has been embraced by public libraries seeking to provide diverse works by diverse authors in their collections. In addition to discussing the origins of this framework, we will also present our findings from applying it UVA’s African Studies collection. We will also discuss the limitations of this framework and will offer the chance for discussion on adapting, improving, and reusing this framework in other institutions and for other global collections.Roxanne Backowski will share an example of a campus diversity initiative assessment measure, a result of a user-centered collection assessment project in relation to EDI undertaken at a mid-size public university in the Midwest. Through quantitative and qualitative research methods, this research explores the effect of campus diversity initiatives and curriculum changes on the rate of use of library books. The findings suggest instructors are increasingly assigning content related to EDI due to campus diversity initiatives. Simultaneously, collection content related to EDI is being accessed at an increasing rate. This session aims to give attendees initial strategies for assessing not only the equity, diversity, and inclusivity of their collections, but also to place those collection efforts in the broader picture of institutional values and goals.

Speakers
TM

Timothy Morton

Manager, Resource Acquisition & Description, University of Virginia Library
RB

Roxanne Backowski

Electronic Resources Librarian, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire



Thursday November 7, 2019 10:45am - 11:25am
Grand Ballroom 3, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

10:45am

Representation of Atypical Resources in the Discovery Layer: Publisher, Discovery Service Provider, and Library Perspectives
Discovery services have been used in libraries for over 10 years, supporting integrated searching of and access to full text, subject indexes, and a library’s collection. In this session, panelists, representing different perspectives, will discuss the representation of atypical resources – meaning content other than primarily article- or chapter-based journal, book, or full-text collections – in the discovery layer. Atypical resources provide numeric data, maps, other types of visualizations, etc., as well as content housed in a library’s special collections. These types of resources present challenges for providers, participating publishers, the library, and, ultimately, for the end user searching for relevant content. The discussion will address the following topics:
  • Discoverability of atypical resources in discovery systems
  • Discoverability and the first-time user
  • Tactics for driving/promoting usage
  • Metadata elements of atypical resources vis à vis discovery systems indexes
  • Granularity of content suitable for discovery systems indexing
  • Indexing of open access atypical content in discovery services
  • NISO Open Discovery Initiative update on guidelines related to atypical resources

Attendees can expect to gain a greater understanding of the complexity of these topics and will be encouraged to raise questions and comments.

Speakers
avatar for Todd Carpenter

Todd Carpenter

Executive Director, National Information Standards Organization (NISO)
avatar for Jay Holloway

Jay Holloway

Sr. Product Manager, Delivery Services, OCLC
I focus on the end-to-end user experience – from discovery through delivery. I collaborate with librarians, developers, designers, researchers, and library patrons to build intuitive, seamless experiences within OCLC products and services. My recent focus positions the WorldCat... Read More →
BF

Brian Falato

Senior Cataloger, University of South Florida
I have been doing original cataloging of books, journals, and video (both print and electronic) for 20 years. As we have gotten more involved with e-books at my institution, I have been increasingly focusing on batch loading. I have an interest in all forms of communication and... Read More →
avatar for Jill Blaemers

Jill Blaemers

Senior Editor, Data Planet, SAGE Publishing
Talk to me about data and data literacy! I’m an MLIS with years of experience helping design and build databases that are used to support teaching and learning in higher education. At Data Planet, we aggregate statistical datasets and I develop editorial content that describes the... Read More →
avatar for Linda Kopecky

Linda Kopecky

Head, Research Services – UWM Libraries, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee
Linda is the Head of Research Services at the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, a public urban R1 research university. Linda leads initiatives to support UWM’s overall research environment through advanced library services, collections and facilities. Previously Linda was Associate... Read More →



Thursday November 7, 2019 10:45am - 11:25am
Carolina Ballroom A, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

10:45am

The Textbook Affordability Puzzle: Perspectives from 3 of the Pieces
Attend this session to learn how one library successfully leveraged its e-book collections to support textbook affordability efforts at the university. Presenters will discuss the initiative from three perspectives; an associate director, textbook affordability librarian, and an acquisitions librarian. The Associate Director will outline the history of the program and how metrics are being used to demonstrate library value from an administrative viewpoint. Included will be the genesis of the program, methodology used, and how data collected from the initiative were used to gain a new position at the university, a Textbook Affordability Librarian. The Textbook Affordability Librarian will show the various avenues developed for faculty outreach and collaboration with Subject Librarians to identify materials, as well as partnerships developed outside the library. The Acquisitions and Collection Assessment Librarian will share the final part of the model, by discussing considerations for purchasing materials for use as a course text, including DRM and budget considerations. A model and workflow describing the initiative and key contributors will be offered.

This session would be relevant to attendees as a case study in launching and sustaining a program to promote the use of e-books as textbooks through the library. The session will be structured to invite questions throughout the presentation and offer tips for libraries wishing to implement or improve current practices.

Speakers
avatar for Penny Beile

Penny Beile

Associate Director for Research, Education, and Engagement, University of Central Florida
avatar for Sara Duff

Sara Duff

Acquisitions and Collection Assessment Librarian, University of Central Florida
I'm a relatively new hire at UCF, but I previously spent 7 years as a librarian at a community college in the Florida Panhandle. I'm interested in benchmarks (or lack thereof!) for collection assessment, ways to improve collection analysis for program review/new program proposals... Read More →
avatar for Katy Miller

Katy Miller

Student Success/Textbook Affordability Librarian, University of Central Florida
As Student Success/Textbook Affordability Librarian, I'm interested in ways the library can support faculty in providing low or zero cost course materials to their students. I'm also interested in ways to support student success through partnerships between the library and student... Read More →



Thursday November 7, 2019 10:45am - 11:25am
Carolina Ballroom B, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

10:45am

Turn Left Here: Developing Roadmaps to Successful Implementation and Beyond
Every library has had their share of successful and not-so-successful initiatives. The key to navigating a successfully implemented initiative begins with a well-crafted roadmap, providing stakeholders turn-by-turn directions throughout the planning, implementation, and maintenance stages. In this moderated panel session, Rachel Fleming, Collections Initiatives Librarian at UTC; Johan Tilstra, founder of Lean Library; and Sandy Srivastava, Electronic Resources Librarian at SNHU, share their insights on designing and implementing successful roadmaps, highlighting their experiences, best practices, and lessons learned along the way.

• Charting the course. Walk with us through the roadmap-making process. This early planning stage involves project justification, securing funding, identifying stakeholders, developing key partnerships, and assessing other “road” conditions. Rachel Fleming will share the UTC Library’s approach to revving up for the roadmap process from the collection development perspective at a midsized institution, supporting new and expanding academic programs and a variety of initiatives, including affordability.

• Getting on the road. With our map close at hand, it’s time to put the plan into action. We’ll discuss how to jump-start installation, check under the hood for system readiness, and ramp up to full implementation, pinpointing factors that facilitate success. Johan Tilstra will detail how Lean Library uses upfront communication and open dialogue to collaborate with customers in an effort to ensure a smooth implementation, even when detours happen.

• Maintaining cruising speed. The time has come to transition to consistent road readiness. Keep your initiative running smoothly for the long haul by incorporating targeted training for various “drivers,” paving the way for adoption into learning technologies, and performing routine maintenance checks over time. Sandhya Srivastava will describe how the Shapiro Library merges strategic innovative services, instructional outreach, and professional development opportunities for patrons into the roadmap process to ensure the long-term success of new resource initiatives after implementation.

Speakers
SS

Sandy Srivastava

Electronic Resources Librarian, Southern New Hampshire University
Electronic Resources
avatar for Rachel Fleming

Rachel Fleming

Scholarly Communications Librarian, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
avatar for Johan Tilstra

Johan Tilstra

Founder, CEO of Lean Library, Lean Library
avatar for Rebekah Shaw

Rebekah Shaw

Market Research Analyst, SAGE Publishing



Thursday November 7, 2019 10:45am - 11:25am
Rutledge Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

10:45am

Accelerating Digital Collaboration and Engagement: Experimenting with Open Communities
Librarians are increasingly working with researchers on campus (and across campuses) to forge new initiatives around archival content, diverse stakeholder voices, and campus policies. They are also conducting research which they must share to gather stakeholder feedback. The resulting projects (and works in progress) might not fit easily or operate to their full potential on current hosting platforms or repositories due to multimedia, affiliation-restrictions, or limited feature sets. Infrastructure developed by universities for academics offers increasing flexibility to meet the needs of publications today and tomorrow, including OER creation. New tools enable attribution around a wide range of contributor roles, aligning with new ethics around labor. Learn how such communities are coming together in person and online using open source tools to maximize efficiency and impact. Librarians from Duke University and MIT will share their experiences with tools and workflows, and attendees are encouraged to tell their own stories. Through this exchange the group will develop a living resource page to share best practices and ongoing discussions. This roundtable discussion will focus on challenges and solutions to delivering sustainable platforms for new scholarly communication outputs. Attendees will learn how to advise their faculty and students in creating multi-format outputs, including multi-media and interactive elements. They will also learn about options for internal and external engagement.

Speakers
avatar for Liz Milewicz

Liz Milewicz

Digital Scholarship Services, Duke University Libraries
Project planning, management, and transitioning Internships and other experiential training in digital scholarship Building new forms of literacy (e.g., publishing) into academic courses
avatar for Catherine Ahearn

Catherine Ahearn

Content Lead, MIT Knowledge Futures Group
avatar for Heather Staines

Heather Staines

Director Business Development, MIT Knowledge Futures Group
avatar for Katharine Dunn

Katharine Dunn

Scholarly Communications Librarian, MIT Libraries


Thursday November 7, 2019 10:45am - 11:25am
Pinckney Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

10:45am

Behind the Gate: Early Career Researchers’ Motivations for Using ResearchGate
ResearchGate is a significant academic social network site for researchers to publish, share, and discover research with a wide international academic community, and is changing the landscape of scholarly communication. While there is research on which features different populations use on ResearchGate, primarily through surveys and analysis of profiles on the site, the potential motivations for joining and utilizing ResearchGate from the perspective of early career researchers (ECRs) has not been examined. This session will present findings from an interview-based study of what motivates early career researchers to engage on ResearchGate, with particular attention to those who build profiles prior to having any publications, and how it fits with their career goals. This study indicates a potential relationship between ResearchGate, scholars, and publishers as well as lessons for librarians in understanding their user communities. Publishers and librarians alike can utilize these findings to better support scholars, and understand trending topics within respective fields, creating a more relevant and supportive academic publishing and/or library service program.

Attendees at the session will leave with:

• Insights into how ECRs are interacting on ResearchGate and how they value ResearchGate to establish and further their academic career status.
• An understanding of why ECRs use ResearchGate rather than other platforms that are available to them (e.g., institutional repositories).
• A framework for considering how publisher and library service might be re-worked meet ECRs' needs.

Speakers
avatar for Lisa Hinchliffe

Lisa Hinchliffe

Professor/Coordinator for Information Literacy Services and Instruction in the University Library, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
LP

Laurel Post

Libraries & Archives Intern, Rock & Roll Hall of Fame
avatar for Morgan Sherlock

Morgan Sherlock

Graduate Assistant, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
I am curious about qualitative research investigating information-seeking behaviors and student engagement.


Thursday November 7, 2019 10:45am - 11:25am
Citadel Green Room North, Embassy Suites Hotel 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

10:45am

Is there enough room in that cocoon? Libraries and Societies transforming together
The movement to transform scholarly communications has gained urgency and momentum following the introduction of Plan S. Transformative agreements are expanding in the US market, while the latest generation of open agreements in Europe is gaining wider acceptance as the way forward worldwide. This new publishing and licensing environment gives rise to unique pressures and opportunities for self-publishing societies as well as research libraries. For scholarly societies, a transition from the long-stable subscription model to open models presents an opportunity to expand the reach of their members’ research, but it also introduces potentially existential financial risks. For libraries, the transition from subscriptions to open models requires a careful weighing of options and strategic reinvestment that preserves essential access while avoiding unintended consequences. This panel presentation will explore how two self-publishing societies and two research libraries are adapting and approaching the accelerating transformation of scholarly publishing. Could “Read, Publish, & Join” be the next collaborative experiment? This session explores ideas like this and others where we can find common cause and work together to ensure a diverse scholarly publishing future where research is shared openly and self-publishing societies, researchers, and libraries can thrive.

Speakers
avatar for Sunshine Carter

Sunshine Carter

CDO (Interim) & ERL, University of Minnesota
Sunshine Carter is the Electronic Resources Librarian and Manager of the E-Resource Management Unit at the University of Minnesota Libraries. She's also, currently, the interim Collection Development Officer. Sunshine is interested in the ecosystem of e-resources from licensing to... Read More →
TD

Tracey DePellegrin

Executive Director and Executive Editor, GENETICS & G3, Genetics Society of America
Executive EditorGENETICS & G3: Genes|Genomes|Genetics at Genetics Society of America
avatar for Curtis Brundy

Curtis Brundy

AUL for Scholarly Communications and Collections, Iowa State University
I oversee collections and scholarly communications at Iowa State, which is a signatory of the OA2020 initiative. I am active with several groups that are interested in seeing, as well as assisting, scholarly publishers and societies transition to open business models.
avatar for Stacey Burke

Stacey Burke

Director of Publlishing Marketing and Sales, American Physiological Society



Thursday November 7, 2019 10:45am - 11:25am
Citadel Green Room South, Embassy Suites Hotel 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

10:45am

Open Web Tools 2019
Michelson and Price would like to share a variety of new "open web" resources as well as update some of the resources they shared in the 2018 edition of this session.

Attendees will leave with a list of resources to demo on their own and share with colleagues.

The types of resources we shared in 2018 are listed in the conference program.
https://2018charlestonconference.sched.com/event/GB3Z/open-web-tools

Speakers
avatar for Gary Price

Gary Price

Founder/Editor, infoDOCKET and Consultant, Self
Gary Price is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area.  He is currently the Resource and Reference Center Director for GIJN and editor of infoDOCKET.com, a daily update of news and new research tools.He lives near Washington... Read More →
avatar for Curtis Michelson

Curtis Michelson

Founder and Principal, Minds Alert, LLC
Organizational Strategy and Design


Thursday November 7, 2019 10:45am - 11:25am
Cypress Ballroom South, Courtyard Marriott Hotel 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

10:45am

The time has come to talk of... who should own scholarly infrastructure?
It's in the air. As scholarly products become more open (through open access mandates, open data requirements, preprint adoption, open lab notebooks...), the scholarly community is starting to realize the drawbacks of building its scholarly communication tools on proprietary platforms rather than open alternatives.

Should open infrastructure matter to you? What are its pros and cons?

What should you do about it? Should you do something now, or sit tight for another few years?

We will weigh the relative importance of data use restrictions, open source code, open data APIs, reuse licenses, analytics gathering, and business models that keep open infrastructure sustainable for various stakeholder groups.

This talk will draw on work by the Joint Roadmap for Open Science Tools, the Invest in Open Infrastructure committee, nonprofits like Our Research, Open Access Button, JISC, etc., and Dr Heather Piwowar's keynote at Open Repositories 2019.

If there is interest, at the end of the session we will gather contact information to form an Open Infrastructure mailing list for scholarly communication to keep the conversation active as this trend develops over the coming years.

Speakers
avatar for Unpaywall Journals

Unpaywall Journals

Cofounder, Our Research (Unpaywall)
Unpaywall Journals is a data dashboard with journal-level citations, downloads, open access statistics, and more to help you confidently manage your serials collection: https://unpaywall.org/journals... Read More →
avatar for Jason Priem

Jason Priem

co-founder, Our Research



Thursday November 7, 2019 10:45am - 11:25am
Salon I, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

10:45am

The Time Has Come… For Next-Generation Open Access (OA) Models
Native-OA journal publishers are facing challenges to their existing business models quite unlike the challenges for commercial and society publishers with large subscription bases. “Transformative agreements” may be a viable option to flip paywalled subscription journals into open access, but is there also a need to transform models for native-OA journals?

Global library consortia, grant funders, and the Public Library of Science are currently exploring new business models that attempt to balance the imperatives of funder mandates, the high administrative burden of Article Processing Charges (APCs), and the need for a more equitable OA business model that supports diversity, equity, and inclusion. There are new challenges, incentives, and hurdles with cost-sharing initiatives involving multiple stakeholders.

Panelists will share the models under consideration, what is working and what isn’t, and the outcomes they hope to deliver in 2020. The session is designed to generate thoughtful conversations about models that look beyond APCs and debate the challenges of equitable cost-sharing among funders, publisher, reading institutions, publishing institutions, and other contributors to the scholarly ecosystem.

Come for the hot topic and stay for the thoughtful debate!

Speakers
avatar for Anneliese Taylor

Anneliese Taylor

Head of Scholarly Communication, University of California, San Francisco
avatar for Celeste Feather

Celeste Feather

Senior Director of Content and Scholarly Communication Initiatives, LYRASIS
KA

Kim Armstrong

Director, Library Initiatives, Big Ten Academic Alliance
avatar for Sara Rouhi

Sara Rouhi

Director, Strategic Partnerships, PLOS
Open accessl new business models beyond APCs; metrics; open science; library/publisher partnerships; improv comedy ;)



Thursday November 7, 2019 10:45am - 11:25am
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

10:45am

The World is Our Oyster: Pearls of Cross-Consortial Partnerships Found in a Shared Hyku Repository Service
Partnering consortia, PALNI (the Private Academic Library Network of Indiana) and PALCI (the Pennsylvania Academic Library Consortium) are collaborating to produce an affordable, open-source, collaborative institutional repository solution based on the Hyku software. Similarly, in the United Kingdom, the British Library is piloting a shared repository service with several museums and cultural heritage organizations using the same software. An institutional repository (IR) provides libraries, museums and the academic community a place to capture, preserve, and make accessible the important research, special collections, and other types of information they create. Libraries, campuses, and museums benefit from having the infrastructure and tools provided in an IR solution to manage assets and disseminate them to the larger public. However, many libraries do not have an institutional repository. Findings from a PALNI environmental scan showed 70% of the PALNI members did not have an IR solution due to cost, inefficiency, or overly-rigid solutions. In addition, trends toward market consolidation have further limited libraries’ choice of vended IR software solutions.

This session will describe a project funded in-part by IMLS to further develop the multi-tenant Hyku IR software and to create a new model for ultra low-cost hosting, discovery, and access to digital material. Presenters will describe the opportunities that present themselves when consortia step outside of their normal boundaries and collaborate more broadly with other consortia, coordinate across projects, and partner with commercial partners to create community-owned open source solutions. Attendees will learn how the consortial IR service developed in Hyku will allow individual libraries to customize and brand an IR as their own, while scaling to serve multiple consortia simultaneously, reaping the benefits of sharing the underlying infrastructure, hosting, and administration costs across institutions.

Speakers
avatar for Jill Morris

Jill Morris

Executive Director, PALCI
I advocate for and build collaboration among PALCI's 68 academic member libraries while leading strategic development and management of key consortium programs, including eResources, eBooks, affordable learning, resource sharing and supporting technologies, with particular emphasis... Read More →
avatar for Kirsten Leonard

Kirsten Leonard

Executive Director, PALNI
Kirsten Leonard is the Executive Director of Private Academic Library Network of Indiana (PALNI) in Indianapolis, Indiana. She oversees eleven full and part-time staff and coordinators who are working to support innovation and collaboration. Kirsten holds a MLIS from Wayne State University... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2019 10:45am - 11:25am
Laurens Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

10:45am

Un-volting our preferences - data security and privacy in a changing library landscape
As libraries further explore new services and ecosystems, which rely on machine to machine to business to human interoperability, balancing proactive innovation with adequate measures, governance, and policies around data security and patrons privacy is a key to our success. Creating customized services and platforms and to further automate burdensome workflows and routines depend on registering micro behaviours of patrons and staff, studying them, and apply sophisticated routines to maximize utilization and effectiveness. But how can we do so in a way that is that is secure, respectful, and transparent?

Lehigh University Libraries are at the forefront of open source development through its deep investment in working on FOLIO, VuFind, VIVO, Islandora, and other open source initiatives, it also plays a leadership role in communities such as The Open Library Foundation (OLF) and Open Library Environment (OLE). In addition, Lehigh Libraries are uniquely situated organizationally as part of a merged organization together with Technologies, Security, and the Center of Innovation in Teaching and Learning. As such, the focus around technology and its application across campus is constantly reviewed, challenged, and adapted.

In this session Boaz Nadav-Manes (University Librarian) and Eric Zematis (Chief Information Security Officer) will describe how they cross traditional boundaries to create flexible frameworks, policies, and right-fit solutions to meet the diverse needs of the library and broader university community. Participants will leave the session with a greater understanding of ways by which they and the library can continue to provide leadership in how information is appropriately used and understood while upholding cherished values of personal privacy.

Speakers
avatar for Boaz Nadav-Manes

Boaz Nadav-Manes

University Librarian, Lehigh University
Boaz Nadav-Manes is Lehigh University Librarian. He develops services, programs and activities with campus and community partners that lead to the success of students, faculty, staff, and broader community members. In addition, Boaz provides leadership and overall direction to the... Read More →
EZ

Eric Zematis

Chief Information Security Officer, Lehigh University


Privacy pptx

Thursday November 7, 2019 10:45am - 11:25am
Ashley Room, Courtyard Marriott Hotel 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

10:45am

Stopwatch Session 3: Faculty & Researcher Services
Adventures in Streamlining Research Data Services: Through the Looking Glass of an Academic Library’s Data Services Team (Brianne Dosch) ---

With more and more scholarship occurring in digital spaces, librarians see the need to manage, archive, and access digital objects, a.k.a. providing research data services. However, in the past, libraries have been more reactive in providing these services and have relied on librarians gaining data skills to use on an “as needed” basis12. Now however, many academic libraries have dedicated data services faculty and staff that serve as functional specialists providing their expertise throughout the library and campus. This functional specialist model works well enough, but has its challenges in providing streamlined and cohesive data services across disciplines. The University of Tennessee -Knoxville sought to change this model by forming a dedicated data services team consisting of a Data Curation Librarian, a STEM Librarian, and a Social Sciences Data Librarian. This presentation will detail the journey of this Data Services Team in establishing their roles and services at their university through a study of literature, campus assessments and environmental scans, and good ol’ trial and error. Some takeaways include: the foundations and historic meaning of data services, the campus-wide assessment methods employed to understand the university’s data needs, and the challenges involved in establishing a mission and vision to provide comprehensive, cohesive, and dynamic data services across disciplines. Discussion of other librarians’ experiences and opinions of data services will be welcome and facilitated by the presenter. The presentation leader will be the current Social Sciences Data Librarian who is a member of this newly formed Data Services team and who is in the first year of her academic library career.

Reshaping and Rethinking Library Services through Structured Campus Conversation (Eric Resnis, Melvin Davis) ---

Libraries are constantly evolving, but with that appreciation for change, comes pressures such as mission creep, maintaining scale, and a constant need for innovation. Changes in higher-education and a move towards user at the center bring new ways to think about these challenges. As costs increase without a corresponding budget, it is important for libraries to understand how their partners perceive the library and where the library should prioritize future efforts.

How can a library effectively determine the perceptions of their partners, while figuring out new and innovative ways to expand services? Listening tours, surveys, and focus groups are all possibilities, yet each could not meet our comprehensive need. Listening tours tend to deprioritize action, while surveys and focus groups may require us to create assumptions about partner needs that may or may not be correct. Combining the best elements of these approaches helped to meet our need by allowing for synergy between the different needs analysis methods. Framing the exercise as a listening tour helped our partners feel that their voices were heard, and that they had input into the future direction of library services. Using structured questions for the tour allowed us to more easily see commonalities between feedback from varied campus units and programs. Furthermore, it allowed us to maintain a consistent scope for our conversations, and provided for efficient and effective discourse.

This presentation describes the rationale, process, and results of a comprehensive listening tour and needs assessment at a mid-sized university. While the results of the assessment and our action plan will be shared, our focus will be on the process and rationale. Our aim is that attendees, no matter what type of institution, will come away from this session with the tools they need to conduct a similar listening tour at their own campus.


Managing Faculty Expectations: Time to Take Information about Library Services and Collections to the Faculty (Debbi Dinkins, Jennifer Corbin) ---

Faculty in their first professional teaching position typically transition from a large, R1 comprehensive university. When such faculty start work at a small university (under 5,000 students), their expectations of the library are, in many cases, unrealistic. Librarians at Stetson University, a small university in central Florida, developed a faculty collaboration program, an alternative to a liaison program, in which information about library services and collections is shared with faculty deliberately and in a just-in-time framework.
After a full year of collaboration, librarians have worked with two academic departments, our School of Music, and faculty teaching on-line courses during the summer session. We will report on our findings, both formal and anecdotal, and our plans for the future. During the presentation, the audience will be engaged with interactive polling at the beginning and Q & A discussion at the end.

Collections and Research Services for the Independent Scholar: Surveying the Landscape and Filling the Gaps (Melissa Gasparotto)---

The national network of academic research libraries serves a relatively defined demographic of college and university affiliates. Sitting alongside this network, large public research institutions such as the New York Public Library play an important role complementing these services and filling the gaps in coverage for a large and diverse constituency with and without a current academic affiliation. The general public audience includes current students, faculty and alumni, independent researchers, journalists, artists and more. How can collections and services partnerships between academic and independent research libraries serve to strengthen research for all through diversity in collecting, consortial digitization and access partnerships, and responsive programming? Hear about The New York Public Library’s efforts to target and support the broadest range of researchers at all points of the research lifecycle, and discuss ways to scale this work in the context of national civic engagement through library partnerships.

Moderators
avatar for Athena Hoeppner

Athena Hoeppner

Discovery Services Librarian, University of Central Florida Libraries

Speakers
DD

Debbi Dinkins

Associate Dean, Library, Stetson University
Dinkins is the Associate Dean of the Library, working closely with the Library Dean on issues of administration and planning. She is responsible for the management of the library’s materials budgets and operating budgets. She oversees the acquisition and cataloging of the library’s... Read More →
avatar for Melvin Davis

Melvin Davis

University Librarian, Coastal Carolina University
avatar for Melissa Gasparotto

Melissa Gasparotto

Assistant Director, Research Services, The New York Public Library Research Libraries
avatar for Brianne Dosch

Brianne Dosch

Social Sciences Data Librarian, University of Tennessee - Knoxville
I partner with social sciences researchers to connect them with the data and resources they need to succeed. I try to bring passion and excitement to everything I do, which sometimes includes referencing Harry Potter, travel, and cats. I love working with faculty and students alike... Read More →
avatar for Eric Resnis

Eric Resnis

Head of Instruction Services, Coastal Carolina University



Thursday November 7, 2019 10:45am - 11:25am
Cypress Ballroom North, Courtyard Marriott Hotel 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:30am

Lunch on your Own
Thursday November 7, 2019 11:30am - 12:45pm
TBA

11:30am

Acquisition for Academic Libraries: It’s an Art and a Science (Sponsored Lunch)
Sponsored by ProQuest.
RSVP Required

DDA, EBA, firm order, publisher-direct…the list of acquisition options goes on and on. For today’s academic libraries, devising an acquisition strategy can feel like finding the first corner piece of a 5,000-bit jigsaw puzzle. But a deep dive into metrics from libraries around the world proves that there’s method to the madness.
 
Join us for lunch and a talk by Pep Carrera, the new leader of ProQuest’s Books business unit, who will share the hard data on acquisition trends not just from ProQuest, but from across the industry. Pep will reveal which acquisition models are most popular, which styles work better for different types of content, and how a little creative thinking can help libraries create the best combination of models to provide for their patrons and preserve their budgets.

Speakers
avatar for Pep Carrera

Pep Carrera

President ProQuest Books, ProQuest


Thursday November 7, 2019 11:30am - 12:45pm
Colonial Ballroom, Embassy Suites Hotel 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

12:30pm

Down the Rabbit Hole We Go Again (the 19th Health Sciences Lively Lunchtime Discussion)
RSVP Required
Sponsored by Rittenhouse

This year’s sponsored (RSVP required to plan lunches) no holds barred health sciences lively lunchtime gathering is open to all. It will begin with greetings from luncheon sponsor, Rittenhouse. The moderator, Rena Lubker, will introduce the session and will provide introductory remarks about this year’s three presentations: a commentary on issues that keep us up at night; a report on considerations to make when leaving big deal licenses and entering into new, OA friendly arrangements; and more discussion about the impact of expansions on libraries of academic medical affiliation. All three topics should provide fodder for lively discussion by presenters and participants.

Ramune Kubilius will provide a brief annual update on health sciences publishing world developments. 

Are there trends or commonalities in the issues that concern health sciences collection managers across institutions? Susan Kendall, editor of a recent book on 21st century collection management, will share her thoughts on what keeps health sciences collection managers on their toes (or up at night). Be prepared to agree or disagree with her list.

What goes into planning, preparing and actively shifting towards a more open access friendly landscape? How do consortia make decisions to leave or enter into deals on behalf of a multi-type academic library system? Are the interests of health sciences libraries represented? Sarah McClung will share examples of recent collections decisions made by the University of California libraries and what lessons can be imparted to other libraries, including those licensing in smaller groups or even solo.

The ever-changing academic library and affiliated hospital relationship landscape will again be explored. Jean Gudenas will examine the effects of hospital mergers and acquisitions on academic libraries. She will discuss the challenges with negotiating licensing changes quickly, the commitment to communication, and other matters essential to ensuring access to resources for the new affiliates.

Speakers
SK

Susan K. Kendall

Health Sciences Coordinator and Copyright Librarian, Michigan State University Libraries
RK

Ramune Kubilius

Collection Development / Special Projects Librarian, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Galter Health Sciences Library & Learning Center
avatar for Sarah McClung

Sarah McClung

Head of Collection Development, University of California, San Francisco
Sarah McClung, MIS, is the head of collection development at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). She has worked in academic health sciences libraries for over a decade and, in her current role, she oversees the overall development and management of the UCSF Library’s... Read More →
avatar for Jean Gudenas

Jean Gudenas

Associate Professor, Director of Information Resources and Collection Services, Medical University of South Carolina
Jean Gudenas joined the MUSC Libraries faculty in 2017 as the Director of Information Resources and Collection Services. In this role, Jean leads a team of dedicated workers to deliver information across the campus, whether through the acquisition of resources, direct access to our... Read More →
RL

Rena Lubker

Research and Education Informationist, Medical University of South Carolina


Thursday November 7, 2019 12:30pm - 2:00pm
39 Rue de Jean 39 John Street, Charleston, SC 29401

1:00pm

Displaying Your Impact, Protecting your Patrons: Ethical Use of Library Analytics to Understand User Success (Vendor Perspectives)
The value proposition around library services & content and how libraries contribute to student and faculty success is of preeminent importance in today’s higher education culture. Libraries are increasingly being asked to justify their contribution to the educational mission of the institution, yet lack the tools and resources necessary to present strong quantitative evidence of impact. In addition, librarianship’s culture around protecting patron privacy is often in conflict with tracking user behavior and user analytics. Institutions of higher education are moving forward rapidly with incorporating advanced learning analytics into their institutional outcome measures to gauge performance along a continuum of educational success metrics. Libraries have largely been left out of these initiatives for a variety of reasons, although efforts across the US, Europe, and Australia are aiming to incorporate library data into overall campus learning analytics efforts. This panel presentation will feature librarian, educator, and vendors will present their views on how librarians can balance the need to protect patron privacy and the ethical use of student educational data with overall learning analytics initiatives on campus.           

Moderators
avatar for John McDonald

John McDonald

Product Manager, Analytics, EBSCO Information Services

Speakers
avatar for Michael Levine-Clark

Michael Levine-Clark

Dean, University of Denver Libraries
avatar for Philip Faust

Philip Faust

Vice President and Publisher, Academic Product, Gale
As the vice president of product management for Gale’s academic segment, Phil Faust leads Gale’s higher education product management and publishing teams to create solutions that address the needs of students, faculty, and librarians. In close partnership with customers and users... Read More →
avatar for Trevor A. Dawes

Trevor A. Dawes

Vice Provost for Libraries and Museums and May Morris University Librarian, University of Delaware Library
I am an experienced librarian and educator.
avatar for Monica Rysavy

Monica Rysavy

Director & Assistant Professor, Office of Institutional Research & Training, Goldey-Beacom College
Monica D.T. Rysavy, Ph.D. is the Director of Institutional Research and Training for Goldey-Beacom College in Wilmington, Delaware. In this role she leads all institutional research and data analysis projects for the College. Her office provides faculty and staff training support... Read More →
avatar for Russell Michalak

Russell Michalak

Director (Library, Archives, & Learning Center), Goldey-Beacom College
Russell Michalak, MLIS, joined Goldey-Beacom College (GBC) in 2010. As Director of Library & Learning Center/Assistant Professor, he oversees all operations of the library including the annual budget. In addition, he supervises and hires librarians, tutors, paraprofessionals, as well... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2019 1:00pm - 2:10pm
Grand Ballroom 1, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

1:00pm

The Time has come to talk…with ourselves: Through the Looking Glass, and what A.L.I.C.E (Assessing Library Institutional Commitment and Experience) found there
While librarians have become increasingly comfortable with assessing their effectiveness vis-à-vis external stakeholders, internal assessment efforts are less frequent. What happens when library employees apply their assessment tools and skills to explore their colleagues’ experiences?

This session will focus on one large public university library’s employee engagement committee’s experience conducting a multi-phase and -method exploration of employee engagement and satisfaction. Presenters will describe the process and share lessons learned throughout. Attendees will learn about:

  • Building an effective project team
  • Sequencing phases of the assessment project
  • Best practices for developing effective survey instruments
  • Developing and facilitating focus groups
  • Analyzing data and sharing findings, including tips for effective data visualization
  • Presenting findings effectively to different stakeholder groups
  • Maintaining momentum and identifying appropriate next steps
  • Using results to set priorities and improve employee engagement
  • Tips, tricks, and lessons learned from this project
As the library employee engagement committee collaborated with a faculty member (one of the presenters) from the university’s iSchool to conduct the focus groups, the session will include strategies for reaching out to colleagues from outside the library for assistance with assessment projects. Recognizing that internal assessment differs significantly from working with external stakeholders, the presenters will also discuss strategies for responding to findings in real time, recalibrating efforts between individual phases of the project, and communicating with all stakeholders throughout the process.

The presenters will use a mix of active-learning techniques, including hands-on group work, brainstorming, and facilitating discussion of real-world scenarios and approaches. This session will be appropriate for employees of both small and large libraries with an interest/responsibility related to internal assessment, employee engagement, and organizational culture, as well as employees interested in acquiring skills in developing surveys, conducting focus groups, and unique approaches to employee engagement.

Speakers
RM

Regina Mays

Head (Interim), Assessment Programs and Collection Strategy, University of Tennessee Libraries
avatar for Rachel Fleming-May

Rachel Fleming-May

Associate Professor, University of Tennessee School of Information Sciences
GW

Greg Womac

Director of Public Services, University of Tennessee Libraries


Thursday November 7, 2019 1:00pm - 2:10pm
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott Hotel 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

1:00pm

Assessing The Library: An Unquiet History, by Matthew Battles
Assessing The Library: An Unquiet History. By Matthew Battles

Now that #charlestonlibraryconference# has declared that the“ time has come to talk of many things” , it would be helpful for all practitioners to cast a critical eye on that ”constellation of books and services”we so proudly call a library.
Beginning with its storied institutional past, its myriad socio--cultural roles, primarily the organization of the world’s knowledge systems , the provision of access to subject and special collections, adapting to the pressures of globalization and the evolving information needs and styles brought on by the world-wide web, the Library has weathered many a storm.
In the recent past, major technological innovations spawning the unbridled growth of social media, world conflict and inflation have led to an operational crisis that threatens not only financial and human resources, but scholarly communication in general.
This paper intends to lead a discussion of the current state and future of the library, using the panoramic , inclusive narratives in The Library: An Unquiet History, by Matthew Battles. The author’s vast sweep of the history of libraries over many time periods and geographic regions would serve as a comparative platform from which the crises of the current library is evaluated by diverse voices.

Speakers
avatar for Joyce Dixon-Fyle

Joyce Dixon-Fyle

Professor; COORD/LIBRARIAN, COLLECTION DEVELOPMENT, DePAUW UNIVERSITY
Joyce is an academic librarian (Professor) and Coordinator of Collection Development at DPU, where she has worked for many years. She earned both Ph.D. (French Literature)and MLS degrees from Indiana University, Bloomington, IN. Her primary services include assessing and selecting... Read More →
avatar for Azungwe Kwembe

Azungwe Kwembe

Coordinator of Acquisitions, Chicago State Univ


Thursday November 7, 2019 1:00pm - 2:10pm
Citadel Green Room South, Embassy Suites Hotel 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

1:00pm

Bridging the Publisher-Library Gap to Solve Selection Challenges
During this session, you’ll learn from a panel of librarians and publishers about common challenges, impacts and possible solutions for
• Consistency in ebook packages and how they compare to other offerings;
• Poor metadata and what can be done to fix it;
• Uncertainty in publication dates;
• The need for reliable pricing;
• The challenges of existing DDA and EBA offerings; and
• The analytics and metrics libraries use to measure performance and how these relate to publisher goals.
Bring your questions and come ready to explore multiple perspectives on issues facing today’s selection librarians.

Speakers
avatar for Ellen Safley

Ellen Safley

Dean of Libraries, University of Texas at Dallas
Ellen Safley is the Dean of Libraries at the University of Texas at Dallas.  Her research interests include enhancing and developing new services for the 21st century library, migrating traditional collections to maximize the acquisition and use of electronic resources, and embracing... Read More →
avatar for Audrey Marcus

Audrey Marcus

Vice President, Books Product & Operations, ProQuest
LN

Lisa Nachtigall

Director, Global Library Resellers, OUP


Thursday November 7, 2019 1:00pm - 2:10pm
Cypress Ballroom South, Courtyard Marriott Hotel 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

1:00pm

Do the Right Thing: Sustainability, Values, and Streaming Video
Streaming video has revolutionized the use of film for teaching across the curriculum. Employing a flipped classroom model, faculty assign viewing as homework, and preserve valuable class time for discussion of content. Faculty and students prefer streaming. Exponential increase in demand for streaming video has precipitated a crisis for academic libraries. Users expect a comprehensive range of video content; faculty expect that most content will be available, and fast and cheap to acquire. Time-limited streaming licenses may appear less costly in the short term, but these licenses frequently conflict with libraries’ missions to build permanent collections. With repeated licensing, over a number of years the library will spend more than an outright purchase would have cost. More and more, libraries find the financial model of patron-driven acquisition for time-limited streaming is unsustainable. College and university libraries are accustomed to paying institutional pricing for video content. Niche film content vendors have long relied on institutional pricing models to support continued creation and distribution of high-quality video. Demand for streaming content has disrupted libraries’ budgets and workflows, and lowered many content producers’ revenue streams. It’s time to talk about the scholarly video ecosystem and how it fits with libraries’ budgets and institutional values . There is no one-size-fits-all model for video acquisitions. A library would not acquire all print materials from a single vendor, and cannot expect that for video. Excellent content resides across a wealth of platforms. Honest conversations between librarians, streaming platform representatives, and film distributors build common understandings and create positive outcomes for both. In this session, two librarians and a film distributor discuss how libraries can work with platforms and distributors to employ acquisition models that are in line with institutional values, that are sustainable for institutional budgets, and that provide a sustainable revenue stream for content creators and distributors. Audience participation is encouraged.

Speakers
avatar for Trey Shelton

Trey Shelton

Chair, Acquisitions & Collections Services, University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries
avatar for Sarah McCleskey

Sarah McCleskey

Head of Resource & Collection Services, Hofstra University
My units get things to people in ways that are efficient. Whether it's circulation, document delivery, resource sharing, DVDs, streaming licensing ... we deliver content to users using well-honed workflows and secret library magic. We maintain the integrity of our print collection... Read More →
AH

Alex Hoskyns-Abrahall

Vice President and Director of Bullfrog Communities, Bullfrog Films


Thursday November 7, 2019 1:00pm - 2:10pm
Grand Ballroom 2, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

1:00pm

Evidenced-based Acquisition for Primary Source Content - A New Model for Access and Ownership
Contributing to this presentation but unable to attend the conference: Cynthia Elliott, Content & Collections Librarian, University of Arizona Libraries, and Stephanie Church, Acquisitions Librarian, Case Western Reserve University, Kelvin Smith Library.

Over the past two decades, libraries have increasingly embraced acquisitions models that emphasize broad access over content ownership. While such models provide unprecedented access to content which would otherwise have been financially prohibitive to procure, the shift has left many libraries at odds with their stated mission of content preservation and stewardship. The evidence-based acquisition allows organizations to acquire content that has current demonstrated need by the organization’s users and thus shows immediate and increased return on the investment in the new content. As collection decisions have become increasingly data-driven, the successes of e-book acquisitions by evidence-based processes have progressed into the acquisition of online primary source collections. The general concept is similar to e-book processes, but implementation, analysis, and decision parameters can vary greatly.

In 2018, Case Western Reserve University, the University of Arizona Libraries, and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign entered into multi-year agreements with ProQuest to provide access to packages of primary source collections, with the option to purchase in perpetuity selected collections at the end of each year. This evidence-based acquisition model, the first of its kind for primary source material, offers a middle ground between broad access and ownership, allowing libraries to expose previously unobtainable primary source content to its constituents, while also demonstrating a commitment to providing enduring value and availability for its collections.

In this session, we discuss the history, pressures, and timeline for pursuing such agreements, as well as the basics of the agreement itself. We also describe how libraries implemented and promoted the content, the lessons that were learned, the assessments that were made, and how we may use this model in the future. ProQuest will also share why this model is one they offer and the benefits they see.

This session will be of interest to academic librarians interested in collection management and new models for acquiring and accessing primary source content. After this session, attendees will understand this new model, be able to explain it to interested stakeholders, and approach vendors about implementing similar models.

Speakers
avatar for Brian C. Gray

Brian C. Gray

Special Projects Officer, Case Western Reserve University, Kelvin Smith Library
avatar for Teresa Hazen

Teresa Hazen

Department Head, University of Arizona
avatar for Lisa McDonald

Lisa McDonald

Sales Consultant, Primary Source Collections and Historical Newspapers, ProQuest
I'm the Historical Collections/Primary Sources collection specialist for ProQuest in OH/KY and MI - I've been with ProQuest for 5 years and live in Circleville, OH. I'm a graduate of the Kent State University MLIS program.
HT

Holly Talbott

Electronic Resources & Licensing Librarian, University of Arizona Libraries
avatar for Thomas H. Teper

Thomas H. Teper

Associate Dean Collections & Technical Services, University of Illinois Library



Thursday November 7, 2019 1:00pm - 2:10pm
Gold Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

1:00pm

It's Time to Look That Gift Horse in the Mouth: Approaches to Managing Gifts
Slides (Link to Linfield College IR)

Many librarians have a love-hate relationship with gift donations. Gifts can be a welcome source of material for a library’s collection and can provide great public relations opportunities for libraries, but their associated costs – including the amount of time it takes to review and process donations – are very real. Is accepting gifts worth the effort, or is it time to send the proverbial gift horse packing? This session seeks to engage attendees in discussion about a variety of issues pertaining to gift donations. Sample discussion topics might include: How do you handle an onslaught of donations at the same time with minimal staffing? What do you do when non-library staff tell donors one thing but your professional judgment says you should do otherwise? Which strategies for reducing donation backlogs seem to work best? How do you assess donations in areas for which you have limited (or even no) familiarity? Attendees will leave the session with ideas for alternate approaches to handling gifts, examples of gift policies they can reference when crafting or refining their own institutions’ policies, and ways to incorporate student workers into their local workflows for gift donations.

Speakers
avatar for Kathleen Spring

Kathleen Spring

Collections Management Librarian/Associate Professor, Linfield College
Kathleen Spring is Collections Management Librarian/Associate Professor and DigitalCommons Coordinator at Linfield College. Prior to beginning a career in libraries, Kathleen taught speech communication at Eastern Oregon University, Suffolk County Community College, and Hofstra University... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2019 1:00pm - 2:10pm
Carolina Ballroom A, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

1:00pm

What Exactly Would You Like Tech Services To Do?
What role, if any, should Tech Services staff play in collection development in academic libraries? We set out to answer this question by surveying colleagues for their thoughts about non-liaison faculty and staff participating in the collection development process.

Some academic libraries have Tech Services staff that help with collection building, whether it be a lot or a little. Others have Tech Services departments that have a strict policy of not getting involved in collection building. During this session, we will present findings from the survey and share any common trends or opinions that exist in academic librarianship.

Attendees will be encouraged to share their own thoughts, and the collection-development models that exist in their institutions. We will discuss the strengths and weaknesses of various approaches, and identify the factors that contribute to a successful collection development policy. Is good collection development possible with some kind of collaboration with liaisons and tech services? Or is it only possible if there is a clear line between who makes purchase decisions and who processes the selections?

The objective of the session, in addition to presenting data and fostering conversation, is to determine if attendees’ experiences and thoughts are reflected in the survey data. We feel that there are many people who have strong opinions on this subject and we would like to offer a session where those opinions can be voiced. For those who struggle with decisions about this kind of division of labor, we hope to provide ideas that can lead to productive conversations at their respective schools.

Speakers
avatar for Charlie Sicignano

Charlie Sicignano

Head of Technical Services, University of West Georgia
Acquisitions & Collection development, collection assessment, licensing of academic content
CH

Corey Halaychik

Head of Content Management, University of Texas at Austin
JM

Joe Marciniak

Electronic Resources Librarian, Princeton University


Thursday November 7, 2019 1:00pm - 2:10pm
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

1:00pm

Collecting to Disseminate: Awareness, Action, Assessment as a Three-Pronged Approach to Proving Academic Library Value through User-Centric Collection Work
In the wake of massive economic, cultural, and pedagogical shifts within the higher education ecosystem, academic libraries adapt to these developments by extending themselves within the institutional setting and meeting their patrons at the point of need. Typically, this is achieved through measures like tailored literacy instruction and learner-centered services. But are academic libraries doing enough to leverage their collections toward affirming their relevance in an ever-changing educational landscape?

This presentation delineates a three-pronged approach to proving academic library value rooted in the three A’s of ensuring accessibility of library resources: Awareness of needs, Actions taken, and Assessment of results. We set the stage by contextualizing the value conversation within the larger discourse about change in the academic library environment. We then engage the audience in a dialog about the ongoing transition toward a user-centered library service philosophy. We also offer a more balanced perspective taking into account the impact of a carefully developed collection on the entirety of learner experience.

We support this argument with two scenarios currently employing the three A’s model at mid-size academic libraries. The first case highlights the importance of cross-campus collaborations at the Awareness stage, as evidenced by the successful efforts of Subject Liaisons at Eastern Washington University to steer through the roadblocks of the budget realignment process and involve College leadership in critical collection decisions.

Awareness matters only when followed by Action and Assessment, as the second case, that of the University of Northern Colorado, illustrates. The Education Librarian used the Faculty Assessment Mini-grant findings to incorporate diversity, inclusion, and social justice materials into the Youth collection, thereby addressing top institutional priorities. Through these scenarios, we share insights on how to build on the three A’s model and make academic library collections not only “useful” but actually used by all of library constituents.

Speakers
avatar for Liya Deng

Liya Deng

Social Sciences Librarian, Eastern Washington University
ST

Stan Trembach

Education Librarian, University of Northern Colorado


Thursday November 7, 2019 1:00pm - 2:10pm
Ashley Room, Courtyard Marriott Hotel 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

1:00pm

From Fakes to Facts: How Librarians Can Foster Critical Thinking Among All Students
We live in an age of information overload which leads to our information landscape becoming replete with examples of misinformation, oversimplification, and overly biased rhetoric. Despite increased public awareness, the challenges often referred to under the umbrella of ‘fake news’ continue to be highly problematic for information consumers. Our universities are seeking to ensure students are able to think critically, and be discerning information consumers that can separate fact from fiction, and approach their sources with an objective eye. Many librarians are finding new ways to support the growth of critical thinking habits - but what’s the best way to do this among students with widely diverse backgrounds – cultural, political, geographical, and academic? In this lively discussion, Dan Chibnall, Sarah Morris, Roz Tedford, Amanda DiFeterici and Kiren Shoman will share strategies and resource ideas for helping librarians make critical thinkers of patrons. They will encourage debate on creating habits that foster student success and enable students to overcome their own biases to become more informed, better-contributing citizens. Please come with your own strategies, ideas to test, tools to suggest, and experience that participants can take back to their institutions to enable engaging ways of fostering critical thinking among all students.

Speakers
avatar for Rosalind Tedford

Rosalind Tedford

Director of Research & Instruction, Wake Forest University
Information Literacy; Instruction; Liaison Work
avatar for Kiren Shoman

Kiren Shoman

VP of Editorial Pedagogy, SAGE Publishing
Kiren is responsible for SAGE London’s pedagogical publishing, covering textbooks, reference and video. Kiren is also responsible for Sage's recent acquisition, Talis, a technology company focused on connecting teaching and learning. She has played an instrumental role in the development... Read More →
avatar for Dan Chibnall

Dan Chibnall

STEM Librarian, Drake University
Dan Chibnall received his MLS from the University of Missouri-Columbia in 2005. He is the STEM Librarian at Drake University in Des Moines, Iowa and has been in that role since July 2016. Prior to that, he served as the User Services and Instructional Design Librarian at Grand View... Read More →
SM

Sarah Morris

Head of Instruction and Engagement and Subject Librarian for English, Emory University
AD

Amanda DiFeterici

Product Manager of Information Literacy Products, Credo Reference



Thursday November 7, 2019 1:00pm - 2:10pm
Salon II, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

1:00pm

Let’s give them something to talk about… Textbook Affordability and OER
Florida Gulf Coast University and the University of North Alabama are both in their second year of Library Textbook Affordability Projects. Presenters will briefly share the structure of the programs at each of their institutions including how we obtained funding, enlisted the support of our campus bookstore and academic departments, identified the most-needed textbooks, set up and maintained the collection, and let students place holds for Reserve textbooks. They will share their successes and their challenges and how developing a robust textbook affordability program can support broader campus Open Education Resource goals. The presenters will facilitate a lively discussion about library-led initiatives to help students afford course textbooks and materials. We will share what worked and what didn’t work at our university libraries. All perspectives and approaches are welcome!

Speakers
avatar for Derek Malone

Derek Malone

University Librarian, University of North Alabama
Derek Malone is the University Librarian at the University of North Alabama. Prior to his transition into administration, Derek worked in varying positions related to resource sharing. As a department head and borrowing specialist, Derek has focused on initiatives that increase communication... Read More →
avatar for Linda Colding

Linda Colding

Head, Reference, Research & Instruction, Florida Gulf Coast University
Reference, Research, Mobile Librarian services
avatar for Jennifer L. Pate

Jennifer L. Pate

Scholarly Communications and Instructional Services Librarian, University of North Alabama
avatar for Peggy Glatthaar

Peggy Glatthaar

Head of Customer Services, Florida Gulf Coast University Library
Peggy manages, develops, and evaluates the library’s Customer Service Department, which includes Circulation, Interlibrary Loan, and Course Reserves at Florida Gulf Coast University in Fort Myers, Florida.


Thursday November 7, 2019 1:00pm - 2:10pm
Carolina Ballroom B, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

1:00pm

Ethics and the Archives: Panel discussion on historical and contemporary issues related to online discovery and use of historical information and archives
Over the past year the uncovering of racially charged photos in college yearbook archives has gained national attention. These incidents pushed universities and libraries to review their holdings and weigh policies on the preservation and digitization of these historical records that often contain painful and controversial content from the past.

While not every institution has nor welcomed this kind of spotlight on its archival content, as more of our institutional and cultural histories become digitized and exposed to wider audiences, how should we consider the impact such material might have?

What if the digitized content exposes painful periods of discrimination in an institution’s history? What if it can be used to promote hate, prejudice, and bigotry? What if it espouses views that are no longer held by an individual or an institution? What if the library’s stance on protection of the historical record is at odds with an individual’s right to be forgotten?

Our panel explores the value in sharing historical content and the need to consider the broader impact and context. We will discuss the complicated legacies of history including racism, sexism and radicalism preserved in archives and how digitization and access decisions are being considered as we wrestle with both the desire to preserve and provide access with the hope of changing painful elements from our past.

Jeff Moyer, Director and Founder of Reveal Digital (now a part of ITHAKA) will moderate our conversation that explores the collective and extensive experience of the panel related to digitization decisions and thoughts on balancing preservation with ethical considerations.

Panelists:

Rebecca Hankins, Africana Resources Librarian/Curator, Texas A&M University
Thai Jones, Herbert H. Lehman Curator for American History, Columbia University
Chelcie Juliet Rowell, Team Lead for Digital Scholarship, Tisch Library, Tufts University
Melissa S. Stoner, Native American Studies Librarian, Ethnic Studies Library, University of California, Berkeley

Moderators
JM

Jeff Moyer

Director and Founder, Reveal Digital (part of ITHAKA)

Speakers
avatar for Rebecca Hankins

Rebecca Hankins

Professor/Africana/W&G Studies Librarian/Archivist, Texas A&M University
Rebecca Hankins is a tenured Professor and Certified Archivist/Librarian responsible for building collections related to Africana and Women’s and Gender Studies at Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas. Her previous employment included 12 years as a senior archivist at The... Read More →
avatar for Melissa Stoner

Melissa Stoner

Native American Studies Librarian, Ethnic Studies Library, University of California, Berkeley
Melissa Stoner specializes in digital archives and collections, she is currently coordinating the creation of the UC Berkeley Ethnic Studies Library digital lab
avatar for Chelcie Juliet Rowell

Chelcie Juliet Rowell

Team Lead for Digital Scholarship, Tufts University
TJ

Thai Jones

Herbert H. Lehman Curator for American History, Columbia University


Thursday November 7, 2019 1:00pm - 2:10pm
Citadel Green Room North, Embassy Suites Hotel 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

1:00pm

Great Expectations: Leading Libraries Through the Minefield of Continuous Change
If there is one thing all library administrators and managers can be sure of, it is that our space, our collections, our systems and our leadership will be impacted by change. Managing that change is critical if managers, directors, deans in our libraries will be able to continue to meet the needs of our communities with different tools and resources. This lively discussion will feature brief presentations about how libraries at Carnegie Mellon University and at Kresge Business Administration Library (University of Michigan) have changed in recent history. The presenters will include what worked well and what worked not as well at the two institutions. They will focus on two areas. First, Denise Novak will explore change through five key aspects: nature, process, role, culture and staff participation of change. Second, Corey Seeman will explore change as defined by six key terms: inevitability, rapidity, flexibility, hospitality, accountability, and empathy. Participants at the meeting will be invited to share how change is managed at their institutions and what issues might be present or on the horizon.

Speakers
avatar for Denise D Novak

Denise D Novak

Acquisitions Librarian, Carnegie Mellon University
Denise Novak is a senior librarian and Acquisitions Librarian for the Carnegie Mellon University Libraries. She is currently a member of the American Library Association Council. She is a former president of NASIG, served two terms as treasurer of NASIG, and has served on committees... Read More →
avatar for Corey Seeman

Corey Seeman

Director, Kresge Library Services, University of Michigan
Corey Seeman is the Director of Kresge Library Services of the Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan. The unit has recently undergone a great transformation from a traditional library to an electronic-only library service group with the completion of the Ross Construction... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2019 1:00pm - 2:10pm
Salon I, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

1:00pm

Leading from below: Influencing vendors and collection budget decisions as a subject liaison
Subject liaisons are responsible to their facility and students for subject-specific research tools funded by the library, but most subject liaisons don’t make the final decisions on subscriptions and other big-ticket items. How can we make effective recommendations to the decision makers? And how can we influence vendors about product development, pricing, and licensing issues as subject specialists but not budget controllers?

We will discuss these issues and opportunities while also providing a few successful and not so successful examples. Librarians and vendors are welcome to provide their own ideas, frustrations, and happy endings. We intend this program to be relevant to any type of subject liaison.

Being a "lively discusion", this session will be discussion-centered and will feature small/breakout groups as well as large group interaction and sharing.

The facilitators are early-career and mid-career subject liaisons representing medium and large campuses.

Topics will include: 
  • The role(s) of subject liaisons in budget decision making;
  • Pitching to decision makers regarding content, pricing, and licensing issues; 
  • Influencing vendors through building relationships, explaining our roles in the budget process, and describing the situation and needs on our campuses; 
  • And sharing final recommendations on how to influence as a subject liaison.

Speakers
avatar for Steve Cramer

Steve Cramer

Business & Entrepreneurship Librarian, UNC Greensboro
I am the UNCG Business & Economics Librarian. I'm co-chairing the Entrepreneurship & Libraries Conference, which will take place in Durham NC in Fall 2020, https://entrelib.org/. Previously I worked at Duke University and Davenport College. I'm co-founder of Business Librarianship... Read More →
avatar for Cynthia Cronin-Kardon

Cynthia Cronin-Kardon

Business Reference & Resource Development Librarian, Lippincott Library at the Wharton School, University of Pennsylviania
I love this conference and have been coming for years. Being a Librarian allows me to learn new things everyday and help researchers in discovering the data resources they require.I love bike riding, my family (which now includes two little grandsons), my cat and GARDENING!!!!
avatar for Min Tong

Min Tong

Business Librarian, University of Central Florida



Thursday November 7, 2019 1:00pm - 2:10pm
Cypress Ballroom North, Courtyard Marriott Hotel 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

1:00pm

Marketing to Libraries
Attention publishers and vendors of library-related materials, we have a presentation just for you! We’ll discuss how to target libraries that will buy your publications, making your marketing budget effective, improving your understanding of the library market, and using library associations to focus your spending. Learn from veterans in the field how libraries buy, who are the library buyers, and how purchasing decisions are made. You can’t afford to miss out on this session focused on the library market at the premier international annual library conference focused on book, serial, and electronic resource acquisition.

Speakers
avatar for Buzzy Basch

Buzzy Basch

Retired, Basch Subscriptions
Buzzy Basch heads Basch Associates. He previously had a career as President of Basch Subscriptions, and Turner Subscriptions, and Vice President Ebsco, and F W Faxon. Buzzy is an active member of ALA,SLA ,Nasig and MLA. He has been an association Treasurer, award recipient, and member... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2019 1:00pm - 2:10pm
Rutledge Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

1:00pm

As we journey towards full OA, are we using the same GPS to map the route?
With many discussions focusing on the move towards a full and immediate open access future for scholarly publications, this session will explore how this will be achieved, discuss whether there is agreement on the desired end point, consider whether all parties are on the same road, and identify the implications for what the final destination looks like. Focusing on this ever evolving conversation, questions the session will seek to address include: Is full OA best achieved by the stick of regulation or carrot of market competition? What will the world look like once the transformative agreements cease to be “transformative” and are the new normal? How will concerns related to equity and inclusion be addressed? What will be the role of libraries and scholarly societies? The discussion will be chaired by Carrie Webster, VP Open Access at Springer Nature, and will begin with an overview by Lisa Hinchliffe, Professor at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, on the current state of transformative publishing arrangements, transformative journals, and the role of transformative read and publish deals. An expert panel will then respond to questions and share their experiences and perspectives from being on the transition journey. Given the fast moving nature of this topic, exact speakers are to be confirmed nearer the time but we hope to include such experts such as a library consortia leader actively negotiating with publishers (e.g. OhioLINK), a society publisher that is having to review their existing business model in light of the changing publishing environment, and a representative from cOAlition S. We will engage the audience by giving them a platform to feed into the conversation, ask pressing questions, and add their own observations.

Speakers
avatar for Amy Pawlowski

Amy Pawlowski

Deputy Director, OhioLINK, OhioLINK
avatar for Colleen Campbell

Colleen Campbell

Open Access 2020 Initiative, Max Planck Digital Library
As coordinator of the global Open Access 2020 Initiative, I would be very happy to talk with you about open access and strategies to transform the current subscription journals system to new open access publishing models. Given my involvement with the ESAC Initiative, I also have... Read More →
avatar for Lisa Hinchliffe

Lisa Hinchliffe

Professor/Coordinator for Information Literacy Services and Instruction in the University Library, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
CW

Carrie Webster

VP Open Access at Springer Nature, Springer Nature
avatar for Stacey Burke

Stacey Burke

Director of Publlishing Marketing and Sales, American Physiological Society



Thursday November 7, 2019 1:00pm - 2:10pm
Calhoun Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

1:00pm

Athenaeum - Digital Flames
How and why do you preserve the physical record of the world’s knowledge — from parchment and ink to bits and bytes? What benefits accrue to current users? Future users? Posterity? Concepts like “truth” and “fact”?

  • Are we heading to a “Library of Alexandria moment” when “essential content could go up in cyber-flames?”(Jamieson)
  • “How are we protecting the integrity of the publishing enterprise – which is now digital – from the kinds of intrusions that would alter the meaning of texts that are secured right now inside … digital libraries?” (Jamieson)
  • “How are we going to protect against people who would … alter the substance of information inside the scholarly publishing world?” (Porter Anderson)
  • “My two kids now in their 20s, have digital keepsakes. Increasingly they rely on Facebook and the cloud to store memories. Their letters from college, sent by email, are long gone. Many photos, never printed have disappeared. The digital realm is awash with all sorts of information. … for them personal history already doesn’t reach back.” (Peter Flint)
  • “…our memories and touchstones are not only being eliminated from our lives by digitization, but are being actively appropriated by tech companies” (Kent Anderson)

Libraries have always tried to preserve information. Bibliophiles, too. This was easier when the information was tangible in books and journals, but we have entered the digital, intangible realm.

  • How can we preserve the world’s history for future generations? Is this possible?
  • How do we preserve our own histories for future generations?
  • How do we defend our sense of self and identity if tech companies own our memories and store them out of sight?
  • Not just organizations but people?
  • What should be preserved? What is culturally significant vs. personally significant?
  • If personally significant memory preservation is important, how do we recreate the natural preservation habits that once permeated informed society? What new technologies might help?
  • How? In what format?
  • Where? Who owns?
  • Can we trust commercial entities to do this?
  • What is trust?
  • Can we trust government to do this?
  • What is the mission of the US Archives in this regard?
  • Who/what is the best guardian? Curator?

Speakers
KA

Kent Anderson

Founder, Caldera Publishing Solutions
KW

Karin Wulf

Executive Director, Omohundro Institute of Early American History & Culture


Thursday November 7, 2019 1:00pm - 2:10pm
Magnolia Room, Courtyard Marriott Hotel 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

1:00pm

Textbooks have many flavors: Understanding the complexities for students, instructors, publishers and libraries
Students have made it loud and clear that the cost of textbooks is unsustainable and expectations about whether student fees cover textbooks is a major issue on campuses and if they are to be sold, leased or free. Institutions and the academic marketplace are trying to address the situation. Every book is a potential textbook, but using it in a course is not so easy. Creating the perfect textbook is also no simple feat as teaching styles, academic calendars and access to different technologies vary. Curricular pathways differ at institutions where prerequisites are not the same. Faculty are often not incentivized to publish textbooks and some perceive academic freedom is challenged by others determining choices. Many variables contribute to contemporary textbooks in addition to the economics of publishing these materials. Price differential by discipline, format preference, rights management of content, compatibility with learning management systems and library participation suggest what needs attention and correction in this changing landscape. Libraries and the professoriate have addressed this with the creation of open educational resources but scaling this on a title-by-title or subject basis is slow, cumbersome and requires a major financial investment to release and leverage content. The textbook adoption model needs rethinking and publishers of these materials must partner with faculty and other stakeholders to explore new trajectories to release a viable concept of textbook that is affordable and reinforces strong learning outcomes capturing the content delivered in a variety of courses and institutional settings for students with many learning styles. Session offers insights into how publishers and providers are currently planning, who currently occupies this landscape, from leadership at Barnes & Noble who run 773 academic bookstores across the US, faculty and libraries who have launched solutions for wider adoption and new players entering this very fast changing marketplace.

Speakers
avatar for Julia Gelfand

Julia Gelfand

Applied Sciences & Engineering Librarian, University of California, Irvine
Julia Gelfand has participated in many Charleston conferences for nearly 20 years.  She continues to have interests in many aspects of the library, publisher, vendor triad that shapes collection development decisions and is watching the tides shift with new and emerging technologies... Read More →
avatar for John Brennan

John Brennan

VP of Product Management for Books, EBSCO
20 year veteran at EBSCO Information Services. Father, husband, and bibliophile. I build high performing teams that solve problems in the library eco-system.
avatar for CJ Ivory

CJ Ivory

Assistant Professor & Librarian, University of West Georgia
CJ Ivory is Assistant Professor and Instruction Librarian at the University of West Georgia where she teaches Information Literacy & Research. She also serves as a campus coordinator for Affordable Learning Georgia, a statewide initiative to support the implementation of open education... Read More →
avatar for Len Scoggins

Len Scoggins

Senior Director, Strategic Partnerships, Barnes & Noble College
Len Scoggins joined Barnes & Noble College in 1989 as a student clerk in his college campus store in Oklahoma. In his early career with Barnes & Noble College, Len served as General Manager for a number of college bookstores serving diverse audiences, including a small private Law... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2019 1:00pm - 2:10pm
Laurens Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

1:00pm

What If We Had to Build a New Publishing Ecosystem from Scratch?
If the publishing ecosystem disappeared tomorrow, what would we put in its place?

Imagine a world with all of today’s technologies to hand, but none of the publishing ecosystem: no established journals, no sixth-edition textbooks, no rows of monographs, no online reference sources – and no libraries in which to house them all.

What would we need to create? What is needed to allow ideas to pass from one mind to another, to share learning, to stimulate thinking, to entertain and enlighten? How—if at all—would we measure and signal quality and rigor? What workflows would we need, who would need to collaborate, and what technologies would come into play? Where would content be stored, and how would it be accessed? How would the processes involved be financed and sustained?

Our panel will consider these questions and more, bringing a wealth of experience from their perspectives as experienced librarians and publishers.

Speakers
avatar for Rick Anderson

Rick Anderson

Assoc. Dean for Collections & Schol Comm, University of Utah
RS

Reeta Sinha

Academic Licensing Manager, Springer Nature
Reeta Sinha has been the Springer Nature Academic Licensing Manager for university libraries in the southwestern U.S for 5+ years. She has worked in academic libraries and in the library industry for over 25 years and has been an active member of professional organizations such as... Read More →
avatar for Oliver Gadsby

Oliver Gadsby

President, Academic & Professional Publishing, Rowman & Littlefield
I run Rowman & Littlefield's Academic and Professional publishing businesses in the US and the UK. I'm interested in new modes of teaching and learning, and how resources - including books - can support the process.
avatar for Sara Rouhi

Sara Rouhi

Director, Strategic Partnerships, PLOS
Open accessl new business models beyond APCs; metrics; open science; library/publisher partnerships; improv comedy ;)
avatar for Courtney Young

Courtney Young

University Librarian, Colgate University


Thursday November 7, 2019 1:00pm - 2:10pm
Grand Ballroom 3, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

1:00pm

And It’s Time to Talk About Sustaining Our Scientific Cyberinfrastructure
Scientific cyberinfrastructure (SCI) is the distributed computer, information, and communication technologies combined with the personnel and integrating components that provide a long-term platform to empower the modern scientific research endeavor (Atkins et al., 2003). For decades, government agencies and funding organizations have made significant investments in the research and development of SCI and the creation of digital content such as data repositories, networked computing, and the tools to interact with the content. Yet, contemporary SCI projects are facing challenges as they attempt to transition from grant funding to a longer-term plan for ongoing growth and development. Regardless of research domain, SCI builders and project managers are now confronted with identifying new ways to fund their activities and sustain their projects.

Most solutions for sustaining SCI are likely to require the coordinated response of multiple stakeholders in the research, library, academic, publishing, funding, and policy communities. However, before we can mobilize community action, we need to better examine the convergent and divergent views among stakeholders, specifically what pieces of SCI are important and who are the key SCI players. Examples of such mapping exercises are the Mellon-funded landscape scan recently completed by John Maxwell of Simon Fraser University with a focus on open source publishing platforms and tools and the recent SCI Summit workshop hosted by DataONE that explored how government agencies, funders, and researchers are approaching SCI.

After quick descriptions of these activities and how the library sits at the nexus of these communities, this Lively Discussion will facilitate an interactive workshop-style conversation and activities to understand a slice of how library and publisher stakeholders view SCI. This session is for all users, builders, researchers, and managers of SCI to share their expertise. By the end of the session, we will have uncovered the list of players and complexities of interactions as we work toward developing a broader SCI stakeholder map.

Speakers
avatar for John Maxwell

John Maxwell

Associate Professor, Publishing @ SFU, Simon Fraser University
Associate Prof and Director of the Publishing Studies program at Simon Fraser University. I teach and do research on the publishing industries and their ongoing encounter with the digital paradigm.
avatar for Robert Sandusky

Robert Sandusky

Associate University Librarian for Information Technology, University of Illinois at Chicago University Library
Research data management, digital preservation
avatar for Amy Forrester

Amy Forrester

Research Coordinator, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Amy Forrester is a research associate in the Center for Information and Communication Studies at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. She currently leads relationship management for DataONE, a federated data network of environmental, ecological, and Earth observational data repositories... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2019 1:00pm - 2:10pm
Drayton Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

1:00pm

Stopwatch Sessions 4: E-collections
Decidedly Digital: Recentering Digital Collections Efforts for Sustainable, Equitable Access (Jenifer Bartle)---
Ten years ago, the prevailing wisdom in the Digital Collections side of librarianship went like this: We will know we have arrived -- and will be welcomed into the fold by our noble library colleagues! -- when that descriptor “digital” falls away and our work will simply be known as... Collections!

This has not happened (nor, probably, should it). Things are still described as “digital”, perhaps now more than ever, even as “digital” increasingly becomes the prevailing mode of access to the collections we offer our many publics, whether across campus or across the globe. The truth is that even as it gets easier to make things digital, it’s as hard as ever to make digital things useful, and especially to make them useful over time. Production and dissemination of decidedly digital data is one of the critical roles that the library has undertaken in recent years.

We can do better. Neglecting the importance of the unique requirements of digital collections work has resulted in a number of problems: under-resourced, unsustainable efforts; diffusion of expertise; incomplete adoption of accepted library standards; elision of collection development best practices -- in short, trying to manage digital collections programs as if they don’t require every bit as much expense and expertise as other collections.

The dichotomy at issue here is not digital vs. print. Rather, it is that of producer vs. consumer. Libraries have been knowledge producers for quite some time now, but always at the margins, with a degree of precarity that would not be acceptable to accord traditional collections efforts.

It’s time to bring our Digital Collections programs into the fold, descriptor intact, and give them the central place they deserve alongside other collections. It’s time to imagine other ways of expending our efforts to provide sustainable, equitable, digital access to our unique materials.

Acquiring eBooks - Does (should) workflow play a role? (Alexis Linoski)---
Is it better to own or subscribe to eresources? Is cost the only factor? Should workflow, staffing, and staff expertise play a part in whether eresources are purchased or a subscription model is used? This snapshot session will present some of the workflows involved with purchase acquisition models, such as DDA, EBS, and Firm order, and compare to the workflow for subscription based acquisition. It will also present a brief cost analysis from the institution which shows that sometimes, when time and labor are factored into the equation, perhaps subscription is actually more cost effective than ownership.

E textbook purchases. Are we making a difference? (Kate Hill)---
For three years UNC Greensboro University Libraries has teamed up with the bookstore to identify ebooks that were on the textbook adoption list to purchase for the collection. The presentation will include what types of ebooks were purchased, identify ebooks and investigate their usage, and also look at cost savings for students. The presentation will also include some other types of resources faculty have asked the library to fund to help lower the cost of textbooks for their students.

10 Things You Need To Know About A Content Transfer of eBooks...You Won't BELIEVE #9! (Tressa Santillo)---
In 2018, the Massachusetts Library System sought to migrate 20,000+ copies of eBooks and audiobooks from Baker & Taylor's Axis360 platform to OverDrive. We were ultimately successful at transferring 98% of that content but we encountered challenges throughout the process including data standardization with the vendors, communication issues with individual publishers, and timing.

The listicle format of the format is intended to engage audience members with short snippets of information and tips to prepare them for a future content migration of their own.

This presentation briefly outlines the steps of the process and recounts lessons learned. These lessons learned can be applied to any library that is considering a content migration between different vendors and the types of issues that libraries can expect to encounter throughout the process.

Moderators
avatar for Jack Montgomery

Jack Montgomery

Professor, Coordinator, Acquisitions and Collection Services, Western Kentucky University Libraries

Speakers
avatar for Kate Hill

Kate Hill

Library Services Engineer, EBSCO
avatar for Alexis Linoski

Alexis Linoski

Collection Strategy Librarian, Georgia Institute of Technology
I manage collection strategy, including acquisitions and eresource management, with an emphasis on electronic resources, such as eJournals, eBooks, database resources, and streaming media. She is particularly interested in how the library’s collection strategies can support the... Read More →
avatar for Jenifer Bartle

Jenifer Bartle

Digital Library Services Librarian, Wellesley College
avatar for Tressa Santillo

Tressa Santillo

Electronic Resources Coordinator, Massachusetts Library System
Tressa joined the Massachusetts Library System team in 2016 where she supports the statewide databases and statewide eBook program. Previously Tressa was the Access Services Coordinator at Worcester Polytechnic Institute and has also worked at the Worcester Art Museum.



Thursday November 7, 2019 1:00pm - 2:10pm
Pinckney Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm

Documenting students’ research journeys: Students’ experiences searching with Google vs. Yewno’s Discover platform
Our undergraduate students’ struggle to develop their topics for research papers, including identifying relevant keywords for searching, and evaluating resources, specifically determining what is scholarly and what is not scholarly. Library staff struggle with helping students improve these skills because data regarding their actual search behaviors (specifically their search pathway – i.e. they searched for this, clicked this result, went backwards to choose another result, searched again, etc…) has been limited. In this case presentation, we will share how we compared students’ experiences conducting research with Google and with Yewno’s Discover platform by having students journal their search journeys. This journaling included students’ reflections on searching in Google and in Yewno Discover and how each tool supported or challenged their search journey. Suggestions for conducting similar research at other institutions will be shared, as well as a “Search Journey Reflection” template.

Speakers
avatar for Monica Rysavy

Monica Rysavy

Director & Assistant Professor, Office of Institutional Research & Training, Goldey-Beacom College
Monica D.T. Rysavy, Ph.D. is the Director of Institutional Research and Training for Goldey-Beacom College in Wilmington, Delaware. In this role she leads all institutional research and data analysis projects for the College. Her office provides faculty and staff training support... Read More →
avatar for Russell Michalak

Russell Michalak

Director (Library, Archives, & Learning Center), Goldey-Beacom College
Russell Michalak, MLIS, joined Goldey-Beacom College (GBC) in 2010. As Director of Library & Learning Center/Assistant Professor, he oversees all operations of the library including the annual budget. In addition, he supervises and hires librarians, tutors, paraprofessionals, as well... Read More →
avatar for Ruth Pickering

Ruth Pickering

Co-Founder / Chief BD and Strategy Officer, Yewno
Ruth has worked for both blue-chip corporations and startups and has extensive experience across product development, program management and strategy. With experience as a managing director of large organizations, Pickering has managed both strategic planning and execution of multiple... Read More →



Thursday November 7, 2019 2:30pm - 3:10pm
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott Hotel 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm

The Death and Rebirth of Reference Resources: Unpacking what's happening with changing user behaviors
What is happening with the use of reference resources? Reference was once a prolific publishing genre and a busy, heavily used segment of every library’s collection. Today much of the library’s reference collection is neglected and many publishers have turned their attention to other areas of scholarly communication. Yet at the same time, there is reliable evidence to suggest researchers at all levels still want, need, and continue to use content that traditionally would have been found in a reference resource held by a library, whether it’s background information, historical overviews, statistical data, short biographies, definitions, etc. Significant changes in how people engage with reference content have made it difficult to formulate a clear picture of actual user demand and preferences. This program will present research on the continuing user need for reference information, how users are filling that need, and discuss how a leaner reference publishing world has evolved (or not) to match those needs. Librarians and publishers will each present their views on the changed nature of reference sources and where they see reference publishing going in the future.

Speakers
avatar for Damon Zucca

Damon Zucca

Reference Publisher, Oxford University Press
Damon Zucca is Publisher of Scholarly Reference at Oxford University Press, where he oversees strategy and development of a range of print and digital products.
avatar for David Tyckoson

David Tyckoson

Research Services Librarian, California State University, Fresno
David Tyckoson is a librarian at the Henry Madden Library at California State University, Fresno. He is first and foremost a reference librarian and has written and presented extensively on reference service and reference collections. He teaches RUSA’s online class on the Reference... Read More →
avatar for Kathryn  Earle

Kathryn Earle

Managing Director, Bloomsbury Digital Resources, Bloomsbury
Kathryn Earle is Managing Director, Digital Resources Division, Bloomsbury Publishing Plc, where she is responsible for large-scale digital products incorporating reference content. Prior to Bloomsbury, Kathryn was Managing Director of Berg Publishers, which she joined in 1993, leading... Read More →



Thursday November 7, 2019 2:30pm - 3:10pm
Gold Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

2:30pm

Drastic times call for drastic measures: Intentionality, outreach, and library leadership in times of financial crisis
Budget constraints are nothing new to academic librarians and administrators. Each year libraries nationwide contend with flat or shrinking budgets in spite of the continuing need to support evolving curricula, new programs and initiatives, and faculty research. Central Connecticut State University (CCSU) and Western Washington University (Western) are no different, each having grappled with insufficient budgets and multiple rounds of reductions and cancellations. During these difficult times, CCSU and Western measured success in large part by their ability to meet their financial obligations with minimal impact to curricula or research.

At CCSU, after years of flat or reduced budgets and resource cancellations, the Acquisitions and Electronic Resources Librarians teamed up to take drastic measures and break the vicious cycle of reactionary cancellations. The goal: to realign spending with fiscal reality; the measure: a 25 percent cut to each academic department’s resources over a two-year period. The process bought the library approximately three years to readjust spending, learn how to better support the campus, and become better advocates for library funding. At Western, major inflationary shortfalls precipitated the need for a 10 percent subscription reduction in 2015-16, through which the library was able to build greater university awareness of the serials crisis as well as an ultimately short-lived commitment from the Provost for inflation funding. In 2019-20, Western Libraries is facing the need for a 15 percent reduction and the increasingly urgent need to make collections sustainable long-term. At both universities, the necessity for reductions has created opportunities for focused outreach, education, and advocacy; more intentional and creative collection assessment; deeper and more thoughtful collaborations with teaching faculty; and hard lessons learned for library staff.

This presentation will provide an overview of both universities’ reduction processes, including where they are today and the lessons they have learned throughout the journey. Attendees will learn strategies for effective outreach and engagement, ways to position their library within broader campus and scholarly communications contexts, and practical ideas for making difficult reduction decisions. Above all, the panel will explore the importance of approaching reductions intentionally, reframing the issue as a university problem, and advocating on behalf of the library and its users.

Speakers
avatar for Mark I. Greenberg

Mark I. Greenberg

Dean of Libraries, Western Washington University
Mark I. Greenberg became Dean of Libraries at Western Washington University in June 2013. Since his arrival, he has worked collaboratively to help lead a wide variety of important library and university initiatives. Shared accomplishments include creation of the Hacherl Research and... Read More →
KD

Kristin D'Amato

Serials/Electronic Resources Librarian, Central Connecticut State University
avatar for Kristina Edwards

Kristina Edwards

Acquisitions Librarian, Central Connecticut State University
Kristina Edwards, MLIS has been a librarian at Central Connecticut State University for the past 5 years. She has worked in the area of collections and acquisitions for over 10 years. She works with colleagues across disciplines to ensure that library collections reflect the curriculum... Read More →
MK

Madeline Kelly

Director, Collections Services, Western Washington University; Western Libraries



Thursday November 7, 2019 2:30pm - 3:10pm
Calhoun Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm

Holy Crapronym: The Preponderance of Jargon and Acronyms
Jargon and acronyms are ubiquitous in our personal and professional lives, so much so that we may be desensitized to their use. Acronyms are so common in the practice of librarianship that many libraries have created cheat sheets and guides to help librarians decipher communication within their own departments and organizations. But the technical language employed on both sides of the librarian-vendor relationship may, at best, cause communication difficulties and unnecessary misunderstandings and, at worst, engender exclusion and mistrust. Furthermore, there is no evidence that proves acronyms and jargon are beneficial.

Join us for a lighthearted participatory conversation between librarian and publisher as we examine the language used in the business of library acquisitions and electronic resource management. Beyond DDA, RDA, and COUNTER, we will consider the impact that language can have on our work and on one another. The presenters will discuss their experiences with commonly used and unique or localized acronyms, assumptions, and the problems associated with the overuse of specialized terminology; and engage the audience in sharing its collective experiences.

Speakers
EL

Elizabeth Lightfoot

Electronic Resources Librarian, Florida International University
AE

Alice Eng

Electronic Resources Librarian, Wake Forest University
avatar for Nicole Ameduri

Nicole Ameduri

Licensing Manager, Springer Nature
I've been working in academic publishing for 7 years. I'm a proud member of NASIG as well as the fundraising coordinator. When I'm not working, I spend most of my time in Lake Placid working on the 46 Adirondack Peaks.



Thursday November 7, 2019 2:30pm - 3:10pm
Citadel Green Room North, Embassy Suites Hotel 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

2:30pm

Matching made in heaven: collections and metadata collaboration for print preservation
Following the trend of re-purposing library space to meet modern user needs, Western University is undergoing a planned revitalization and renovation of its largest library on campus. As a result, 500,000 items will need to be shifted to other locations or off-site storage. In this session we will outline the impact of metadata work in shifting this large collection of material to a shared print preservation storage facility, in coordination with Western University’s Keep@Downsview partnership (https://downsviewkeep.org/). Keep@Downsview is a partnership of five universities to preserve the scholarly record in Ontario in a shared, high-density storage and preservation facility.

We will demonstrate the importance of collaboration and communication between collections librarians and metadata librarians to improve identification of materials for shared print preservation. While past Charleston conference presentations have discussed weeding legacy print collections, this session will focus on the importance of metadata matching processes. Speaking from experience at Western University, we will identify the types of tools and skills that we use to facilitate this work (such as MarcEdit, Excel, Python, OpenRefine, Google Sheets, and regular expressions). In highlighting the value of metadata for collections based projects, attendees will walk away with talking points to advocate for quality metadata at their institution and with vendors.

Speakers
avatar for Erin Johnson

Erin Johnson

Metadata Management Librarian, Western University
AV

Alie Visser

Metadata Management Librarian, Western University



Thursday November 7, 2019 2:30pm - 3:10pm
Ashley Room, Courtyard Marriott Hotel 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm

Strategic Reinvestments of Journal Packages in Today’s Publishing Ecosystem
Librarians have been debating the value of journal packages that encompass most or a large portion of a publisher’s journal portfolio almost since their inception. However, recent market and publishing shifts is prompting publishers and libraries to seriously rethink/revisit these types of deals. This panel brings together representatives from publishers, libraries, and consortia to discuss how they view and are approaching negotiations and collections in the face of the Open Access movement, budget challenges, and the changing needs of students and researchers - and to envision a future environment beyond large aggregated journal packages.

Moderator: Joe Esposito (Clarke & Esposito)
Panelists: Amy Pawlowski (OhioLINK), Rebecca Seger (Oxford University Press), Maria Lopes (SpringerNature), Mihoko Hosoi (The Pennsylvania State University Libraries)

Speakers
avatar for Rebecca Seger

Rebecca Seger

Vice President, Institutional Participation and Strategic Partnerships, ITHAKA
avatar for Amy Pawlowski

Amy Pawlowski

Deputy Director, OhioLINK, OhioLINK
JE

Joe Esposito

Senior Partner, Clarke & Esposito
avatar for Maria Lopes

Maria Lopes

VP Sales, Springer Nature
avatar for Mihoko Hosoi

Mihoko Hosoi

Associate Dean for Collections, Research, and Scholarly Communications, The Pennsylvania State University Libraries


Thursday November 7, 2019 2:30pm - 3:10pm
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm

Trot So Quick: Addressing Budgetary Changes
Funding for many academic institutions seems to be steadily shrinking. Due to this some campus libraries may be facing budget cuts. This session will discuss the planning and implementation of strategies taken by the Dean B. Ellis Library to address significant budget cuts that went into effect in FY19.

Holloway and Bailey will discuss methods taken for optimizing a reduced collection development budget and distributing f